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Marie Louise Göllner

(d Augsburg, 1567 or 1568). German printer. In 1522 he began printing in Augsburg, using the typefaces of Sigmund Grimm, who had in turn acquired them from Erhard Oeglin. Ulhart’s first efforts in publishing, as Schottenloher showed, were devoted almost exclusively to promoting the cause of various Reformed sects then active in Augsburg, particularly that of the Anabaptists, whose leaders included his friends Jacob Dachser and Sigmund Salminger. On 7 March 1523 in an attempt to curb sectarianism, the city council required Ulhart and seven other Augsburg printers to swear a formal oath that they would not publish anonymously. The order was rescinded shortly afterwards, and almost 200 anonymous pamphlets can be traced from typographical evidence to Ulhart’s press from the period 1523–9. In connection with the vigorous persecution of the Anabaptists he was imprisoned for eight days in 1526 and arrested again in 1528, but released for lack of evidence. In ...

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Rainer E. Lotz

German and Dutch record company . It was founded in Berlin in 1921 by the scientist Heinrich J. Kuechenmeister (1893-1971). Initially it was concerned with instruments and sound reproduction; in 1925 it marketed, through its subsidiary Tonapparate, a record player with paired pickup arms, soundboxes and horns working with a time lapse of one-sixth of a second, creating a “surround sound” (Raumklang) and a stereophonic illusion. From 1927, working with Herbert Grenzebach (1898 1992) of Elektrophon, the company set new standards of recorded quality. In 1928 a holding company was founded to finance an international expansion. In 1929 the company began issuing records. For orchestral recordings, Grenzebach used multiple microphones including one at 20 metres’ distance for echo effects. Records of standard groovecut were 30 and 25 cm, 78 r.p.m. but 20 cm discs with narrow groove were also made (on the Orchestrola label), as were 40cm discs at 33 r.p.m. with an inside start, for use with films. (Küchenmeister had been involved in developing sound film technologies since ...

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M.K. Duggan

(fl c1473–1513). Type cutter, active in Italy. On 26 September 1513 he submitted a petition to the Venetian senate requesting a 15-year privilege to print mensural music. In the petition he expressed concern that others would ‘harvest the fruits of his labour’ after he had ‘discovered the way to print mensural music [canto figurato]’ in the city where he had been a cutter of letters for 40 years. The previous privilege holder, Petrucci, was by then living in Fossombrone in the papal states. The senate awarded Ungaro an exclusive privilege, but he is not known to have exercised it. Apparently he had cut Petrucci’s music type; Petrucci had been awarded a privilege for printing music in Venice in 1498. Because of his long tenure in Venice, Ungaro may well have been responsible for the first mensural music type used in Venice in 1480 and for several of the 24 plainchant types used there between ...

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Teresa Chylińska

(b Bavaria; d Kraków, 1536). Polish printer of German birth active in Kraków. From 1510 to 1516 he worked with other printers, including Jan Haller, but later he established his own printing house. He was the first in Poland to publish music in mensural notation (printed from woodblock), in his editions of musical theorists. His total output was over 240 titles. When he died his widow continued the business until her death in ...

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José López-Calo

Spanish firm of music publishers. At the end of the 19th century Ernesto Dotesio Paynter established a music shop in Bilbao, and also engaged in music publishing. On 14 March 1900 he founded the music publishing firm Casa Dotesio, having in 1898 bought the Casa Romero, one of the most important publishing houses in Spain; this was founded by Antonio Romero y Andía in 1856, and was active throughout the second half of the 19th century. In the weeks following its foundation the Casa Dotesio absorbed other important houses, including Zozaya, Fuentes y Asenjo and, most significant, Eslava (founded by Bonifacio San Martín Eslava); the Casa Romero and Eslava are notable for having published many 19th-century Spanish works, not only in large numbers but also exquisitely printed. In the following years the Casa Dotesio continued to absorb other smaller publishers. On 26 May 1914 it changed its name to Unión Musical Española, a name that better reflected the character of the firm, since it had united all the previously disparate parts of the nation’s music publishing under one roof, and continued to do so in subsequent years. In ...

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Mark Gardner

Record company and label. The company was established in New York in 1958 as a subsidiary of the film company of the same name. It quickly assembled a remarkably comprehensive catalogue that contained a wide variety of mainstream and modern jazz. Among its most notable recordings were the excellent album Money Jungle by Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, and Max Roach, and the only recording made jointly by John Coltrane and Cecil Taylor. In addition the company released albums by Art Blakey, Roy Ayers, Count Basie, Billie Holiday, Bill Potts, Art Farmer, Curtis Fuller, Thad Jones, Mose Allison, Ruby Braff, Gerry Mulligan, the Modern Jazz Quartet, Betty Carter, Dave Lambert, Rex Stewart, Oliver Nelson, Benny Golson, Herb Pomeroy, Booker Little, Milt Jackson, Howard McGhee, Bud Freeman, Teddy Charles, Kenny Dorham, Zoot Sims, and Billy Strayhorn. This extensive repertory was produced by Tom Wilson, Jack Lewis, Alan Douglas, and George Wein. Around ...

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[UMP]

English music publishers and French music agents, active in London. It was founded in 1932 by Durand, Lemoine and Labbé to promote their catalogues, and French music in general, in the UK. James Henry Wood became director in 1936 and in the following four years several more French publishers joined the group: Costallat, Rouart-Lerolle, Joubert, Herelle, Hamelle, Enoch and Elkan-Vogel. State financial support was given in 1938 and the Centre de la Musique Française was established. From 1939 the company was run by Wood’s daughter Pauline who added the representation of several more French firms to the company. It obtained the first UK performances of works by Messiaen, Dutilleux and Duruflé, and helped organize the ‘Concerts de musique Française’ at the Wigmore Hall. Works by contemporary British composers, such as Edwin Roxburgh and Simon Bainbridge, started to be published in the 1970s and from 1982 UMP significantly expanded its role as an agent of French (and occasionally Spanish) music as well as a music publisher in its own right. It publishes the Organ Repertoire Series, and its contemporary repertory has been augmented with works by Richard Barrett, Diana Burrell, Chris Dench, Michael Finnissy and Stephen Montague....

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Nigel Simeone

Austrian firm of publishers.

Universal Edition (UE) was founded in Vienna on 1 June 1901 by three Viennese publishers: Josef Weinberger, Adolf Robitschek and Bernhard Herzmansky sr (of Doblinger). The original idea probably came from Weinberger and the banker Josef Simon (Johann Strauss’s brother-in-law). UE’s initial aims were described in the Neue Wiener Tagblatt on 9 August 1901: ‘The new music publisher is a joint venture founded by leading publishers of Austria-Hungary. … As well as publishing the classics and significant instructive works, it will also publish compositions by important modern masters’. The main purpose of UE at the outset was to provide an Austrian edition of the standard repertory which could compete successfully with those of Peters and Breitkopf & Härtel. The firm’s financial position was strengthened by the instruction from the Austrian Ministry of Education on 5 July 1901 that all Austrian music schools should buy UE publications in preference to German editions. Further stability was offered by Weinberger who undertook to purchase a substantial quantity of UE’s output. Weinberger also provided the firm with its first premises, in his own building at 11 Maximilianstrasse (later Mahlerstrasse). In ...

Article

Mark Jacobs

Multi-national recording and music publishing organization. Formed in 1996 and owned by the Canadian firm Seagram Company Ltd, Universal Music Group is one of the world’s leading music companies, with record operations in 59 countries around the world. Among the company’s record labels are A&M, Decca, Deutsche Grammophon , Geffen, GRP, MCA, Mercury , Motown, Philips, Mr , Polydor, Universal and Verve . Universal Music Publishing Group, part of the Universal Music Group, is one of the industry’s largest global music publishing operations. Its antecedents may be traced back to 1924 with the formation of the talent agency Music Corporation of America (MCA). In 1964 MCA Music Publishing began to take shape with the purchase of Leeds Music and Duchess Music. Over the next three decades, the division grew to include over 150,000 copyrights; and it represents, wholly or in part, nearly 200 publishers’ imprints. Classical, popular and educational music titles are included in its catalogue. MCA was acquired by Matsushita Electric Industrial Company Ltd in ...

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(b Moravské Budějovice, Nov 24, 1842; d Prague, Dec 4, 1919). Czech music publisher, father of Mojmír Urbánek. After his Gymnasium studies in Znojmo and Brno he was employed from 1862 by the bookseller and publisher J.L. Kober in Prague, for whom he became general manager (1866–70). In 1872 he established his own bookselling and publishing firm in Prague, where he first produced pedagogical publications and school textbooks. During the 1870s he gradually began to publish music, bringing out new works by Smetana, almost all of Fibich's compositions, and the early works of Foerster, Novák, Suk, Janáček, Křička, Axman and others. His series Dalibor, Lumír, Zora, Vesna, Lyra and Vlasta were important in the development of choral song; he also published tutors for the piano, violin, flute and harmonium as well as books on music (including Janáček's O skladbě souzvukův a jejich spojův in 1897) and the journals ...

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Zdeněk Culka

(b Prague, May 6, 1873; d Prague, Sept 29, 1919). Czech music publisher, son of František Augustin Urbánek. After an apprenticeship with his father and experience in Germany, France, England and the USA, he founded his own publishing house in Prague in 1900. The firm published music by Foerster, Novák, Suk, Říhovský and Janáček. Besides books on music Urbánek published the journal ...

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M.K. Duggan

(b Regensburg; fl 1470–88). German printer, active in Italy and Switzerland . After an unsuccessful attempt to set up a printing shop in Milan in 1470 he moved to Venice and issued several books. He returned to Milan to print between 1474 and 1478, and then went to Basle to work with Bernhard Richel from ...

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Carlos de Pontes Leça

Portuguese firm of music publishers. It was founded in Lisbon in 1914 by Valentim de Carvalho (1888–1957). In 1953 it took over the firms of Neuparth & Carneiro and Heliodoro de Oliveira. Its record company, established in 1945, issues Portuguese music and re-recordings from about 20 foreign firms. The firm also owns studios for recording film soundtracks. Until the mid-1980s Valentim de Carvalho published educational works, piano music by Portuguese and foreign composers, and the ‘Polyphonia’ collection of scores in two series, one of popular Portuguese music, the other devoted to Portuguese music from the 16th century to the 18th (works by Manuel Cardoso, Francisco Martins, Filipe de Magalhães, King João IV, Diogo Dias Melgaz, Francisco António de Almeida and Carlos de Seixas). The company now specializes in record production; its record catalogue includes works by all the major Portuguese composers.

T. Borba and F. Lopes Graça: Dicionário de música...

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Alexander Weinmann

Austrian firm of music publishers. Johann Peter van Ghelen (1673–1754), son of an Antwerp bookdealer, served an apprenticeship in Brussels and in his father’s Viennese printing works, which he took over in 1721. In 1722 he bought the Wiener Diarium (renamed the Wiener Zeitung in 1780), which remained in the firm’s ownership into the 19th century and exercised an important monopoly as the advertising organ of the book and music publishing trade until 1848. In 1725 Van Ghelen published Fux’s Gradus ad Parnassum and reissued Georg Muffat’s Apparatus musico-organisticus (1690). His eldest son Johann Leopold took over the business in 1754, succeeded in the 1760s by Jakob Anton van Ghelen, with whom the family’s male line died out in 1782. The amount of music advertised by the firm increased greatly under his management after 1770; with Trattner and Krüchten the firm was the biggest music dealer in Vienna. After Jakob Anton’s death the firm changed its name to Edle v. Ghelenschen Erben....

Article

Marie Cornaz

Flemish music publishers. Pierre-Joseph Théodore Van Ypen (d Brussels, 1 Feb 1792) and his younger brother Philippe-Henri created a music publishing house in Brussels, in partnership from 1774 to 1779 with the engraver, trumpeter, and horn player Abraham Salomon Pris (b Dieppe, 5 Oct 1740; d Brussels, 13 Sept 1800), then until 1789 with the engraver, violinist, and tenor Paul Mechtler (b Stranzendorf, c. 1723). The firm distributed its publications to Paris, Lyons, Lille, The Hague, Amsterdam, Frankfurt, and London (through Longman & Broderip). Van Ypen & Pris produced works by Conrad Breunig (opp.5 and 6), J.T. Brodeckzy (opp.2 and 3), C. Brunings (op.1), J.-B. Jadin (opp.1, 4, and 5), Pierre van Maldere (op.7), Antoine Pallet, and J.-M. Rousseau. Van Ypen & Mechtler published works by Eugène Godecharle (opp.5 and 6), Godefroid Staes (opp.1 and 2), and Carl Stamitz (op.17). Two composers had works published by both firms: W.G. Hauff (opp.3, 4, and 5) and Ferdinand Staes (opp.1, 3–7). Van Ypen was responsible for a collection of 14 ...

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Marie Cornaz

(b Brussels, 30 Jan 1731; d Brussels, 2 Aug 1794). Flemish bookseller and printer. He was the son-in-law of the Liège printer Jean-François Bassompierre and was established as a bookseller in Brussels by 5 April 1749. From 1764, Vanden Berghen regularly advertised musical compositions sold in his shop in the Brussels journal Gazette des Pays-Bas. On 11 September 1769 he took over the privilege to print librettos for the Théâtre de La Monnaie from Jean-Joseph Boucherie. Recognized as a printer of the lyric repertoire in Brussels, Vanden Berghen’s editions of librettos, which included musical supplements from 1770 to 1773, were of opéras-comiques and comédies mêlées d’ariettes by Baccelli, Dezède, Fridzeri, Grétry, and Martini.

P. Raspé and H. Vanhulst: ‘L’édition musicale’, La musique en Wallonie et à Bruxelles, ed. R. Wangermée and P. Mercier (Brussels, 1980), vol.1, 301–5M. Cornaz: ‘La Monnaie et le commerce des ouvrages lyriques à Bruxelles’, ...

Article

Andrew Flory

(Ronzoni )

(b New York, NY, April 20, 1951; d Edison, NJ, July 1, 2005). American rhythm-and-blues and pop singer, songwriter, and record producer. He was one of the most instantly recognizable African American male vocalists of the 1980s, often performing in a virtuosic style that was at once melismatic, improvisational, and precise. He began his career as a behind-the-scenes songwriter and vocalist, singing on commercial jingles, writing and collaborating on songs for other recording artists, and performing live and recorded background vocals. As backing vocalist he appeared widely, including on David Bowie’s “Young Americans” (1975), Chic’s C’est Chic (1978), Sister Sledge’s We Are Family (1979), and Roberta Flack’s Roberta Flack Featuring Donny Hathaway (1980). Vandross signed to Atlantic’s Cotillion label in the mid-1970s and released two unsuccessful albums with a self-titled group call Luther. He also worked as a vocalist with the disco-oriented band Change on several singles released during the early 1980s....

Article

Jerome F. Weber

American record company . It was founded in 1950 by Seymour Solomon with his brother Maynard, who established two distinct labels, Vanguard and Bach Guild. Three discs of Bach cantatas conducted by Jonathan Sternberg in Vienna were issued on the Bach Guild label in December 1950, and Seymour Solomon then went to Vienna to produce subsequent recordings. This label was reserved for Baroque and earlier music, while music of later periods and folk music were issued on the Vanguard label. Joan Baez and the Weavers were featured singers of folk music from the beginning. Felix Prohaska, Franz Litschauer and Anton Paulik conducted in Vienna, and Gustav Leonhardt made his recording début with Bach’s Art of Fugue on the harpsichord. Anton Heiller recorded on the organ and harpsichord and also conducted. The pianist Eugene List made his first recording for Vanguard, and Alfred Deller made a series of recordings, as soloist, with his Deller Consort and, later, as a conductor. Mogens Wöldike conducted in Vienna and later in Copenhagen, I Solisti di Zagreb and the Wiener Solisten recorded Baroque music, and Nikolaus Harnoncourt made his first recordings with the Concentus Musicus of Vienna. Vanguard recorded music conducted by Sir Adrian Boult in cooperation with Nixa and later issued recordings conducted by Sir John Barbirolli for Pye. The label’s recordings were issued in Britain by Nixa, Top Rank and, finally, Philips. The first stereo discs appeared in ...

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Jonas Westover

[Mattern, David ]

(b Lancaster, PA, Aug 24, 1949). American dj, remixer, and producer. He began his career in music as a producer in the mid-1980s after a period working in the fashion industry. Immersed in the night life in New York, he was fascinated by the work of DJs and decided to try his hand, and he eventually secured a place at Club Bassline. Working alongside Shep Pettibone, he landed numerous high-profile opportunities to remix the music of such pop stars as Madonna and Janet Jackson. Vasquez then co-established his own club, the Sound Factory, which brought him wider exposure and more offers to remix music from major labels. The club closed in 1995, and Vasquez went to other venues, the most notable being the Twilo, where he spun records in a custom-designed booth. Throughout the 1990s he released several albums of remixes, including The Future Sound of New York...