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Article

Runge  

Theodor Wohnhaas

German family of printers. From 1611 Georg Runge managed the press belonging to his father Christoph Runge the elder in the Berlin Minorite monastery. After Georg’s death (1639) his widow and heirs carried on the business until 1644, when Georg’s son Christoph Runge the younger was able to take it over. Half of the 128 musical works from Berlin (listed by Lenz) were printed on the Runge press, which was particularly active in disseminating the works of Zangius, Johannes Crüger, Hentzschel and others....

Article

Stefano Ajani

revised by Bianca Maria Antolini

(b c1643; d Feb 1, 1727). Italian publisher, printer and bookseller. From 1676 he was a member of the Venetian Printers' Guild, and in the same year he began printing thanks to the financial support of the composer Natale Monferrato, maestro di cappella of S Marco, publishing his Salmi concertati a 2 voci con violini e senza (op.11). He conducted his business, under the sign of King David playing the harp, at S Giovanni Grisostomo in the house of Monferrato. On the composer's death in 1685, Sala became the sole proprietor of the firm. In 1682 he published, anonymously, L’armonia sonora delle sonate, an anthology, edited by himself, of 12 sonatas for two violins and basso continuo by various composers.

An Indice dell’opere di musica sin hora stampate da Giuseppe Sala in Venezia (?1714) enumerates his output of psalms, motets, cantatas and sonatas, in particular those of Bassani, Monferrato, Giulio Taglietti and Corelli; he published at least 14 editions of Corelli’s first five opus numbers. The index also shows that he published psalms by Sartorio, D.F. Rossi, Cazzati and F.M. Benedetti, motets by Legrenzi, G.B. Allegri, Bonporti, G.M. Bononcini and Gasparini, cantatas by Caldara, G.L. Gregori and Albinoni and sonatas by G.B. Vitali, Legrenzi, de Castro, Corelli, Torelli, Ercole Bernabei and Benedetto Marcello. Altogether Sala printed 151 publications between ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(fl 1618–28). Italian music printer. He does not appear to be related to the contemporary librettist of the same name. He printed in Vicenza and Venice and is most important for Galeazzo Sabbatini’s Regola facile (1628), Lodovico Monte’s Vago fior (probably printed in the mid-1620s) and a series of five volumes of canzonettas (RISM ...

Article

(b Paris, 1614; d Paris, Dec 23, 1660). French type founder and printer . He was the third son of a type founder with the same first name (b Chaulnes, 1573; d Paris, 20 Nov 1648) and was his father's partner before taking over the business himself after the latter's death. Beginning in 1635, father and son created new musical fonts, taking the art of letter-cutting ‘to the highest point of perfection then possible’, as the type founder Pierre-Simon Fournier wrote 100 years later. The Sanlecques perfected three kinds of musical fonts, capable of adaptation to ‘petite, moyenne et grosse musique’. ‘These three fonts’, wrote Fournier, ‘are a masterpiece in the precision of the lines, the accuracy of the oblique lines linking the notes, and the perfection of their execution’.

On 11 February 1639 Jacques de Sanlecque the younger obtained from King Louis XIII ‘the exclusive privilege of printing plainsong for ten years’. The granting of this privilege aroused the wrath of ...

Article

Andrew R. Walkling

(d ?London, 1699). English music publisher. He is first known as an apprentice to the instrument- and bookseller John Carr, where he seems to have worked alongside his master’s son Robert compiling one of a pair of new folio songbook collections to be published by the elder Carr (Robert Carr created Vinculum Societatis, while Scott assembled Comes Amoris); both collections appeared in 1687. In that same year Scott was freed by Carr, paying a fine of 2s. 6d. to the Stationers’ Company ‘for not being turned over ye Hall’, and opened his own shop at the Miter in Bell Yard, near Temple Bar, where he sold the same books as his former master, who was situated just across Fleet Street at the Middle Temple Gate. By 1689 he had rejoined John Carr’s business (Robert Carr presumably having abandoned the trade), and from thenceforward was listed as partner in a number of Carr’s publications, some of which were also sold by ...

Article

Miriam Miller

revised by Jeremy L. Smith

(d 1624). English music printer. He was orphaned at an early age; his aunt Lucretia and her husband, printer Thomas East, adopted him and made him an apprentice. He inherited East’s business some time between 1608 and 1611. Two of his early imprints read ‘Printed by Tho. Easte, alias Snodham’, which has given rise to the conjecture that either East or Snodham changed his name, but the adoption details in East’s will refute this. Snodham seems to have inherited East’s position as the leading London music printer. He later formed a partnership with Matthew Lownes and John Browne, which lasted until his death, and printed many musical works in conjunction with them. Most of his music output is entirely original: although he acquired the copyrights of two other printers he rarely reprinted any of their works. Two exceptions were Snodham’s editions of Thomas Morley’s Madrigals to Foure Voices...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(b Pisa, c1557; d Rome, Jan 13, 1627). Italian music printer. He printed in Rome at Santo Spirito in Sassia and produced over 50 volumes. He was an undistinguished printer with an unattractive typeface, and is most important for his editions of Cifra, G.F. Anerio and Kapsberger and for Frescobaldi’s first book of ...

Article

Miriam Miller

(d 1638). English music printer. He was apprenticed to John Windet in 1591 and made free of the Stationers’ Company in 1597. He succeeded to Windet’s business in 1611, and in 1628 he acquired some of the music copyrights of Thomas Snodham. In this way Stansby inherited two of the most important music printing businesses in 17th-century London, yet he made little use of them, printing only nine music volumes in his relatively long career. Stansby’s press was astonishingly variable in the standard of its printing. Whereas Thomas Leighton’s Teares or Lamentacions of a Sorrowful Soule, published over Stansby’s imprint in 1614, is an elaborate, almost virtuoso piece of printing, his other publications appear slapdash and untidy. In fact, Stansby was severely taken to task by the Stationers’ Company over the low standard of his work, and his relations with the company deteriorated so badly, over his unruly behaviour as much as his printing, that in ...

Article

Theodor Wohnhaas

(b Steinau an der Strasse; d Frankfurt, cJan 20, 1629). German music dealer and music publisher. In 1602 he and the printer Wolfgang Richter founded a printing and publishing association in Frankfurt which existed until 1615 under the name of Typographia Musica; it was one of the leading German music publishing firms before the Thirty Years War, and concentrated on Catholic church music, also publishing numerous collections of dances and lieder. Stein published, among others, works by Giulio Belli, Finetti, Getzmann, Giovannelli, Pacelli, Jacob Regnart, Jacob Reiner, Melchior Schramm, Thomas Simpson, Lodovico Viadana and Zucchini....

Article

Theodor Wohnhaas

German family of printers and publishers. The bookbinder Johann Stern (d 1614) set up a printing and publishing business in Lüneburg, where it is still active. His sons Johann (d 1656) and Heinrich (1592–1665) established a branch at Wolfenbüttel which became one of the most important publishing concerns during the Thirty Years War; they received royal privileges and were ennobled in recognition of their achievements. The founder’s grandson Johann (1633–1712) published particularly interesting imprints of H. Rist and his circle, including works by J.W. Franck, Friedrich Funcke, F.E. and J. Praetorius, Thomas Selle and J.J. Weiland.

H. Dumrese and F.C. Schilling: Lüneburg und die Offizin der Sterne (Lüneburg, 1956)J. Benzing: Die Buchdrucker des 16. und 17. Jahrhunderts im deutschen Sprachgebiet (Wiesbaden, 1963, 2/1982)H. Walter: Musikgeschichte der Stadt Lüneburg: vom Ende des 16. bis zum Anfang des 18. Jahrhunderts (Tutzing, 1967)...

Article

Anne Schnoebelen

(fl Bologna, 1627–39). Italian publisher. Between 1627 and 1639 he printed four music publications: Costanzo Fabrizio’s Fior novello, libro primo di concerti (1627); Bartolomeo Guerra’s Il diletto del notturno (1634; the publication, however, is without the intended music); two books of Ascanio Trombetti’s Intavolatura di sonate per chitarra (1639). The last-named uses an unusual kind of tablature notation, which, as the author explained in his advice to the reader, incorporates letters of the alphabet and celestial symbols such as the sun to indicate repetitions. The same letter notation but without celestial signs is employed in the Fior novello; in this publication each page is printed half in the normal way and half upside-down so that it may be read by a person facing the first performer. All the pages are enclosed in an ornamental frame and every canzona finishes with an elegant frieze. Tebaldini also published Adriano Banchieri’s ...

Article

Hans Radke

(b Amsterdam, 13–21 Aug 1621; d Leiden, bur. Oct 8, 1653). Dutch lawyer . His father was Anthony Thijs, a merchant in Amsterdam. Thysius enrolled at the University of Leiden on 13 August 1635 and read philology and law. Between 1646 and 1648 he travelled in France and England to further his studies. Returning to Leiden he registered again on 27 August 1648 and graduated in law on 21 August 1652.

He owned an important library and founded the Bibliotheca Thysiana. In it is preserved a manuscript lutebook in French seven-line tablature. Though several scholars have suggested more hands, the volume was probably compiled by the Amsterdam minister Adrian Joriszoon Smout (b Rotterdam, c1580; d Rotterdam, Feb 1646), as a reference ‘Johan Thijs wt d' Auctie van Smoutius’ in the manuscript suggests, from his student time in Leiden (1595–1601) into at least the 1620s. With some 452 pieces, mostly for solo lute, it is the richest Dutch collection of lute music and one which shows the international aspect of musical taste in the Netherlands at that time. The manuscript contains intabulations of Dutch, English, French and Italian songs, Reformation psalms, motets and some 164 dances, mainly French, English, Italian and Dutch in origin, as well as six fantasias, including one by Francesco da Milano. Claude Le Jeune, Claude Goudimel, Orlande de Lassus, Peter Philips and Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck may be singled out among the composers of the songs on which the lute intabulations are based, and John Dowland, Robert Jones and Thomas Robinson are among the composers of the dances. A few pieces come from collections by E. Adriaensen published in Antwerp in ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(fl 1603–23). Italian printer . He specialized in music printing in Naples from 1603 to 1623, except for a brief period in the service of the Archbishop of Trani in 1617–18. He published secular vocal music by Macedonio di Mutio and Montella (1603), Gesualdo (1603 and ...

Article

Theodor Wohnhaas

(b Öhringen, c1570; d Nuremberg, March 19, 1632). German printer . He was a printer at Öhringen, but became a citizen of Nuremberg on his marriage to Ursula Adelhart in 1593. He printed or published over 150 items, of which almost a third are music. His publications include works by German and Italian composers, notably Vecchi; he was a particularly staunch promoter of the music of Austrian exiles. His work is discussed in T. Wohnhaas: ‘Nurnberger Gesangbuchdrucker und -verleger im 17. Jahrhundert’, ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(d Copenhagen, 1629). Danish music printer . He was the first Danish music printer of any importance and probably a member of a Danish printing family in Schaffhausen, where he may have been born. In 1586 he was granted a privilege to print a Danish Bible, and in 1598 he established with Mads Vingard a printing business at Copenhagen University, continuing on his own when Vingard died in 1623. Waldkirch visited the Frankfurt book fairs and took publications from Nuremberg houses to Denmark. The bulk of the 25 musical titles that can be assigned to Waldkirch (listed in Davidsson) is made up of psalm books and other liturgical volumes in Danish. He also published music by Borchgrevinck, Brachrogge and Pedersøn, who were working in Venice at that time, and Hans Kraft’s treatise, Musicae practicae rudimenta (1607).

Å. Davidsson: Dansk musiktryck intill 1700-talets mitt/Dänischer Musikdruck bis zur Mitte des 18. Jahrhunderts...

Article

Wolfgang Spindler

[Waigel]

German family of engravers and publishers .

(b Marktredwitz, bap. Nov 30, 1654; d Nuremberg, Feb 5, 1725 ). He learnt the craft of copper engraving in Augsburg (1673–81) and worked in Vienna, Frankfurt and Regensburg before settling in Nuremberg, where he married in 1698. He founded an art publishing firm which, through the heirs Tyroff and later Schmidt, existed into the 19th century; in it he also engraved and published music. His Ständebuch of 1698 follows very closely in its sections on music Michael Praetorius’s Organographia of 1618 and Kircher’s Musurgia of 1650. But it contains interesting details of the instrumental practice of the time, and stresses ‘the predominance of the organ among instruments and the leading role of Nuremberg in the construction of wind instruments’ (Krautwurst).

(b Marktredwitz, bap. July 15, 1661; d Nuremberg, bur. Sept 3, 1726...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(d Graz, May 20, 1618). Austrian printer . One of an artisan family of Nellingen bei Ulm, he was in Bavaria by 1564. He married the daughter of the printer Daser, and between 1568 and 1584 was employed as a typesetter and proof corrector by the music printer Adam Berg of Munich. In 1585 Widmanstetter travelled to Graz, where he was appointed as ‘katholischer Hofbuchdrucker’ to the court, and to the Jesuit College and the university. His salary was 100 florins a year with a free house. He remained there as a printer until his death, with a total production of over 200 titles. He exhibited at the Frankfurt book fairs between 1588 and 1596 (after which date no Graz names appear in the list for 70 years), including some music in his catalogue. His music production was not very large, and surprisingly does not include the music of the Italians who were employed at Graz. (Almost all of this was first printed in Venice.) His most famous titles were Lassus’s ...

Article

Miriam Miller

(fl London, 1584–1611). English music printer . He owned one of the most successful general printing businesses in London. He held several important offices in the Company of Stationers and ultimately became Printer to the City of London. From 1592 he printed several editions of the Sternhold and Hopkins psalter for John Day and for his son Richard Day. His publications began with John Dowland’s Lachrimae (dated 2 April 1604 in the Stationers’ register); it was financed by Thomas Adams and was one of the most important musical publications of the time. Windet’s music output is not large, numbering only a dozen volumes, including Coprario’s Funeral Teares (1606), Robert Jones’s The First Set of Madrigals (1607) and Ultimum vale (1605) and Thomas Ford’s Musicke of Sundrie Kindes (1607). Windet worked with type, and his printing was always of a high standard, distinguished by spacious layout and a clean, sharp impression. His skill must have been stretched to its limits by the eccentric demands of Tobias Hume’s ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

[Zanetti]

Italian family of printers . They were active in the 16th and 17th centuries and three of them printed music in Rome. An early member of the family, Bartholomeo de Zanetti da Bressa, printed Pier Maria Bonini’s treatise Acutissime observationes at Florence in 1520. His name gives the only indication of the probable origin of the family. The first music printer in the family was Luigi Zannetti, who worked at Rome between 1602 and 1606 and printed mostly sacred music by Agostino Agazzari, Antonio Cifra and their contemporaries. Bartolomeo, probably his son, appears to have taken over at once, for he began to produce music in 1607. Between 1618 and 1621 he was printing at Orvieto, where he produced two music books, but he later returned to Rome. His output was much larger than his father’s and included music by most contemporary Roman composers and sacred music by other Italians. He published a series of anthologies of sacred works edited by Fabio Constantini (RISM ...