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Nigel Burton and Ian D. Halligan

Nigel Burton and Ian D. Halligan

(b Dublin, May 15, 1808; d Rowney Abbey, Herts., Oct 20, 1870). Irish composer and singer. The most successful composer of English operas in the 19th century, and the only one whose fame spread throughout Europe, he gained wide international recognition with The Bohemian Girl.

Balfe received his earliest musical instruction from his father, a dancing-master and violinist, and the composer William Rooke. When his father died in January 1823, Balfe went to London and became the articled pupil of C.F. Horn, earning a living as deputy leader of the Drury Lane orchestra. He developed a fine baritone voice and made his stage début at Norwich as Caspar in a bowdlerized version of Der Freischütz. In 1825 he went to Rome, where he studied composition with Paer, and then to Milan to study counterpoint with Francesco Federici and singing with Filippo Galli. That autumn his first stage work, ...

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Dale Cockrell

(b Cleveland, OH, July 21, 1878; d Santa Ana, CA, May 3, 1927). American composer and singer. After studying music at the Cleveland Conservatory he went to New York, where he became a pianist in vaudeville theaters and a founding member of ASCAP. From 1907 to 1927 he was a staff pianist and composer at M. Witmark and Sons. His first success came with the ballad “Will you love me in December as you do in May?,” written in 1905 to lyrics by Jimmy Walker. Many of his most popular songs thereafter were composed for the Irish tenors John McCormack and Chauncey Olcott, with whom he also collaborated. Ball composed some 400 songs, including such standards as “Mother Machree” (1910), “When Irish Eyes are Smiling” (1913), and “A Little Bit of Heaven” (1914). Much of the last decade of his life was spent performing in vaudeville. His film biography, ...

Article

Leland Earl Bartholomew

revised by Franco Colussi

(b ?Crema; d Ceneda, March 24, 1616). Italian composer, singer and priest. He had been appointed priest and contralto singer at Padua Cathedral on 5 May 1577 and he served there for more than 20 years in various capacities. He was an unsuccessful candidate for the post of maestro di cappella at the cathedral in 1580, but served as a substitute in the post, being the most senior member of the choir, after Costanzo Porta’s dismissal and until the election of G.B. Mosto (from May to December 1595), and again during the latter’s absence and after his death until the election of Lelio Bertani (from March 1596 to November 1598). He had various disputes with the new maestro in April 1600. The following year, on the recommendation of Bishop Leonardo Mocenigo, he was elected maestro di cappella of Ceneda Cathedral, a post which he held, despite new disputes with a local canon, until his death. During these final years he published his ...

Article

Chadwick Jenkins

(b Lisle, IL, Nov 8, 1955). American singer, pianist, composer, and bandleader. Her father played with the Glenn Miller band and her mother was a professional blues singer. After studying psychology and classical piano at the University of Iowa, Barber returned to Chicago and began playing five nights a week at the Gold Star Sardine Bar, where she attracted varying critical attention for her husky voice and the inclusion of pop songs, including “Black Magic Woman” and “A Taste of Honey,” in her repertoire. She recorded her first album, Split (Floyd), in 1989 and her second album, A Distortion of Love (Antilles) in 1991. She subsequently moved to the independent label Premonition, which was bought by Blue Note in 1998. In 2003 Barber became the first songwriter to be awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. Under its aegis she composed a song cycle based on Ovid’s Metamorphoses. She is the subject of a documentary, ...

Article

Luca Cerchiari

[Daniel Moses]

(b New Orleans, LA, Jan 13, 1909; d New Orleans March 13, 1994). American guitarist, banjoist, singer, composer, and writer, husband of the singer Blue Lu Barker. His great-uncle Louis Arthidore was a clarinet virtuoso who played with the Onward Brass Band and his grandfather Isidore Barbarin played alto horn; on the latter’s advice he studied clarinet (with Barney Bigard) and ukulele, banjo, and guitar (with Bernard Addison). He also learned drums with Louis and Paul Barbarin. Barker performed professionally in the 1920s in Mississippi and Florida, before moving in 1930 to New York, where he played guitar in the groups of James P. Johnson, Albert Nicholas, Sidney Bechet, and Henry “Red” Allen and in the swing orchestras of Lucky Millinder, Benny Carter, and Cab Calloway. In the 1940s he switched to six-string banjo and took part in the dixieland revival. During the same period he worked with West Indian musicians and recorded for Spotlite with Sir Charles Thompson and Charlie Parker. Before returning to New Orleans in ...

Article

Joshua Rifkin

revised by Richard Sherr

[Hottinet], Houtinet, Hutinet, Jehan, Jean]

(b ?Montigny-le-Roi; fl 1510–23). French composer and singer. Under the name of ‘Jehan Barat’ he was an haut-contre at the Ste Chapelle, Paris, in 1510–12. As ‘Jean Barat dit Hottinet’ he was maître de chapelle of Langres Cathedral from 1512 to at least July 1514, and as ‘Hanotin Barra’ he returned to the Ste Chapelle in October 1523. In musical sources he is always ‘Hotinet’ or ‘Hotinet Barra’. Although some of his music is preserved in Italian sources, there is no reason to suppose he travelled to Italy. He must not be confused with Johannes Lomont [Zanin Lumon], called ‘Ottinet’, a singer from the diocese of Cambrai and member of the ducal chapel in Milan from 1473 until his death in 1493, who applied unsuccessfully for a transfer to the ducal chapel of Ferrara in 1479 and was provost of St Géry, Cambrai, from 1480 to 1489–91, residing there briefly in ...

Article

(b diocese of Limoges; fl Rome, 1537–after 1555). French composer and singer active in Italy. On 13 July 1537 ‘Leonardus Barre Lemovicensis dioec.’ was made a singer of the papal chapel. He remained there until 1555, when, together with Palestrina, he was expelled for being married. He then became maestro di cappella of S Lorenzo in Damaso, Rome. Barré was probably unrelated to Antonio Barrè, but he may have been the father of ‘Alexandro Bare, sopranus, putto’, who served in the Cappella Giulia in 1560 and 1561 and possibly from 1564 to May 1566. His nine surviving madrigals and six published motets appeared in various collections from 1539 to 1544. In a collection of 1540 for five voices he is described as a disciple of Willaert and two of his madrigals, Oime’l bel viso and Lachrime meste, were attributed to Willaert in the latter’s posthumous Madrigali a quatro voci...

Article

James Haar

(fl 1525–50). French singer and composer, active in Italy. Some sources (including RISM) have confused him with Ivo de Vento. He was one of a group of singers recruited by Jean Conseil for Clement VII's papal court in 1528, and he remained in papal service until at least 1550. During that time he may also have had some connection with the French national church of S Luigi dei Francesi. In 1540 or 1541 he visited France, and on 22 April 1545 he was granted right of succession to some French benefices. Ivo was one of six papal singers chosen to go to the Council of Trent, and during the years 1546–9 he travelled between Trent, Bologna and Rome. Two manuscripts in Perugia ( I-PEc 431, 322) contain, respectively, a canon and a set of Regole del contraponto ascribed to the ‘ecc.mo Ivo’. Whether these rules are by Ivo Barry or Ivo de Vento is unclear; whoever wrote them knew only eight modes and appears not to have read Zarlino. Five motets (in RISM 1539...

Article

Katherine K. Preston

(b Leipzig, Germany, June 25, 1897; d Jacksonville, FL, Dec 8, 1956).

American composer and pianist of German birth; naturalized American. As a child he attended the Leipzig Conservatory, studying under Carl Reinecke. He moved to the United States with his family in 1907 and made his New York recital debut the next year. He became a US citizen in 1912. Busoni inspired him to experiment with new scales, and Barth helped to invent a portable quarter-tone piano in 1928, for which he composed numerous works; he was acquainted with Ives and may have rekindled that composer’s interest in quarter-tone music. Barth performed in the United States and Europe on the harpsichord, piano, and quarter-tone piano, and was a soloist with orchestras in Cincinnati, Havana, and Philadelphia; with the Philadelphia Orchestra he served for five years under Stokowski, and performed his Concerto for quarter-tone piano on 28 March 1930...

Article

Olive Baldwin and Thelma Wilson

(b London, Sept 1, 1767; d Tottenhill, Norfolk, Dec 5, 1859). English composer and singer, daughter of François-Hippolyte and Maria Barthélemon. She went with her parents on their continental tour (1776–7) and sang before the King of Naples and Marie Antoinette. She repeated the scena which she had performed for them at her mother’s benefit concert in London in March 1778 and continued to appear with her parents as a singer, often in duets with her mother, and later as a pianist. She does not appear to have had an independent performing career or to have composed after her marriage to Edward Prentis Henslowe at St Mary’s, Lambeth, on 12 Dec 1797. Haydn was a friend of the Barthélemons and Cecilia treasured memories of his visits to them during his London years. She dedicated her keyboard sonata op.3 to Haydn and was a subscriber (listed as ‘Mrs Ed. Henslow’) to ...

Article

Randolph Love

(b Edgard, LA, Dec 24, 1920). American Trumpeter, arranger, producer, songwriter, bandleader, and singer. He started his career as a trumpeter playing with established bands led by, among others, Papa Celestin, Joe Robichaux, and Claiborne Williams before joining Fats Pichon’s ensemble, considered one of the top groups in New Orleans, in 1939. During World War II he played in the 196th AGF (Army Ground Forces) Band, where he met Abraham Malone, who taught him how to write and arrange. After the war, he formed his own band in New Orleans, which made its debut at the Dew Drop Inn and later performed at Sam Simoneaux’s club Graystone where many of the city’s top instrumental players, including the drummer Earl Palmer and the saxophonists Lee Allen and Red Tyler, were showcased.

Bartholomew is best known for his talents as an arranger and songwriter. In the 1950s and 60s he worked with many of the biggest stars of the day, including Smiley Lewis, Lloyd Price, Shirley and Lee, and Joe Turner. By the 1970s he had associations with some of rock and roll’s most established talents, including Paul McCartney, Elton John, and the Rolling Stones. His most productive association was with fats Domino, whom he met through Lew Chudd, the owner of Imperial Records, where he worked as a house arranger, an A&R man and an in-house bandleader. From ...

Article

[‘Padre Raimo’]

(b Gaeta, 1606; d Naples, July 15, 1656). Italian composer and singer. His teacher was probably G.B. de Bellis. On 19 December 1626 he joined the royal chapel at Naples as a bass and remained there until 1636. In March of that year he was admitted to the Congregazione dell'Oratorio with a salary for life for himself and his mother. He was music prefect in 1642 and from 1652 to 1656. He played some part in the posthumous publication of Scipione Dentice's Madrigali spirituali, libro secondo (Naples, 1640) which he dedicated to Cardinal Buoncompagno. He died of the plague. He was a prolific composer of church music, which the fathers of the oratory valued so highly that in 1713 one of them, Scipione Narni, arranged for the copying of the most often performed works. The motets for four choirs (in I-Nc and Nf ) are mainly homophonic, and the few contrapuntal passages are rather weak....

Article

(fl Vicenza, 1600–40). Italian composer and singer. He apparently spent his career at Vicenza. He was probably a pupil of Leone Leoni, maestro di cappella at Vicenza Cathedral from 1588 to 1607, and certainly had connections at Vicenza by 1600, since his second book of canzonettas, dedicated from there, includes pieces by Leoni and his circle. The dedication of the first to Lorenzo Beccaria suggests that Baselli may have been in his service before 1600. He evidently took holy orders between 1600, when the title-pages of his works refer to him in secular terms, and 8 November 1605, when he is first listed in the Libri dei processi of the cathedral as a priest and singer. Eitner claimed that he was maestro di cappella there, but this is not supported by the Libri, which consistently list him as a singer up to the last reference, on 19 February 1631...

Article

(b Lovere, 1593; d Bergamo, April 15, 1660). Italian singer, theorbo player, organist and composer, younger brother of Natale Bazzini. He studied at the seminary and at the Accademia della Mia at Bergamo, where he gained a reputation as an excellent singer. He studied composition with Giovanni Cavaccio and in 1614 began teaching at the academy. He served as organist of S Maria Maggiore, Bergamo, and also sang in the choir there, until he was summoned to serve the Este court at Modena. He was prominent as a singer and theorbo player in performances at the court and in the city itself, and he was given leave to perform at the court in Vienna and at Venice, Florence and Parma (1628). In 1636 he returned to the Bergamo area where he remained until his death. He was living at Zanica, very close to Bergamo, in 1637...

Article

(b Lovere; d Bergamo, 1639). Composer, organist and singer. He became a chaplain at S Maria Maggiore, Bergamo, in 1610 and sang in the choir until 1611. He was an organist at nearby Desio in 1628. In that year he published at Venice a volume of Messe, motetti et dialogi a 5, concertati...

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Frank Dobbins

(fl 1559–90). French ?composer and singer. His voice was praised in an ode by Olivier de Magny published in 1559. Fétis claimed that he composed the vocal music to Beaujoyeux’s Balet comique de la Royne (Paris, 1582/R; ed. in MSD, xxv, 1971), though Mersenne attributed it to Girard de Beaulieu. Beaujoyeux’s preface to the work explained that the queen, Louise de Lorraine, commissioned the music from ‘Sieur de Beaulieu’ who was in her service, and that he in turn sought assistance from the king’s chamber musicians, notably Jacques Salmon. Lambert was probably also the singer who took the virtuoso bass part of Glaucus in the ballet, and who, according to Fétis, was a chamber musician to Henri III in 1583–4. In 1590 Emperor Rudolf II wrote to his ambassador at Paris requesting that inquiries be made about engaging Lambert de Beaulieu whom he described as ‘a celebrated bass singer of rare voice who accompanied himself on the lyre’ and who had previously been in the service of Henri III. Fabrice Marin Caietain’s first book of ...

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(b Paris, 30 or Aug 31, 1748; d Paris, 1813). French singer and composer. Having specialized from the age of seven in soubrette roles in comedies, she made a successful début at the Paris Opéra on 27 November 1766, replacing Sophie Arnould in the title role of Silvie (P.-M. Berton and J.-C. Trial). She sang in many premières and revivals until her retirement in 1781, creating with Rosalie Levasseur the role of Iphigenia in Gluck’s Iphigénie en Tauride (1779), and although her talents were overshadowed by those of Arnould and Levasseur, she was considered an enchanting singer, actress and dancer.

Anacréon, a one-act opera and her first composition, received a private performance at the Brunoy residence of the Comte de Provence on 5 December 1781. Beaumesnil then achieved public success with her acte de ballet Tibulle et Délie, ou Les Saturnales (after L. Fuzelier: Les fêtes grecques et romaines...

Article

Patrick O’Connor

[Silly, François]

(b Toulon, Oct 24, 1927; d Toulon, December 18, 2001). French composer and singer. He studied at the Nice and Toulon conservatories and during World War II was active in the Résistance (Maquis) in Savoie. He began composing songs in 1948, which were taken up by popular singers including Marie Bizet and Edith Piaf, who sang his Je t’ai dans la peau. The poet Louis Amade encouraged him and became one of Bécaud’s regular lyricists, with Pierre Delanoë and Maurice Vidalin. Bécaud performed at the re-opening of the Olympia music hall in Paris (1954) to immediate success, becoming known as ‘Monsieur 100,000 Volts’. His songs were performed around the world in translations: Et maintenant, for example, was recorded by Frank Sinatra as What now, my love?. He attempted large-scale works, such as the cantata L’enfant à l’étoile (1961) with words by Amade. His opera ...

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(b St Georg, Upper Austria, Feb 28, 1655; d Weissenfels, Aug 6, 1700). Austrian-German composer, singer, violinist, keyboard player, music theorist and novelist. At seven his father sent him to the Benedictine monastery at Lambach, a short distance north-east of St Georg, where he began his musical education. Beer pursued further general and music studies at Reichersberg, south of Passau, as well as in Passau itself. In 1670 his parents took him to Regensburg, where they had moved to preserve their Protestant faith. As a student at the Gymnasium Poeticum Beer became a friend of his fellow student Pachelbel. He continued to study music, including composition, and he wrote the score for a school play, Mauritius imperator. At the end of his studies at the gymnasium, the city of Regensburg awarded him a scholarship to enter the university at Leipzig in 1676 as a student of theology. He soon became acquainted with the musicians there, including the Thomas Kantor Sebastian Knüpfer, and Werner Fabricius, organist at the Nikolaikirche....

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Christoph Petzsch

revised by Martin Kirnbauer

(b Sülzbach, nr Weinsberg, Württemberg, 1420; d Sülzbach, 1472–9). German poet and Meistersinger. After training under his father, a weaver, he entered the service of the imperial chamberlain, Konrad von Weinsberg, as a singer (‘fürtreter’) in the 1440s. He named as his models Muskatblüt, whom he probably met in Konrad's household, and Heinrich von Mügeln. He performed his own songs mostly at royal and noble households in southern Germany in which he was employed: the court of Albrecht Achilles, Margrave of Brandenburg, in Ansbach (1449–53, interrupted by a Scandinavian journey that took him to Copenhagen and Trondheim); the Bavarian court in Munich (1453–4); the court of King Ladislaus of Bohemia in Prague and Vienna (1455–7); in Austria, for Duke Albrecht VI (1454, 1458) and at the court of the Emperor Frederick III in Vienna (1459–65); and finally the court of the Elector Palatine Frederick I (...