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Article

Ilona Mona

(b Stockerau, 1791; d after 1860). Hungarian music publisher, seller of books and printed music, and lithographer . He settled in Hungary in his youth as a cellist at the German theatre in Pest, but in 1837 ill-health obliged him to abandon his musical career, and after two years of uncertainty he opened his shop ‘Musical Merchandise’ in Pest. Besides working as a publisher he participated keenly in the musical life of the city, being closely connected with the Pest-Buda Musical Association; as early as 1837 he submitted to it his draft of a pension scheme for artists, which however was ‘temporarily set aside’. The contemporary press criticized him for his anti-Hungarian attitude but mentioned with approval that ‘at the time of the last Polish uprising he showed sympathy and helped the refugees’. His firm published works by the leading Hungarian composers (e.g. Ferenc Erkel’s Hungarian national anthem and opera ...

Article

Charles K. Wolfe and Travis D. Stimeling

(Wayne )

(b West Plains, MO, Aug 12, 1927; d Nashville, TN, Oct 27, 2007). American country music singer, songwriter, and record producer. As a boy, he learned country songs of the 1920s from his mother and occasionally pretended to host the Grand Ole Opry. A performance on a local radio show in 1950 led to regular appearances on KWTO, a powerful station in nearby Springfield, and this in turn led to a regular job on Red Foley’s national Ozark Jubilee television show. He signed a recording contract with RCA Victor in 1952 and had early success with “Company’s Comin’” and “Satisfied Mind.” Gospel songs such as “What would you do?” became part of his repertory, and their success encouraged his penchant for including recitation in songs. During the 1960s, thirty-one of Wagoner’s recordings reached the charts, and, by the end of the decade, he produced his own television show, ...

Article

Alistair Gilkison

New Zealand music publisher . It was established in 1967 by Douglas Lilburn at the School of Music, Victoria University of Wellington. Lilburn's aim was to make inexpensive editions of New Zealand music available to conductors, performers, students and libraries worldwide. Preference was given to works which had recordings commercially available from Kiwi Pacific Records. Most publications are facsimile reproductions of composers' original manuscripts but since ...

Article

Gareth Dylan Smith

(b Kalamazoo, MI, April 23, 1952). American drummer, producer, and composer. The drum major in his high school marching band, he majored in music for three semesters at Western Michigan University, and then joined a soul band from Fresno, California. After witnessing the Mahavishnu Orchestra in concert, he sought to learn from that band’s leader and guitarist, john McLaughlin. At 21 years of age, following lessons from McLaughlin, he played on Apocalypse as a member of the Mahavishnu Orchestra, replacing Billy Cobham. Propelled by the advice of his (and McLaughlin’s) guru Sri Chinmoy (who gave him the name “Narada,” meaning “supreme musician”) to “compete with himself,” Walden has maintained a highly successful and versatile career as a drummer and a producer, known equally for his work in each of these roles. He also contributed as a composer, vocalist, and percussionist to the Mahavishnu Orchestra’s 1976 album Inner Worlds...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(d Copenhagen, 1629). Danish music printer . He was the first Danish music printer of any importance and probably a member of a Danish printing family in Schaffhausen, where he may have been born. In 1586 he was granted a privilege to print a Danish Bible, and in 1598 he established with Mads Vingard a printing business at Copenhagen University, continuing on his own when Vingard died in 1623. Waldkirch visited the Frankfurt book fairs and took publications from Nuremberg houses to Denmark. The bulk of the 25 musical titles that can be assigned to Waldkirch (listed in Davidsson) is made up of psalm books and other liturgical volumes in Danish. He also published music by Borchgrevinck, Brachrogge and Pedersøn, who were working in Venice at that time, and Hans Kraft’s treatise, Musicae practicae rudimenta (1607).

Å. Davidsson: Dansk musiktryck intill 1700-talets mitt/Dänischer Musikdruck bis zur Mitte des 18. Jahrhunderts...

Article

Patrick Huber

(b Fly Summit, NY, Oct 24, 1889; d Little Neck, Queens, NY, Oct 15, 1963). American record producer and executive. He joined the Columbia Graphophone Company (later the Columbia Phonograph Company) in 1919 as secretary to the president of the firm and then learned the record manufacturing process. He left the company briefly to promote concerts for the Central Concert Company of Detroit, but returned in 1921 as Columbia’s A&R man in charge of the emerging race catalog and, shortly thereafter, also the hillbilly catalog. Like Ralph S. Peer, his counterpart at OKeh and later Victor, Walker was a pioneer of talent-scouting and field-recording expeditions in the American South; beginning in 1925, he arranged dozens of field-recording sessions, using portable recording equipment in southern cities including Atlanta, New Orleans, Dallas, Memphis, and Johnson City, Tennessee. Walker supervised the recordings of many of Columbia’s blues and hillbilly stars of the 1920s, including Bessie Smith (whom he also managed), Clara Smith, Charlie Poole and the North Carolina Ramblers, Gid Tanner and His Skillet Lickers, and the Allen Brothers. Under Walker’s leadership, Columbia became the nation’s leading record label for blues and hillbilly music during the 1920s, and he eventually became a vice president of the company....

Article

(b Orlinda, TN, Feb 16, 1924). American music administrator. She was the guiding hand behind the Country music association (CMA) for its first three decades, contributing significantly to the genre’s tremendous growth in the 1960s and 1970s. Born in the Black Patch tobacco-producing region of north-central Tennessee, she went to Nashville during World War II to work in the Vultee Aircraft plant and attend college. She held a number of administrative and public relations positions before accepting a job at the newly formed CMA in 1958, although she was not particularly familiar with country music and often joked about her lack of musical inclination. Walker-Meador became the organization’s sole employee in 1959, when its executive director Harry Stone was released owing to lack of funds. She soon became the public face of the CMA, single-handedly administering a complex public relations campaign that included organizing the annual banquet that would become the televised CMA Awards, coordinating a national series of benefit concerts, producing a monthly newsletter (...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?1665 or 1666; d London, March 13, 1736). Music seller, engraver, printer, publisher and instrument seller, probably of Irish extraction. He was established in London by about 1690. On 24 June 1692 he was appointed musical instrument-maker-in-ordinary to William III in succession to John Shaw, whose trade sign of ‘The Golden Harp and Hoboy’ he also adopted; in the same year he married Mary Allen, by whom he had 15 children, of whom only three survived infancy.

In 1695, when he began publishing, Walsh had few rivals in the trade. John Playford was dead, and his son Henry evidently lacked the initiative to maintain the family firm as a flourishing concern. Thomas Cross, while popular for his introduction of the engraved single-sheet song, was concerned more with engraving than publishing. Walsh was quick to take advantage of the situation, and engraved music appeared from his premises on a scale previously unknown in England. In addition to works by English composers he printed much popular continental music (including Corelli’s sonatas) which he often copied from Dutch editions. From about ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b London, Dec 23, 1709; d London, Jan 15, 1766). English music seller, printer, publisher and instrument maker . He probably assumed control of the business of his father, John Walsh (i), in about 1730, when the relationship with the Hare family apparently ceased and the numbering of the firm’s publications started. On 8 May 1731 Walsh succeeded to the appointment of instrument maker to the king. Although John Johnson and other rivals arose, the business continued to prosper and maintained its excellent engraving and paper. Burney characterized Walsh (ii) as ‘purveyor general’. Walsh fully developed the firm's relationship with Handel, publishing almost all his later works and in 1739 being granted a monopoly of his music for 14 years. About half of Walsh's output was of Handel compositions. The firm also sold other publishers' works, and bought up the stock of smaller firms when they ceased trading. Many of Walsh's apprentice engravers later set up on their own, including John Caulfield, Thomas Straight and Thomas Skillern. Walsh, who never married, was elected a governor of the Foundling Hospital in ...

Article

Kari Michelsen

Norwegian firm of music publishers , founded in Christiania (now Oslo). It was the leading music firm in the country in the 19th century. It started as a modest shop for strings, run in his home by the German emigré Carl Warmuth sr (1811–92). According to the firm, the business was established in 1843, but it seems that the actual date was a few years later. Wind and bowed stringed instruments and sheet music were added to the business, which moved in 1861 to larger premises. Its scope radically increased with Warmuth’s son Carl jr (1844–95); he joined the firm and took over the management in 1874. He was an exceptionally enterprising and efficient businessman and the firm bought up almost all its competitors: Lindorff & Co. in 1864, Edvard Winther in 1878, Hermann Neupert in 1879, A.M. Hanche in 1881 and J.D. Behrens in 1890.

The firm’s first publication appeared in ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by Peter Ward Jones

(b 1678; d London, Sept 26, 1763). English bookseller and publisher . He was established in Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, by 1713, when he began to issue editions of classical authors. From the outset he often published in conjunction with Jacob (later Jacob and Richard) Tonson, issuing plays, librettos and miscellaneous works. The introduction of the ballad opera at Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre gave Watts a brisk trade in the publication of the operas performed there. He issued the first and later editions of The Beggar's Opera (1728), and after this practically the whole of the series of ballad operas (more than 27 altogether) as soon as they were performed. These editions present the airs for the songs, printed from engraved woodblocks, as an appendix, and are especially valuable for giving the old names of the tunes. Another important work is the six-volume The Musical Miscellany (...

Article

Member of Lloyd-Webber family

(b London, March 22, 1948). Composer and producer, son of William Lloyd Webber.

He was educated at Westminster School and the RCM. From an early age he wrote incidental music for shows with his toy theatre; at Westminster he wrote music for school revues. In the April of 1965 he met the lyricist Tim(othy Miles Bindon) Rice with whom he wrote the unperformed musical The Likes of Us and some pop songs. Their first success came with the commission to write a choral work for Colet Court School; the resulting pop cantata, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, was gradually extended to a full-length show and has become a constant of both amateur and professional repertories. They released the concept album for Jesus Christ Superstar (1970), which became one of the bestselling albums of that time in both the UK and USA; it was then developed for stage and opened in New York (...

Article

Weezer  

Gillian Turnbull

Rock band. It formed in Los Angeles in 1992. Members of a lineup intact since 2001 include Rivers Cuomo (b New York, NY, 13 June 1970; lead vocals, guitar), Brian Bell (b Knoxville, TN, 9 Dec 1968; vocals, guitar), Scott Shriner (b Toledo, OH, 11 July 1965; bass guitar, vocals, keyboards), and Patrick Wilson (b Buffalo, NY, 1 Feb 1969; drums, vocals). Original guitarist Jason Cropper was replaced by Bell during the band’s early recording years; other past members include Matt Sharp and Mikey Welsh. Josh Freese has also acted as drummer for the band; there is discussion among fans as to whether he will become a permanent member.

The band achieved success early in their career with the release of the single “Buddy Holly” (1994); its music video, directed by Spike Jonze and interspersed with clips of the television show Happy Days, was widely acclaimed. For their first seven albums, Weezer was signed to Geffen (DGC) Records; they moved to Epitaph in ...

Article

Wolfgang Spindler

[Waigel]

German family of engravers and publishers .

(b Marktredwitz, bap. Nov 30, 1654; d Nuremberg, Feb 5, 1725 ). He learnt the craft of copper engraving in Augsburg (1673–81) and worked in Vienna, Frankfurt and Regensburg before settling in Nuremberg, where he married in 1698. He founded an art publishing firm which, through the heirs Tyroff and later Schmidt, existed into the 19th century; in it he also engraved and published music. His Ständebuch of 1698 follows very closely in its sections on music Michael Praetorius’s Organographia of 1618 and Kircher’s Musurgia of 1650. But it contains interesting details of the instrumental practice of the time, and stresses ‘the predominance of the organ among instruments and the leading role of Nuremberg in the construction of wind instruments’ (Krautwurst).

(b Marktredwitz, bap. July 15, 1661; d Nuremberg, bur. Sept 3, 1726...

Article

Alexander Weinmann

revised by Nigel Simeone

(b Lipto St Miklos, Moravia, May 6, 1855; d Vienna, Nov 8, 1928). Austrian music publisher . On 1 November 1885 he founded a music publishing firm in Vienna in partnership with Carl Hofbauer. In 1890 Weinberger started to publish on his own. His earliest significant work was the lavish Album der Wiener Meister, issued for the International Music and Theatre Exhibition in Vienna in 1892 and including pieces by Brahms, Bruckner, Goldmark, Johann Strauss (ii), Suppé and others. In 1897 Weinberger was a founder-member of the Gesellschaft der Autoren, Komponisten und Musikverleger (AKM), one of the earliest societies of its kind; for the rest of his life he was either its chairman or its honorary president. Also in 1897 Weinberger began to publish works by Mahler, starting with the Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen; this was followed by the First Symphony (1899), Des Knaben Wunderhorn (1900...

Article

W. Thomas Marrocco and Mark Jacobs

(b Stal′noye, Ukraine, March 10, 1904; d Manhattan, November 19, 1992). American music publisher . An accomplished musician, he started publishing music in 1940 in New York. He was director of the Am-Rus Music Corp., in charge of Soviet music distribution in the USA, and in this capacity arranged the first American performances of works by Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Kabalevsky and Myaskovsky. He obtained the highest ever hire fee ($10,000) in ...

Article

Welcker  

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

English family of music publishers, printers and music sellers , established in London. The business was founded in or before 1762 by Peter Welcker (d London, 1775), who published many important works, including much of J.C. Bach's instrumental music, works of the Mannheim school (using plates from Hummel of Amsterdam) and several of the early volumes of Thomas Warren's Collection of Catches, Canons and Glees. At his death the business was continued by his widow Mary Welcker (d London, early 1778), probably with her son-in-law James Blundell as manager. Her executors carried on the business for a few months after her death, but by July 1778 Blundell had taken over the business, and in the following year Robert Bremner purchased some of her plates and music. John Welcker (fl 1775–c1785), the son of Mary and Peter Welcker, set up his own business as a music seller and publisher in ...

Article

M.K. Duggan

(b Strasbourg; fl 1472–99). Alsatian printer, active at Basle . He established his printing shop in 1472, working with the first printer at Basle, Berthold Ruppel, and with Bernhard Richel. His name appears with Jacob von Kilchen’s (‘impensis spectatissimorum virorum MW et JK’) on a spectacular series of printed music books of 1488: a gradual, two antiphonals, missals, and agendas. Another gradual of about 1486 has been attributed to him and a Missale sarumburiense was shipped to England in 1489 at the expense of Wenssler, Kilchen and Hans Wiler. In 1490 financial disaster forced Wenssler to sell his shop; he fled Basle and spent the next decade printing for others in Speyer and Basle and on his own in Cluny, Macon and Lyons. He was allowed to return in 1499. Several missals, vigils and psalters with printed music are attributed to him, but ownership of his types after 1490...

Article

Alexis Chitty

revised by Peter Ward Jones

(b Bremen, 1797; d Eastbourne, March 15, 1885). English music publisher of German origin . He emigrated to London, where, with a piano maker named William Stodart, he established the firm of Wessel & Stodart in 1823. They began as importers of foreign music, but also issued their own publications from 1824. Their main interest was piano music, often issued in the form of periodical albums, and besides the usual popular arrangements of operatic airs and dance music they published the sonatas of Beethoven and Mozart, and the works of piano virtuosos such as Heller, Henselt and Thalberg. They also helped at an early date to promote the music of Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Gade, Liszt and others in England. Stodart retired in 1838 and Wessel continued the business alone until 1839, when he took in Frederic Stapleton as a partner. From 1833 they began to publish Chopin's works and from ...

Article

Alyssa Woods

(Omari )

(b Atlanta, GA, June 8, 1977). American rapper, singer, and record producer. Kanye West burst onto the rap scene in 2004 with his debut album, The College Dropout, and has established himself as one of the industry’s most prominent artists. Immersed in the Chicago hip-hop scene, he learned to sample and program beats at the age of 15. While studying at Chicago State University, West began selling his beats to prominent rappers and decided to drop out of school to devote more time to his music career. West’s reputation as a producer was solidified by his work on Jay-Z’s album, The Blueprint (2001), where his sped up sample of the Jackson Five’s “I Want You Back” on the song “Izzo (H.O.V.A.)” helped launch the single to the Billboard Top 10. West adopted the technique of speeding up samples from the Wu Tang Clan’s RZA, making this his signature sound....