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Barry Kernfeld

(b Rangoon, Burma, Dec 1, 1919; d Sydney, Jan 11, 1996). British guitarist . Self-taught, he took up guitar in 1935. While studying chemistry at Rangoon University (BS 1942) he played regularly with Cedric West. In November 1946 he moved to England, where he worked as a freelance musician, played on radio shows with Billy Munn and Ted Heath, performed briefly with Victor Feldman (June 1948), and became a founding member of the BBC Show Band, led by Cyril Stapleton. Later he broadcast on the BBC radio program “Guitar Club” (1955–8) and recorded with Ralph Sharon (1952), George Chisholm and Alan Clare (both 1956), Barney Kessel (1968), and as a leader (1966). He toured and recorded with Stephane Grappelli from 1975 to 1977; deeply devoted to Django Reinhardt’s music, he worked with Diz Disley and Grappelli in association with the Hot Club of London, which was modeled on the Hot Club de France. In the 1970s he also belonged to the cooperative quartet Velvet, other members of which were Digby Fairweather and the guitarist Denny Wright, and he played in a duo with Martin Taylor. In ...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

[Q ]

(b Tokyo, Oct 9, 1931). Japanese tenor and soprano saxophonist and flutist . After attending the Tokyo University of Economics he studied tenor saxophone with the trumpeter Saburo Okada and played at American military bases; the tenor saxophonist School Boy Porter influenced his early style. He worked with Junior Cook, Blue Mitchell, and Stanley Turrentine in Japan and was a member of a group led by the drummer Ricky Nakayama and of the Seven Fukuzin. In ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tochigi, Japan, March 8, 1949). Japanese pianist and leader. He learned piano from the age of eight and started playing jazz while studying piano at the Kunitachi College of Music in Tokyo. Having made his professional début with Sadao Watanabe’s quintet (1971) he later served as a sideman in Terumasa Hino’s quintet (1974–5) and Takeo Moriyama’s quintet (1978–82). From 1975 he led his own trio and other groups. He toured Europe and North America both as a member of Elvin Jones’s Jazz Machine (1985–90) and in Ray Anderson’s group (1990–92). From 1994 to 1995 he played with Leo Etoh’s Wa Daiko (traditional Japanese drumming) group. Itabashi has written scores for several Japanese and Chinese films.

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama and Barry Kernfeld

[Ebisawa, Kimiko ]

(b Kagawa, Japan, July 11, 1946). Japanese singer. She took a degree in the visual arts at Musashino Fine Arts University in Tokyo and then became a film animator. In 1970 she studied jazz singing, and when the film company for which she worked dissolved she moved into music, making her professional début in 1974. She performed with the trio led by the pianist Yuzuru Sera, with Eiji Kitamura, and with George Otsuka’s trio, and, although she made a number of pop albums, first recorded in a jazz setting as a leader in 1982. In 1985 Itoh spent six months in New York, during which period she performed at the Blue Note and at Sutton’s, a lesser-known Harlem club. After returning to Japan she toured with Terumasa Hino. One of the most popular jazz singers in Japan, she was accompanied by Richard Tee, Steve Gadd, and others for performances there in ...

Article

Siv B. Lie and Benjamin Givan

Jazz manouche, also known as ‘Gypsy jazz’, is a musical style based primarily on the 1930s recordings of French jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt (1910–53) with the Quintet of the Hot Club of France. Well-known 21st-century exponents include Biréli Lagrène, Stochelo Rosenberg, Angelo Debarre, Tchavolo Schmitt, and Adrien Moignard. The style characteristically features stringed instruments (primarily the acoustic steel-stringed guitar, violin, and double bass) in ensembles of between three and six musicians. Repertoire largely comprises American and French popular songs dating from the 1920s and 30s, such as ‘All of Me’, and tunes composed by Reinhardt, such as ‘Minor Swing’, ‘Nuages’, and ‘Django’s Tiger’. Performances consist of accompanying guitarists playing a duple-meter percussive chordal stroke called la pompe over a pizzicato walking bass line while soloists take turns improvising virtuosically on the harmonies of a cyclically repeating form, typically 32 bars long (see ex. 1). Improvised melodies often use techniques derived from Reinhardt’s recordings; eighth notes are swung and tempi vary considerably, sometimes exceeding 300 quarter notes per minute. Jazz manouche originated in the late 1960s, when music inspired by Django Reinhardt’s improvisations and repertoire began to be played in some Romani communities (the term ‘jazz manouche’ was never used during Reinhardt’s lifetime and did not gain currency until around the year ...

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

[Randall]

(b Slough, England, Jan 23, 1944; d New York, June 13, 2016). English drummer. He taught himself drums from the age of 11 and toured Germany in rhythm-and-blues bands in his teens. Around 1962 he served as the music director for a Japanese-American dance troupe which toured Europe and the Far East. In the mid-1960s he worked for the BBC (1965–7) and then joined Maynard Ferguson’s band, with which he later recorded (1970–73). Having moved to New York (1973), Jones performed as a freelance with, among others, Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan, Bill Watrous’s big band, Harry James (with whom he also toured), Buddy DeFranco, Jackie Paris, and the singer Anne-Marie Moss. From 1976 to 1978 he taught at Bridgeport University in Connecticut, and in summer 1978 he toured in Dave Brubeck’s quartet, deputizing for Butch Miles; he became Brubeck’s regular drummer several months later, and as such he toured extensively and performed in the Soviet Union (1980s). Among his many recordings with Brubeck are ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Osaka, Japan, Jan 31, 1947). Japanese pianist and composer. He studied piano from the age of eight and played jazz as a teenager, but in 1965 he enrolled at Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music to study composition and European art music; after receiving his first degree in 1969 he pursued graduate studies in composition at the same institution (MA 1971). In 1971 he enrolled at the Paris Conservoire to study under Olivier Messiaen, and in 1976 he received a premier prix in composition. He made his début as a free-jazz pianist in Paris in 1973, and the following year he joined the trio TOK, with Kent Carter and Oliver Johnson; with TOK he toured in Japan (1978, 1979, 1982) and in Europe (1986). Kako was also a member of Noah Howard’s quartet (1974–6), Masahiko Togashi’s quartet (for a tour of Japan, ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, May 17, 1931). Japanese double bass player. He studied double bass at the age of 19 and in 1951 joined Fumio Nanri’s Hot Peppers. Around 1959 he was a founding member of Shinseiki Ongaku Kenkyusyo (New Century Music Laboratory, a forum for avant-garde musicians), and later he led the Kings Lore Orchestra (1966–74); Masabumi Kikuchi, Masayuki Takayanagi, Masahiko Togashi, Yosuke Yamashita, Terumasa Hino, and many other progressive musicians of the period emerged from this institution and orchestra. Kanai formed the cooperative quartet Jazz Academy, with Kikuchi, Takayanagi, and Togashi, in 1961, and another quartet, with Sadao Watanabe, Norio Maeda, and Takeshi Inomata, in 1964. From 1977 he made many tours and recordings as a member of Takayanagi’s group Tee & Company, and from 1984 he co-led, with Isao Suzuki, an organization for bass players, the Japan Bass Players Club. One of the most aggressive activists in furthering modern jazz and free jazz in Japan, Kanai has remained active with various projects into the new century....

Article

Yozo Iwanami and Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Oita, Japan, March 9, 1948). Japanese pianist and leader. He learned piano from the age of three and later attended Kyushu University, where his father taught music. Although he moved to New York in 1973, he returned to Japan the following year and joined a group led by George Otsuka in 1975. From 1980 to 1985 he was a member of Elvin Jones’s Jazz Machine, with which he toured Europe and the USA, performed frequently in New York, and recorded several albums. After leaving Jones, Karashima performed mainly as an unaccompanied soloist. He led his own quintet from 1988 to 1991 and formed a trio featuring talented young musicians in 1993. As a sideman he performed or recorded with Larry Coryell, Dave Liebman, Tony Williams, Jim Hall, Toots Thielemans, Kazumi Watanabe, Kosuke Mine, and Motohiko Hino, among many others. In the 1990s he often toured Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Asia....

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Nov 22, 1967). Japanese trombonist. He started piano lessons at the age of six and took up trombone in a junior high school brass band when he was 13; while still in junior high school he joined Toshiyuki Miyama’s New Herd. Kataoka has performed mainly in big bands, including Sadao Watanabe’s Special Big Band, Takeshi Inomata’s Jazztet, Nobuo Hara’s Sharps and Flats, and George Kawaguchi’s Special Band; he may be heard to advantage on the album ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Osaka, Japan, Dec 17, 1960). Japanese vibraphonist, arranger, and leader. He learned organ from an early age, studied arranging at the age of 15, and took up piano and vibraphone to play in an extracurricular college big band, the High Society Orchestra, at Waseda University in Tokyo. After gaining his degree in electrical engineering (1984) he had private lessons on vibraphone, first in Japan and then in the USA with Gary Burton, the latter while majoring in composition at the Berklee College of Music. He graduated from Berklee in 1988 and returned to Japan. In 1990 he formed his own trio and orchestra, consisting mainly of younger musicians – including schoolmates from Berklee; the orchestra may be heard on Riverside Music Garden (1997, Tei. 28513). Katori has also performed with Yosuke Yamashita (from 1998) and recorded with Mal Waldron (the album Classics, 1999, Tokuma 71621). He is regarded as one of the most talented Japanese arrangers of his generation, and he maintains an active studio career. (...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

[Joji ]

(b Fukakusa, Kyoto, Japan, June 15, 1927; d Tokyo, November 1, 2003). Japanese drummer and leader. He was brought up in Dairen, Manchuria (now Lü-ten, China), in a musical family, and joined his father’s band there when he was 18. After World War II he returned to Japan, and he began playing professionally in 1947. He worked with the Azumanians, a septet, and from 1953 into the 1980s played in the Big Four, whose founding members were Hidehiko Matsumoto, the pianist Hachidai Nakamura, and the double bass player Mitsuru Ono; the group operated and recorded mainly under Kawaguchi’s leadership. In 1981 he recorded as a leader with Art Blakey, and the following year he performed at the Kool Jazz Festival in New York; he gave concerts in Tokyo and Osaka in 1985. In 1987 he deputized for Blakey at the Mount Fuji Jazz Festival. Kawaguchi used two bass drums and was known for his extended solos; he projected strength and vitality as a drummer but was also capable of great delicacy....

Article

Yozo Iwanami and Barry Kernfeld

(b Tokyo, Feb 25, 1947). Japanese guitarist and record producer. He gained a BS degree in physics at Nippon University in Tokyo and first played professionally with the tenor saxophonist Seiichi Nakamura in the 1960s; he also worked with the tenor saxophonist Jiro Inagaki and with Takeshi Inomata. After forming a group with Shigeharu Mukai and the alto saxophonist Hidefumi Toki, in 1973 he moved to New York, where he played with Joe Lee Wilson (1973), Gil Evans (1973–5), Chico Hamilton (for a tour of the USA, c1975>), and Elvin Jones (1976–7), with whom he toured the Americas and Europe and appeared in the documentary film Different Drummer (1979). In 1977–8 he toured Europe with JoAnne Brackeen and worked as a leader. Active from 1979 through the 1980s in computerized music and in the development and utilization of guitar synthesizers, in New York he formed the record company and label Satellites (...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Toyama, Japan, Aug 9, 1966). Japanese tenor saxophonist. He took up piano at the age of six, trumpet at the age of 12, and tenor saxophone when he was 16; a year later he began doubling on the soprano instrument. In 1994 he became a member of Mikio Masuda’s quartet. Later he joined Junko Onishi’s Jazz Workshop (...

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

Record company and label. A subsidiary of the Japanese conglomerate Matsuka, it was founded by Ken Fujiwara in New York around 1990, reissued a recording from 1986 by Toshiko Akiyoshi in February 1991, and then initiated a series of new recordings. By late 1992 its catalogue numbered 22 titles, but it appears to have ceased operations shortly thereafter. Featured artists included Salvatore Bonafede, JoAnne Brackeen, Conrad Herwig, Ron McClure, Gust William Tsilis, and Dave Stryker, among others....

Article

Yozo Iwanami and Kazunori Sugiyama

[Poo(-sun)]

(b Tokyo, March 23, 1940; d Manhasset, NY, July 6, 2015). Japanese pianist, composer, and leader. He learned solfeggio from the age of five, took piano lessons from the age of seven, studied composition when he was 13, and attended the high school attached to the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music. In 1958 he worked with the tenor saxophonist Takatoshi Oya and the Highway Sons and with a quartet led by Shungo Sawada; his early style as a pianist and composer was influenced by Thelonious Monk. In 1961 he became a member, with Masayuki Takayanagi, Masahiko Togashi, and Hideto Kanai, of the quartet Jazz Academy and worked with Lionel Hampton. He became active as a leader in 1965, played with Sadao Watanabe in 1965–6, and in 1967, with Terumasa Hino, formed a quintet of which the two became joint leaders. Kikuchi left this group the following year and recorded with Charlie Mariano in Tokyo, toured Japan with Sonny Rollins, and then went to the USA to study at the Berklee School of Music. He played with Charles Mingus in ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Osaka, Japan, Dec 5, 1958). Japanese double bass player. He played electric bass guitar in a high school rock band and then studied double bass privately while attending Kansei Gakuin University. Later he performed with the quartets led by the pianist Sadayasu Fujii (1984) and by Takashi Furuya (1987). Having moved to the USA, he worked with the Harper Brothers (1989–90), Andy Bey (1989–91), Kenny Barron and Jimmy Heath (both from 1993), Kenny Garrett (1993–5), Makoto Ozone (from 1996), and Terrell Stafford (from 1997); he recorded with the Harpers, Heath, Garrett, and Ozone, as well as with Susannah McCorkle (1993–4).

Article

Yozo Iwanami and Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, April 8, 1929). Japanese clarinetist. He played in a band at Keio University in Tokyo and worked professionally from the early 1950s. From 1954 he led a quintet, and in 1957 he played with Benny Goodman in Tokyo. He recorded as a leader with Teddy Wilson (1971, 1973), as a sideman with Woody Herman, John Lewis, Hank Jones, Earl Hines, and others, and as a leader of groups of which Wilson was a member (c1980, 1981). From 1978 to 1996 he appeared yearly at the Monterey Jazz Festival; he also performed at the Concord Jazz Festival annually from 1980 to 1983, and at the Mt. Hood (Oregon) Jazz Festival (1985 and 1991) and the Guinness Cork Jazz Festival in Ireland (1995). During the 1980s and 1990s he often played in groups with Bill Berry. Kitamura is chiefly a swing and dixieland player, but in ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

[Monky ]

(b Akita, Japan, Nov 21, 1953). Japanese drummer and leader. He took up drums at the age of 15 and, before moving to the USA, performed with the trio led by the pianist Kunihiko Sugano, the band led by the vibraphonist and pianist Takashi Oi, and others. In New York he played on the streets, and in 1984 he made his first recording under his own name, leading a hard-bop group whose members included C. Sharpe, Junior Cook, Benny Green, and Lonnie Plaxico. From the early 1990s he worked in both Japan and the USA and established two groups named the Good Fellas. The American version of Good Fellas involved Vincent Herring, Dave Kikoski, and Ira Coleman; the Japanese version also performed and recorded at the Birdland, New York, in 1997. During the same period Kobayashi appeared as a sideman with Lionel Hampton’s orchestra (1991), the tenor saxophonist Seiichi Nakamura (...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama, Barry Kernfeld and Gary W. Kennedy

(b Imabari, Japan, Dec 15, 1948). Japanese trumpeter and leader. He took up trumpet at the age of 12, when he played in a brass band as well as performing classical music; he also began to listen to Louis Armstrong’s recordings and to Afro-Cuban music. After graduating from Kyoto University he moved in 1972 to Tokyo, and that same year he worked with Yosuke Yamashita’s trio. Leading his own trio, consisting of Takashi Tokuhiro on double bass and Toshiyuki Tsuchitori on drums, he began to play in a style that combined free improvisation with more conventional modern-jazz forms. In 1975, with the addition of the saxophonist Mototeru Takagi and the drummer Yoshisaburo Toyozumi, this became the cooperative group Evolution Ensemble Unity, but soon afterwards, with changes in membership, it settled into a trio comprising Kondo, Takagi, and the double bass player Morio Yoshida; such guest soloists as Motoharu Yoshizawa and Oliver Johnson appeared with the ensemble. Kondo performed and recorded in Japan with Milford Graves in ...