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Article

Veslemöy Heintz

(b 1815; d 1900). Swedish publisher, music dealer and printer. He began his career as an apprentice in Östergrens bok-och musikhandel in Stockholm in 1829. The history of the Östergren shop went back as far as 1802 when Pär Aron Borg started selling music from his home in Stockholm, thus founding the firm that was to become one of Sweden’s largest and most long-lived music publishing houses. By 1804 Borg, in partnership with Ulrik Emanuel Mannerhjerta, had opened a music shop. This was taken over by Gustaf Adolf Östergren (1791–1825) who not only sold music and instruments but was also a publisher. After Östergren died, the business passed through various hands until 1831, when Abraham Hirsch, at the age of 17, took over the daily management. In 1837 he bought the business and a year later he acquired a lithographic printing press and continued to expand. In ...

Article

Richard Macnutt

(b Neath, Glam., July 3, 1898; d Albury, Surrey, April 28, 1977). English music bibliographer and bookseller. He was a civil engineer until 1931, when he founded the First Edition Bookshop. In 1934 his firm issued the first of a series of some 70 catalogues of antiquarian music editions, manuscripts, and books on music; these catalogues are of permanent interest for bibliographical reference. His major contributions to scholarship are his bibliographies of the first and early editions of Berlioz, Gluck, Field, Puccini and Verdi – pioneering works of reference and essential for scholarly work on these composers – as is his Dictionary of Parisian Music Publishers in dating French musical publications. His article ‘The Fundamentals of Music Bibliography’ provides a definition and a historical survey of music bibliography and a summary of his own principles. Hopkinson served on the Technical Consultative Committee of the British Union-Catalogue of Early Music from its inception in ...

Article

Barbara Palfy

(b Kansas City, MO, Jan 12, 1884; d New York, Jan 12, 1964). American pianist, composer, music director, writer, and editor. Horst grew up in a German family that prized music and he first studied violin. After elementary school, the end of his formal education, he took up piano, honed his skills, and soon supported himself as a musician, playing ragtime and improvisations in dance and gambling halls, performing with theater pit orchestras, and accompanying solo classical recitalists.

On the West Coast in 1915, Horst encountered Ruth St. Denis and Ted Shawn, who hired him as accompanist for their Denishawn company and subsequently as music director of their new school. He remained for ten years. Immersed in the developing new abstract form of dancing, he examined the relationship of music to dance, especially through St. Denis’s “music visualizations.” He began to study musical structure and composition, and left Denishawn to continue learning in Vienna and becoming better informed in contemporary theater, art, literature, and film—knowledge he passed on to future choreographers in his book (with Caroll Russell) ...

Article

Cynthia Adams Hoover

(b Framingham, MA, 1820; d Watertown, MA, July 6, 1895). American music publisher and music and instrument dealer. According to several accounts he was a farmhand and fiddler. He compiled a large collection of fiddle tunes popular at local dances and persuaded the Boston publishers Wright & Kidder to publish it as The Musician’s Companion. As a result of his success in selling this collection from door to door, he opened a music shop in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1842, and set up a similar business in Boston in 1843. His books of arrangements and instrument instruction were popular: the Complete Preceptor for the Accordeon (1843) sold over 100,000 copies, and his violin self-mastery volumes sold over 500,000 copies. In 1850 he sold his catalogue to the Boston publisher Oliver Ditson and agreed not to publish music for ten years. During that period he lived on his newly acquired estate in South Framingham, managed the South Reading Ice Company and compiled editions of dance music and dance instruction books....

Article

Miriam Miller

(fl 1679–99). English music publisher and bookseller. He was one of the London music publishers to employ the printer John Heptinstall, who printed the five books of his Thesaurus musicus, a series of song anthologies (1693–6), and A Collection of New Ayres: Composed for Two Flutes … in 1695. He is generally taken to be the author of a work printed for him by Nathaniel Thompson in 1679, A Vade Mecum for the Lovers of Musick Shewing the Excellency of the Rechorder, and he also published John Banister’s The Most Pleasant Companion or Choice New Lessons for the Recorder or Flute (1681) and some of the songs from Henry Purcell’s The Indian Queen (1695; neither Hudgebut nor his publishing partner, John May, appears to have asked the composer’s permission in this venture). Hudgebut had several addresses during his career: he was first at the Golden Harp and Hoboy in Chancery Lane, then at St Paul’s Churchyard and lastly in the Strand, near Charing Cross. (...

Article

Teresa Chylińska

(b Halberstadt, 1581; d Danzig [now Gdańsk], 1666). German publisher and bookseller. He began printing in Danzig in 1609, and soon became the principal Reformation printer in Poland, with the support of King Władysław IV. He was a specialist in historical and linguistic books, although he also published a good deal of music. Much of this comprised monophonic songbooks, printed in a single impression using a Gothic notation typeface. In ...

Article

Frank Kidson

(d ?London, 1683). English instrument maker, music dealer and publisher. He worked in London ‘at the Sign of the Lute’ in St Paul's Churchyard, where his customers included the diarist Samuel Pepys. References to Hunt are found in Pepys's diary between October 1661, when he converted Pepys's lute to a theorbo with double strings, and ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(fl 1740–62). English music publisher, printer, music seller and possibly violin maker. He began his business in London by 1740, and probably acquired part of those of Daniel Wright and Benjamin Cooke, some of whose publications he reissued from the original plates. Around the mid-18th century the predominance of the Walsh engraving and publishing business began to wane, and Johnson was responsible for publishing some of the best music of the day, including works by Arne, Felton, Geminiani, Nares, Domenico Scarlatti and Stanley, as well as annual volumes and large collections of country dances. Unusually, many of Johnson's editions bore dates; their technical quality was high, some being engraved by John Phillips. A number of fair-quality violins bear the Johnson label, most probably made for rather than actually by him.

Johnson appears to have died about 1762, and from that time to 1777 most of the imprints bear the name of ‘Mrs. Johnson’ or ‘R. Johnson’, presumably his widow. The old imprint ‘John Johnson’ occasionally appears in these years, and may refer to her late husband or to another relative. Johnson's sign from ...

Article

Nadia Turbide

(b Cleveland, OH, Aug 13, 1907; d New York, NY, March 13, 2002). American soprano, music publisher, and concert manager. She studied singing with Ruth Thayer Burnham while attending Abbot Academy, Andover, and later at Wellesley College (BA 1929). After two years as an actress at the Cleveland Playhouse, she sang in Gabriel Pierné’s La croisade des enfants with the Cleveland Orchestra (1932). She was then coached by Eva Gauthier in New York and made her debut there in 1934 at Town Hall in the North American premiere of Handel’s solo cantata La Lucrezia. Three years later she sang Butterfly and Tosca with the Royal Flemish Opera in Antwerp. After meeting Sibelius in Finland, she returned to the United States and introduced a number of his songs in concert (1938). During World War II Johnson escorted a convoy of refugees from Paris to Spain and as a result of the ordeal lost her voice. She joined the staff of ...

Article

Alec Hyatt King

(William)

(b Dublin, Dec 25, 1762; d Margate, Oct 9, 1826). Irish tenor, composer, theatre manager and music publisher. The eldest of the 14 children of Thomas Kelly (Deputy Master of Ceremonies at Dublin Castle, and a wine merchant), Michael Kelly grew up amid the rich musical life of Dublin, and received singing lessons from various immigrant Italians, notably Passerini and Matteo Rauzzini. His piano teachers included Michael Arne. He made an impromptu début as the Count in Piccinni’s La buona figliuola on 17 May 1777, and went on to sing in Dibdin’s Lionel and Clarissa and Michael Arne’s Cymon, before leaving Dublin in 1779, on Rauzzini’s advice, to study in Naples.

His most influential teachers were Fenaroli and Aprile, and he enjoyed the patronage of Sir William Hamilton. He made his Italian début in Florence in May 1781, and then sang in various Italian cities including Venice where in ...

Article

Jonas Westover

(b Bronx, NY, April 17, 1934; d Boca Raton, FL, Jan 17, 2011). American publisher, promoter, and producer. He was known as “The Man with the Golden Ear” for possessing a remarkable ability to identify music that would sell. After attending Upsala College in East Orange, New Jersey, he gravitated immediately to the music industry, finding success at the Brill Building with Aldon Music Publishing. He and his partner, Al Nevins, contracted a wide variety of top-selling songwriters and performers including Neil Sedaka, Carole King, Jack Keller, and Gerry Goffin, among others. A big part of his success involved pairing writers with appropriate singers. Sedaka credited his opportunity to become a performer largely to Kirshner’s promotion; Neil Diamond, Kansas, Connie Francis, and Bobby Darin also profited from his work as a producer. Kirshner branched into recording, becoming involved with three separate labels: Chairman, Calendar, and Kirshner. One of his biggest successes came with the creation of the Monkees; he was responsible for providing the corporate-formed group with songs for their television program and spin-off albums. He also managed the studio musicians who performed on their records. Kirshner returned to this strategy with The Archies, the late 1960s band of bubblegum pop fame. From ...

Article

Susan Au

[Lincoln Edward]

(b Rochester, NY, May 4, 1907; d New York, Jan 5, 1996). American impresario, arts patron, writer, editor, and ballet company director. He was the embodiment of a twentieth-century Renaissance man, blessed not only with many diverse talents and interests but also with the financial resources and connections to realize his visions. His achievements spanned the arts of dance, theater, painting, sculpture, photography, film, and literature, but he is perhaps best known for his decades-long association with choreographer George Balanchine and the school and ballet company they founded together.

He was educated at Harvard, earning Bachelor’s (1929) and Master’s (1930) degrees. Although he first saw Anna Pavlova dance in Boston when he was thirteen, his passion for dance did not take fire until he saw Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in Europe. Among Diaghilev’s dancers and choreographers was Balanchine, whom he first met in 1933. Balanchine came to the United States at his invitation, and opened the School of American Ballet in New York City in ...

Article

Kornel Michałowski

(b Zduny, Poznań, 1770; d Warsaw, Feb 6, 1830). Polish bookseller and publisher. From about 1816 he managed a music bookshop in Warsaw which sold Polish and foreign music and also engravings of composers and virtuosos. Later he established a publishing house, at first adopting the old engraving techniques but turning gradually towards lithographic processes. His firm was, beside Antoni Brzezina's, the most important music publisher in Warsaw up to 1830. He published works by many Polish composers, including Elsner, Kurpiński, Józef Stefani and Damse, and piano miniatures, arias and opera excerpts from abroad; he also produced several educational books. After his death the firm was taken over by his nephew Ignacy Klukowski (1803–65), who directed it until 1857.

PSB (M. Prokopowicz)T. Frączyk: Warszawa młodości Chopina [Warsaw in Chopin's youth] (Kraków, 1961), 235–74M. Prokopowicz: ‘Wydawnictwo muzyczne Klukowskich 1816–1858’ [The music publishing house of Klukowski, 1816–58], ...

Article

Kornel Michałowski

(b Laszki Wielkie, nr Lemberg [now L′viv], Feb 15, 1836; d Kraków, Oct 11, 1922). Polish bookseller and music publisher. From 1855 he worked in various bookshops in Lemberg, Chernovtsy, Leipzig and Kraków, where in 1870 he founded his own bookshop and swiftly developed it into one of the leading Polish music firms. He specialized in publishing the music of contemporary Polish composers, including J.K. Gall, Noskowski, Szopski, Żeleński, Ignacy Friedman, Niewiadomski, Świerzyński and Wroński. His bookshop also imported the latest editions from abroad, and provided a music lending library, amounting to 16,000 items in 1885. From 1879 Krzyżanowski also managed a concert bureau, organizing performances in Kraków by many prominent virtuosos, notably Anton Rubinstein (1879), Joachim and Brahms (1880), Paderewski (1883 and later), Sarasate, Hofmann, Friedman, Eugène Ysaÿe and others. The versatility of Krzyżanowski’s firm was of great importance to musical life in Kraków, and his bookshop soon became an artistic centre. In ...

Article

Travis D. Stimeling

[Charles Stacy ]

(b Knoxville, TN, June 21, 1921; d Nashville, TN, March 7, 2012). American country music journalist, publisher, and promoter. Charlie Lamb reshaped the Nashville music industry’s business practices during the 1950s and 60s and promoted Nashville as an international music center. Lamb began his career in Knoxville, where, among other jobs, he booked artists to perform on radio station WROL and reported for the Knoxville Journal. After moving to Nashville in 1951, he joined Cash Box as a columnist and ad salesman and later formed the Charlie Lamb Agency to promote several top recording artists. Lamb was a founding member of the Country Music Disc Jockey Association and organized an annual DJ convention that brought thousands of disc jockeys to Nashville. In August 1956, Lamb founded Country Music Reporter (renamed Music Reporter in 1957), a trade paper that covered the Nashville music industry and offered expanded chart coverage for country singles and albums. Selling ...

Article

Brian Boydell

(b ?Dublin; d Dublin, Feb 21, 1776). Irish publisher, music seller and violinist. He was one of the most prominent and active musicians in Dublin during the 1750s and 60s. In 1745 he was admitted to the City Music, of which he was appointed bandmaster in 1752 at a salary of £40, increased to £60 in 1753. During this period he was appearing regularly as principal violinist at the summer open-air concerts at Marlborough Green between 1750 and 1756 and as conductor of the annual performance of Handel’s Messiah at the Great Musick Hall in Fishamble Street. In July 1751 he became violinist and musical director in the syndicate which leased Crow Street Musick Hall for the six years before it was taken over, rebuilt and opened as a theatre.

Samuel Lee was founder of the music shop and publishing firm which carried out business at Little Green, off Bolton Street (...

Article

(b Brooklyn, NY, July 11, 1948). American aesthetician. After attending the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1965–9), gaining the BS degree in Philosophy and Chemistry in 1969, he studied at the University of Michigan (1970–74), achieving the doctorate in philosophy in 1974. He was assistant professor of philosophy at SUNY, Albany (1974–5) and at the Farleigh Dickinson University (1975–6). In 1976 he became assistant professor at the University of Maryland, where he was later appointed associate professor (1982–91) and then professor of philosophy in 1991. He has in addition been a visiting professor at the University of London (1991), the John Hopkins University (1993) and the University of Rennes (1998). He has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism (from 1993) and in 1999 was elected vice-president of the American Society for Aesthetics. Levinson's interest in the aesthetics of music has led to an examination of musical ontology from a historical-contextual perspective, and performance, with an emphasis on performing means. He has propounded theories of evaluating music (...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(fl 1600–30). Italian printer, bookseller and publisher. He came from a family of scholars, artists and publishers in Milan. (Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo had sponsored the publication of treatises by Gaffurius and Bonaventura da Brescia in the years 1492–1500.) He entered into partnership with the Tini family in 1603 and until 1612 they produced much music, primarily the work of local composers. From 1613 to 1630 Lomazzo worked on his own; a number of his publications appeared from the presses of other printers. He appears to have been musically literate, for he selected the contents of some of his numerous anthologies himself: they include sacred and secular music by many composers, including Ghizzolo, G.S.P. de' Negri, Orfeo Vecchi, Gastoldi and Riccardo Rognoni. He also published treatises by Scaletta and Rognoni.

His son Francesco Lomazzo was also a printer. He published about a dozen books between 1603 and 1619...

Article

Miriam Miller and Andrew R. Walkling

(d ?London, 1625). English bookseller. Presumed to be a younger brother of Humfrey Lownes, with whom he was associated in several offices and commercial ventures throughout his life. He was apprenticed to Nicholas Ling from 1582 to 1591, and began publishing books in 1596 in St Dunstan’s Churchyard, Fleet Street. He moved to ‘The Bishop’s Head’ in St Paul’s Churchyard about 1605. In 1611, along with the bookseller John Browne and the printer Thomas Snodham, he acquired the rights to the music publications of Thomas East, which the three men began issuing as assignees under the music-publishing patent held by William Barley. When Barley died in 1613 or 1614, they assumed Barley’s patent, although there is no record of any formal transfer, or indeed of any effort to renew the patent when it expired in 1619. There is no evidence that Lownes was himself a music printer. He was succeeded on his death by his son-in-law George Latham, who continued publishing music....

Article

Claire Brook

(b New York City, April 28, 1960). American editor, administrator, and musicologist. She studied at Dickinson College (BA 1982) and the University of Michigan (MA 1986, PhD 1993), with a dissertation on comic opera’s dissemination in Italy in the 1740s. She began working for Répertoire International de Littérature Musicale (RILM) in 1993, becoming a supervising editor and then managing editor in 1994, charged primarily with bringing RILM’s financial affairs in order. In 1996 she became editor in chief. Under Mackenzie’s direction, RILM has flourished, maintaining its position as the discipline’s most respected music-bibliographic database, now published principally online.

In 1999 Mackenzie took on an additional responsibility as director of the Barry S. Brook Center for Music Research and Documentation, CUNY, a scholarly facility that promotes and provides a setting for wide-ranging research and documentation activities in music. Its projects include RILM, the Research Center for Music Iconography, Music in Gotham: The New York Scene, ...