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Article

Richard Griscom

(b Sheboygan, WI, June 29, 1943). American music librarian, educator, and developer of music technology. Fenske received degrees in music education (BME 1965) and musicology (PhD 1973, with minor in library science) from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. While in graduate school at Wisconsin, he began his work in music libraries (1967–71). In 1971, he moved to Indiana University, where he was associate head music librarian (1971–4), head of the Music Library and professor of music (1974–98), and director of information and technology services (1995–8). In cooperation with the School of Library and Information Science, Fenske developed a dual Master’s degree program to train music librarians, and during his tenure the program graduated over fifty students.

Fenske’s interest in computer and networking technologies led to the founding in 1990 of the Variations Project, which developed software to offer near-CD-quality audio streaming over the library’s computer network beginning in ...

Article

Deborah Campana

(b Kansas City, MO, May 8, 1941). American music librarian. He studied music theory at Baylor University (BM 1962) as well as musicology (MA 1964) and library science (MLS 1975) at the University of Iowa. Fling spent his entire academic career at the Cook Music Library, Indiana University, beginning as Reference Librarian (1976–87), and later developing all facets of the music collection as Head of Collection Development and Acquisitions (1987–2006). In addition, he was Deputy Head (1995–2006) and Acting Head (1996–7, 1998). He also taught, as part of a team, the Seminar in Music Librarianship in the School of Library and Information Science (1979–2007). Upon retirement, he was named Librarian Emeritus.

Michael Fling has made extensive contributions to the profession of librarianship, most notably in music acquisitions and publications. For the Music Library Association, he served as editor of the Index and Bibliography Series (...

Article

Dennis Libby

revised by John Rosselli

(b San Giorgio Morgeto, Calabria, Oct 12, 1800; d Naples, Dec 18, 1888). Italian librarian, musicologist, teacher and composer. The varied activities of his career were dominated by a single theme: the preservation and glorification of the Neapolitan musical tradition. At 12 (or 15) he entered the Naples Conservatory, where he was a fellow student of Bellini, who became his closest friend and the object of his intense devotion. He was made archivist-librarian there in 1826 and (perhaps his most important achievement) acquired a large part of the library’s rich holdings. He also served as director of vocal concerts and singing teacher there. His widely praised Metodo di canto (Naples, ?1840; Milan, 1841–3, enlarged 3/?1861) was conservative in tendency, claiming to be based on the precepts of the castrato Crescentini, then director of the conservatory’s singing school, and intended to restore the ‘antico bello’ of ‘the only true tradition of Italian song’, that of Scarlatti, Porpora and Durante, which had been displaced by ‘la moda barocca’ of the present age. Florimo composed in all genres except the dramatic, but apart from a ...

Article

(b Padua, Jan 10, 1653; d Modena, Nov 30, 1732). Italian librettist, poet, architect and librarian. From 1691 to 1720 he was a curator of the public library at Padua, where he was a member and principe of the Accademia dei Ricovrati. Family quarrels drove him to spend the rest of his life in Modena. Buildings designed by him were erected or started in Padua, Vicenza, Stra and Modena from 1717 onwards. 11 operas to librettos by him, set by C.F. Pollarolo, Alessandro Scarlatti, Caldara and Luigi Mancia, were performed at the Teatro Grimani a S Giovanni Grisostomo, Venice, 1694–6 and 1704–8. He wrote a further libretto for Padua, which was first performed at the Teatro Obizzi in the spring of 1695. All these librettos are in five acts and treat mythological or historical subjects. Some are called tragedies, some (from 1704) tragicomedies; they often include choruses and ballets. Like those of Morselli, Silvani and Zeno they adhere to the predominantly serious, stylistically elevated manner of libretto writing that paid homage to Aristotle and the French classical dramatists. Seven oratorio texts by Frigimelica Roberti, in two parts or five acts and with music by C.F. Pollarolo and Badia, were performed between ...

Article

Paula Morgan

revised by Mary Wallace Davidson

(William)

(b Queens, NY, Feb 27, 1925; d Dallas, TX, March 7, 1984). American music librarian and educator. After graduating from Queens College, CUNY (BA 1950), and Columbia University (MS 1953), he joined the faculty of Brooklyn College Conservatory of Music, CUNY, in 1956 to establish the music library. At the time of his death he was assistant director of the Conservatory, and also a member of the doctoral faculty at the CUNY Graduate Center. In 1968 he cofounded the joint MLA/AMS Translations Center.

Gerboth was a leader in the Music Library Association (MLA) during a period of growth and consolidation, serving as president from 1969 to 1971. As chair of its publications committee (1963–9), he initiated numerous projects in bibliography and librarianship, including the MLA Index Series (1964–), the Manual of Music Librarianship (1966), MLA’s Newsletter (1969–), and the ...

Article

Beatriz Martínez del Fresno

(b Madrid, Dec 20, 1886; d Madrid, Dec 22, 1973). Spanish composer, librarian, critic and musicologist. He studied with his father and Antonio Santamaría, and from 1899 at the Madrid Conservatory with Andrés Monge, Manuel Fernández Grajal, Pedro Fontanilla, Felipe Pedrell and Emilio Serrano. Gómez won first prizes in harmony (1902), piano (1904) and composition (1908). He also studied history at Madrid University, earning a first degree (1907) and a doctorate (1918). After working as an arranger at the Teatro Real (1908–11) he was director of the Toledo Archaeological Museum (1911–13), head of the music section of the National Library (1913–15) and librarian of the Madrid Conservatory (1915–56). Among the subjects he taught was composition, which he taught to the group of composers known as the Generation of ’51.

Backed by Bretón and Bartolomé Pérez Casas at the beginning of his composing career, Gómez composed more than 100 works, some of which won national awards. His music wavers between neo-Romanticism (...

Article

Bonna Boettcher

(Ellen)

(b New York, Dec 8, 1954). American music librarian. She holds the BA in music from SUNY Binghamton (1976) and the MSLS from Columbia University (1978). She was named the vice president for library and information resources at the Juilliard School in 2003 (after serving as head librarian and associate vice president for library and information resources), responsible for managing the school’s library and archives, including the Juilliard Manuscript Collection; she also serves as chair of the doctoral governance committee and teaches courses in research techniques. She has focused on developing the Juilliard library into a major research collection and has overseen its significant physical expansion. She has also held librarian positions at Mannes College of Music, the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center, and the American Music Center. Her primary scholarly work has focused on building, describing, and preserving music collections, the Music Library Association (MLA), and music research skills. She has held many MLA offices, including president (...

Article

Deborah Campana

(b Chattanooga, TN, Sept 14, 1956). American music librarian. He attended the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (BM 1978) and studied musicology (with a minor in percussion) as well as library science at Indiana University (MM, MLS 1981). He served as Music Cataloger and Recorded Sound Services Librarian (1981–5) and Music Technical Services Librarian (1985–8) at Northwestern University. He next worked at the University of Louisville, where he became Head of the Dwight Anderson Music Library (1988–97; tenured 1995), and then at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where he served as Music Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Administration (1997–2004). Griscom currently serves as Head of the Otto E. Albrecht Music Library and Eugene Ormandy Music and Media Center at the University of Pennsylvania (2004–), where he is Project Leader of ScholarlyCommons@Penn, and Interim Coordinator for Humanities Collections (...

Article

Paula Morgan

revised by Jim Farrington

(b New Rochelle, NY, Dec 16, 1916; d Castine, ME, April 10, 2012). American discographer, editor, and writer on music. A self-taught musician, he studied psychology at Yale University (BA 1939) and Columbia University (1939–40). He held a wide variety of positions, including classical music program annotator for NBC (1942–8); music director of the classical division of Mercury Records (1948–56), where he oversaw the “Living Presence” recordings; director of the American-Scandinavian Foundation’s music center (1950–57); music editor of Hi-Fi Review (1957–63) and contributor to its successor, Stereo Review, until it ceased publication in 1998; and president of CRI (1963–7). A Fulbright Teaching Fellowship in 1956 allowed him to teach advanced recording techniques at the University of Copenhagen. A champion of contemporary music, he published the first discography of Charles Ives in 1964. In 1967 he became head of the Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound at the New York Public Library. After his retirement in ...

Article

Mark McKnight

(b Little Rock, AR, Aug 30, 1909; d Fort Worth, TX, Aug 12, 2002). American music librarian. She studied mathematics and piano performance at Texas Christian University (BA, BM 1930) and library science at the University of Illinois (BS 1933). In the summer of 1938 she enrolled in Richard Angell’s “Music Library Administration” course at Columbia University and remained there the following academic year, studying library service (MS 1939). Following a year as cataloger at the University of Texas in Austin, she was invited to North Texas State Teachers College in Denton (now University of North Texas), to establish a music library for the university, the first full-time music library position in Texas. In order to increase her knowledge of music history and literature, Heyer took a leave of absence for graduate study in musicology at the University of Michigan, where she received her Masters degree in ...