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Article

Ardin  

K.A. Gourlay

Angle harp played by Moorish women of Mauritania. It usually has 11 to 14 strings and a neck more than 100 cm long. The neck is inserted into a hemispherical calabash resonator, about 40 cm in diameter, which is covered with a stretched sheepskin. The strings are attached to a curved wooden rod on the soundtable, into which each end of the rod disappears, and to tuning pegs at the upper end. Circular metal discs with small rings round the edges are fixed on the soundtable. The harp is played with its body in front of the seated player, the neck to the left of the player’s head. It can be played with both hands or only with the left, the right then providing a percussive accompaniment on the soundtable....

Article

Arekwa  

Double clapperless bell of the Igbo people of Nigeria. Extremely large and made of iron, it is used with a drum ensemble by the rulers of Nsukka for the yam festival and New Year celebrations.

See also Ogene .

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Ari (i)  

Peter Cooke

Tall, slightly conical drum of the Lugbara people of northwestern Uganda. It has a laced head and is beaten by the hands.

M. Trowell and K.P. Wachsmann: Tribal Crafts of Uganda (London, 1953), 374 and pl.88G.

See also Uganda drum .

Article

Arigo  

F.J. de Hen

Trapezoidal or tulip-shaped Slit-drum of the Mangutu of the northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. In the region of Watsa Gombari the trapezoidal arigo is reserved for the use of the chief.

LaurentyTF, 139 F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi...

Article

Aro  

Amanda Villepastour

Combined rattle and concussion Clappers of the Yorùbá people of Nigeria and Benin. The instrument comprises two metal rings, each holding three containers, inside which are pellets. The player holds the instruments more or less horizontally and strikes the sides of the rings together. The ...

Article

Arote  

F.J. de Hen

(1) Notched flute with four fingerholes of the Mamvu of the northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. (LaurentyA, 281) (2) End- or rim-blown flute with three fingerholes of the Mundo of the DRC. (LaurentyA, 294)

Article

Christian Poché

Abyssinian drum, lyre, or lute of the early Islamic era. The word sounds foreign to the language and has no known derivation in it, but an Ethiopian origin remains plausible. Some Arab lexicographers have identified the instrument as an Abyssinian drum, similar to the kūba...

Article

Arub  

Single-headed wooden pot-shaped drum of the Bergdama people of Namibia, resembling the Hottentot khais. It was beaten with the thumbs and used by medicine-men.

See also Khais .

Article

Asei  

F.J. de Hen

Set of cylindrical, stopped whistles threaded onto cord or wire, of the Mbuti of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. (LaurentyA, 188)

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Asok  

Vessel rattle of the Pahuin of Cameroon and Gabon. The rattle can be made of any convenient container filled with pebbles or seeds, or a dried fruit shell containing seeds.

Article

Jeremy Montagu

Side-blown ivory horn of the Ashanti people of Ghana. A fingerhole in the tip allows a change of pitch. It is used for ‘talking’, recounting proverbs or history and also sending messages. It is blown by court horn-blowers of the Asantehene.

Article

Laurence Libin

Water drum of the Tuareg people of Niger. A hollowed half calabash floats open-side down in a large bowl of water (the bowl can be another calabash, a bucket, or another container) and is beaten by women using sticks, finger rings, sandals, spoons, or other implements....

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Assogi  

Rattle of the Ndasa and Mbamba of the Central African Republic and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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Concussion rattles of the Ashanti people of Ghana.

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Asuba  

F.J. de Hen

Set of eight cylindrical, stopped flutes, made from bamboo or cane, of the Sua from the Epulu region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The blowing end of each tube is cut at a slant and the distal end is closed by the natural node. (...

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End-blown trumpet of the Teso people of Uganda. It is a straight wooden tube with a bottle-shaped calabash bell, the whole measuring 140 cm long. The trumpets are played by men in sets of three or more as accompaniment for dancing.

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Atabule  

Hourglass drum of the Yela people of Sierra Leone. The small version of this drum is called atama.

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Atang  

Brass clapper bell of the Igede people of Nigeria. Although it is a European-style handbell, it has been incorporated into some traditional instrumental ensembles.

Article

Atenesu  

K.A. Gourlay

Drum of the Teso people of Uganda and Kenya. In Uganda it was traditionally played only by women (with the flat of the hand), while men played the ideteta, a smaller stick-beaten drum made in various sizes; four ideteta were used with the atenesu to accompany the ...

Article

Gavin Webb

Bamboo duct flute of Ghana. Its name derives from the roots atente (the type of music played) and aben (Twi: ‘whistle’ or ‘horn’). The famous Ghanaian composer and teacher Ephraim Amu developed the modern atenteben in the mid-1940s, particularly by changing it from a transverse flute capable of playing only five notes to an end-blown vertical flute with a wooden block forming a duct just below a node. He added two fingerholes (making six fingerholes and one thumbhole) to facilitate playing a two-octave diatonic scale. The modern instrument, pitched in B♭ or C, is 40 or 35 cm long. In the late 1970s and early 1980s Nana Danso Abiam, director of the Pan African Orchestra, and Henaku-Pobi, former ...