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Article

Bolu  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Side-blown ivory horn of the Mvuba people of the Kivu region, northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has an oval carved mouthpiece and a fingerhole in the tip.

J.S. Laurenty: Systématique des aerophones de l’Afrique centrale (Tervuren, 1974), 397 only.

Article

K.A. Gourlay

Nose flute of the Nkundo and Konda Bowele peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made from a hollow pawpaw stem; the ends are sealed with resin and a small hole pierced in each. A thumb hole is made 2 cm from one end on the dorsal side and opened or closed as the instrument is blown with a nostril. The players are mainly children who use the nose flute for amusement. The ...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Cylindro-conical drum with two laced heads, of the Zande people of the northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo.

F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi (Tervuren, 1960), 113.

Article

David Font-Navarrete

Slit drum of the Jola people of Senegal and the Gambia. A bombolon can range from 40 to 150 cm long and often has a roughly cylindrical extension carved at each end of the hollowed log beyond the longitudinal slot. It is usually placed horizontally, resting on four small feet. The two sides of the slot produce different pitches. The instrument is played exclusively by males, using wooden sticks or bare hands. It is played in wrestling music (...

Article

Bompete  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Five- or six-string pluriarc of the Ngando people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi (Tervuren, 1960), 143 only.

Article

Raft zither of the Luo people of Kenya.

Article

Bondjo  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Side-blown ivory horn of the Konda people of the northwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo. It retains the natural pointed tip of the tusk and therefore has no fingerhole. Sometimes it is made in two parts: the upper of ivory and the lower (wider) of wood, the joint rendered airtight by a sleeve of goatskin (formerly human skin). Its use is reserved for chiefs, whose power it represents, and only they may own and blow it or empower another to blow it on their behalf....

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Small cylindrical wooden slit drum of the Nkundo people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

J.S. Laurenty: Les tambours à fente de l’Afrique centrale (Tervuren, 1968), 134 only.

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Kettledrum of the Mbwanja and Eso peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The head is usually made of an elephant ear, affixed to a clay pot resonator by fibre or leather thongs. It is known among the Ngando as ebondza and by the Nkundo as ...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Drum of the Eso people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The elephant skin head is affixed to the small cylindro-conical wooden body by means of nails bent in the shape of staples.

O. Boone: Les tambours du Congo belge et due Ruanda-Urundi (Tervuren, 1951), 8, 63....

Article

Clapperless iron bell of the Kaka people of the Central African Republic. It is struck with a wooden stick.

Article

Bongoo  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Smallest slit drum of the Impolo people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It can be tulip-shaped, cylindrical, or sometimes trapezoidal. It is used during dancing.

J.S. Laurenty: Les tambours à fente de l’Afrique centrale (Tervuren, 1968), 134 only.

Article

Percussion stick of the Dogon people of Mali. It is held on the left shoulder and struck with a small stick.

Article

Bonkeli  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Single-headed drum of the Kota and Kutu peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The head, of antelope, snake, or crocodile skin, is attached to the footed body with liana cords.

O. Boone: Les tambours du Congo belge et due Ruanda-Urundi (Tervuren, 1951), 62....

Article

Bonkolo  

Rainer Polak

Conical drum of the Bamana, Boso, and Somono peoples of Mali. The hardwood body is 50 to 70 cm tall and 25 to 30 cm in diameter. A single head of goatskin or antelope rawhide is sewn to a rope lacing affixed to small holes near the bottom. The head is beaten by one bare hand and with one light stick, which produces a sharp cracking sound. The drum can be tuned by screwing short sticks into the staggered lacing. Ensembles usually consist of two to four ...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Scraper of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Various types of scrapers bear this or a similar name. The Lia and Oli peoples call it bonkwasa and the Nkundo call it bonkwata. The Konda and Kala know it also as bokwese. Typically it is a bamboo tube with one or several slits notched on both edges or sometimes only on one edge. Wooden ones are rare and mostly confined to the Lower Congo. Here variant forms exist, such as a wooden box with a grooved stick attached to a board; an anthropomorphic body covered with skin; or a box shaped like a goat, with a notched bamboo tube replacing the vertebrae and scraped with two sticks, one solid and the other partly slit. Lemba-type wooden slit drums sometimes have the sides of the slot notched to serve also as scrapers....

Article

Boonzu  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Side-blown animal horn of the Nkundo people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has a fingerhole in the tip. This term can also be applied to a side-blown ivory trumpet with carved mouthpiece and pointed tip, of the Kala people of the northwestern DRC....

Article

Boro  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Whistle of the Barambo people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made of two pieces of wood shaped to form a slender conical bore and bound together with animal skin. To make it airtight before playing, water is poured in. Many other names designate the same instrument among the Barambo (e.g. ...

Article

Bote  

Bowl-shaped kettledrum used in northern Sierra Leone by Susu, Mandingo, Yalunka, and Koranko musicians. It is approximately 40 to 50 cm in diameter and is played suspended at waist level. The player strikes the head with his right hand, while clapping together metal rings (...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Dance drum of the Mbelo and Kongo peoples of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is double-headed and beaten with the hands. Before playing, the heads are tightened by heating.

O. Boone: Les tambours du Congo belge et due Ruanda-Urundi (Tervuren, 1951), 61.