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Bro  

Nguyen Thuyet Phong

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Budyung  

Arsenio Nicolas

Conch horn of the Kabihug people in Camarines, southern Luzon, Philippines, and of the Hanunuo (Hanunóo) of Mindoro Island. Other names for it include budyong (Cuyunin, Cuyo Island, and Mandaya and Bukidnon, Mindanao Island), longa, lungga (Manobo Agusan, Mindanao Island), and taburi (Batak, Palawan Island). Budyung reportedly also denotes a bamboo trumpet of the Hanunuo and Mandaya peoples....

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Buguri  

Pribislav Pitoëff

[puxury]

End-blown trumpet of the Toda (puxury) and Badaga (buguri) peoples of the Nilgiri Hills, south India. It is made of thin cane about 60 cm long with a bore about 1.25 to 0.75 cm wide and having five fingerholes. A short section of branch projects from nodes on either side. The mouthhole is bevelled on the inside and may be reinforced by a fabric binding. A conical ferrous-metal or buffalo-horn bell is sometimes added. It is played obliquely, sometimes by circular breathing, either solo or in song accompaniments. The spellings ...

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Buka  

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Buki  

Large natural brass trumpet of Georgia. The narrow bore is bent back upon itself in the middle and becomes conical after the bend. The bukiwas a military signalling instrument, similar to the khorototo, and was known in Georgia from the 9th to the 19th century. It was also used in bands for military, court, and religious processions....

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Article

Alastair Dick and Jean During

[bulbultala]

Plucked board zither with a simple keyboard of India, Pakistan, and Iranian Baluchistan; it is also known as bānjo, benju, or māndolīn. It was invented in Japan during the Taishō era as the Taishō-goto and was soon imported to South Asia (probably to Bombay, for it is especially common between there and Karachi). The bulbultarang (‘caprice of the nightingale’) has a pair of main strings and extra drone strings made of steel; they are plucked with a small plectrum in fast strumming style. The strings are stopped by metal tangents which rise to stop the string when the typewriter-style keys, arranged chromatically in two octaves, are depressed. The stopping mechanism is much the same as that of the clavichord. The Baluchi bānjois a metre long and has six strings; the drones are tuned to tonic and dominant on either side of the paired melody strings (C–G–G/G–G–C). The instrument is used mainly in the popular Muslim devotional music ...

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Article

Margaret J. Kartomi

revised by Gini Gorlinski

Clarinet of Aceh, northern Sumatra, Indonesia. It is a bamboo pipe, roughly 30 cm long and 2 cm in diameter, with a thin bamboo reed, typically enclosed within a coconut-shell chamber, affixed near its upper end. The lower end terminates in a coconut-shell bell, about 10 cm long, opening to a diameter of 5 to 7 cm. The instrument has six fingerholes spaced approximately 2 cm apart. The buloh meurindu is typically played by men, either solo oraccompanied by ...

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Margaret J. Kartomi

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Article

Natalie M. Webber

[bummändiya]

Clay drum of Sri Lanka. It is shaped as a bulbous pot with a short neck that flares to make a wide mouth which is covered by a skin from the spotted iguana (talagoya). At the base of the pot another short neck is left open. The total length varies from 38 to 51 cm. The drum hangs diagonally from a hemp sling secured around both necks and across the player’s shoulder. One hand beats the skin head; the other covers and uncovers the aperture at the base, altering the tone and pitch.

The bummädiya appears to have ritualistic origins, because it was made before sowing paddy, probably to propitiate the earth goddess. Superb examples, often engraved and painted, exist in Sinhalese museums and temple treasure-houses. It is now comparatively rare but in the 1980s was still used occasionally in the hill-country villages around Kandy, to accompany songs for sowing and harvesting....

Article

Elaine Dobson

End-blown bamboo whistle of the Lepchas people of Sikkim, North India. It is like the tangdue but larger, approximately 13 cm long; the tangdue is only about 9 cm long and 2 cm in diameter, and is made of wood or bamboo. The bumpachu is played, like the tangdue, by strongly tonguing the upper edge of the top hole while blowing across it and moving the instrument back and forth on the lower lip. The fingers of the right hand also play trills on the open lower end. Bumpachu were first made and used by hunters for signalling in the dense forest without making a human sound that would scare off the animals. Later, hunters began imitating birdcalls, and a repertoire of patterns evolved. Variations to the instrument include having one hole in the middle of the pipe or sometimes moving a finger in and out of the open distal end in order to change the pitch, Birdcalls on the ...

Article

Bungkau  

Patricia Matusky

[turiding]

Idioglottal jew’s harp of Sabah, Malaysia. Various styles are found throughout the state. It is commonly called bungkau among the Dusunic peoples. Among the Lotud Dusun people of Tuaran it is called uriding. The Tindal Dusun (or Kadazan Dusun) from Kota Belud called it turiding, the Bajau from Kota Belud call it kuriding, and the Iranun people refer to it as kubing. It is about 10–15 cm long and is cut from the polod palm frond (tapikan in the Iranun language). Its tongue (sodi), weighted with beeswax (sopinit) to lower the pitch slightly if desired by the player, is vibrated by tapping or plucking its basal end or by pulling an attached string. The non-vibrating part is attached by string to a small decorated carrying-case. This instrument is played for personal expression.

P. Matusky and S.B. Tan: The Music of Malaysia, The Classical, Folk and Syncretic Traditions...

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Burburi  

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Büree  

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Burunga  

Geneviève Dournon

[burungal, runga]

Bullroarer of Madhya Pradesh (Bastar district), central India. It consists of an oblong slat of wood swung on the end of a string to produce a humming sound. The burunga is used by young boys of the Maria tribe to protect the harvest against birds or while grazing cattle; it is rare elsewhere in India. The Halbi word ...

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Buzika  

Nino Razmadze

Accordion of Georgia. It has a loud, incisive tone and is used in the East Georgian mountains to accompany solo and choral singing. One of several types of accordion popular in Georgia, it is thought to have been introduced to the southern Caucasus at the end of the 19th century....