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Article

Walter Blankenburg

(b Schneeberg, Saxony, April 4, 1515; d Königsberg, Nov 27, 1585). German jurist and humanist. He was one of the children of a Saxon mine inspector. In 1527 he went to school and later to university in Leipzig; in 1535 he took the Master of Arts degree and remained as a teacher at the university until 1550, when he became Hofmeister (private tutor) to two noble students at Leuven University and, from 1551, at the University of Paris. On returning to Leipzig in 1556, he was appointed councillor and chancellor to the Prince of Meissen (Saxony). In 1562 he went to Bologna to study at the university, taking the degree of Doctor of Laws, and in 1563 he was called by Duke Albrecht of Prussia to the chair of law at Königsberg University, where he stayed until his retirement in 1580.

Lobwasser's great achievement was the translation of the Genevan (or Huguenot) Psalter into German, following the original verse forms exactly, in the years immediately after its completion in ...

Article

Jennifer Spencer

[Lïsenko, Nikolay Vital′yevich]

(b Hrynky, nr Kremenchug, Poltava district, 10/March 22, 1842; d Kiev, 24 Oct/Nov 6, 1912). Ukrainian composer, pianist, conductor and folksong collector. He was first taught the piano by his mother, but was taken to Kiev at the age of nine to have lessons with Panochini and to study theory with Nejnkevič. He attended the Gymnasium at Khar′kiv and then took a course in natural sciences, first at the university there, and then at the University of Kiev (1860–64). He continued his musical education with Wolner, Dmitriyev and Wilczyk, and in Leipzig with Reinecke and Richter. As a child he had been deeply impressed by songs he heard peasants singing, and his nationalist sympathies were stimulated by a volume of Shevchenko's poetry given to him by his grandfather (at the age of 19 he was a coffin bearer at Shevchenko's funeral). As a student he was involved with the anti-tsarist movement, and was much influenced by the philosophers Belinsky, Herzen and Chernïshevsky. His beliefs, however, did not prevent him from becoming a legal adviser in the Imperial Civil Service, a post he relinquished with relief after two years....

Article

Rodney Hall

(b Melbourne, April 21, 1915; d Brisbane, April 19, 1985). Australian folksong collector and poet. After graduating in modern languages from Cambridge University, Manifold became active in Baroque music circles in London. He served with the intelligence corps during World War II. His first book of poems was published in New York in 1946 and soon afterwards he wrote a handbook on the history and repertory of the recorder, The Amorous Flute (London, 1948). On his return to Australia he completed the innovative study, The Music in English Drama, from Shakespeare to Purcell (London, 1956), which for many years was the standard reference book used by English theatre companies. His major musical contribution began in the 1950s when he started to collect Australian folksongs. These songs were published in broadsheet editions as Bandicoot Ballads (Lower Fern Tree Gulley, Victoria, 1955) and The Penguin Australian Song Book...

Article

( b Cartagena, Oct 24, 1863; d St Blasien, Baden, Feb 27, 1929). Spanish composer, folklorist and music critic . His father was a captain of a marine infantry battalion, and he began his musical training under a military bandsman in his father's regiment. In the early 1880s, while stationed in Madrid as a second lieutenant, he began to study harmony, counterpoint, fugue and composition with Ruperto Chapí, remaining his sole disciple until Chapí's death in 1909. During these years he devoted most of his spare time to composition. He was a member of the Sociedad Filarmónica Madrileña (1901–11) and a founder-member of La Asociación Wagneriana Madrileña (inaugurated 4 May 1911). He was music critic for the periodical El mundo (1907–15) and also contributed articles to ABC. He also conducted numerous concerts of the Sociedad de Conciertos, Madrid, and the S Cecilia choral society. In ...

Article

Laura Otilia Vasiliu

[ Karol ]

( b Chernivtsi, [now in Ukraine], Oct 20, 1819; d Lviv, Ukraine, May 21, 1897). Armenian-Polish-Romanian pianist, composer, folklorist, and teacher .

He studied the piano in Paris with Frédéric Chopin and composition with Anton Reicha (1844–7). He toured as a concert pianist in Austria, France, Italy, and Russia. He was a professor at and head of the Lviv Conservatory from 1858 to 1888. He then founded his own school. Among his students were the Romanians Ciprian Porumbescu, Paul Ciuntu, and Constantin Gros, but also the musician pianists of Lviv that would be his disciples—Raoul Koczalski, Moriz Rosenthal, and Aleksander Michałowski. He collected, notated, and processed Romanian and Polish folk songs (1848–54). He published a 17-volume critical edition of Chopin’s work (Leipzig, 1879). He used several verified sources, most of which were written or corrected by Chopin himself. His editions of Chopin’s works were first published in America in ...

Article

(b Igara, western Uganda, March 21, 1926; d Kampala, June 21, 1995). Ugandan composer, poet, writer and folklorist . Largely self-taught, he took positions as a teacher of music and literature at several teachers’ colleges in western Uganda and at St Kalemba’s Catechetical Centre, retiring in his 50s to concentrate on creative writing. His most valued musical work consisted of providing a new musical liturgy for the Catholic church in western Uganda. The hymnbook Mweshongorere Mukama (‘Let us Praise the Lord’, Kampala, 1961, 6/1987), adopted for use throughout the diocese and further afield, contains 79 of his compositions. A second unpublished collection of the same title contains a further 65 settings, including arrangements of Latin, French and English hymns. Despite ill-health and poverty his prolific output included 6 masses, partsongs, liturgical settings (in Latin, French, English and his native tongue Runyankore), novels, folktales, poetry, plays and other historical and linguistic contributions. All but 12 titles remain unpublished and in the care of the Omuhanda gy’Okumanya Publishing Association, Mbarara....

Article

Pamela J. Willetts

( bc 1580; d 1625). English clergyman and amateur musician . He is best known as the compiler and scribe of the manuscript anthology Tristitiae remedium, 1616 ( GB-Lbl Add.29372–7), a major source for anthems, motets and madrigals by English composers of the period. Each partbook has an engraved title-page. Tristitiae remedium is a good, early, and in some cases unique, source for the works of Thomas Tomkins, Peerson, Ward, Lupo, Ferrabosco (ii) and John Milton senior. The manuscript Lbl Add.29427 is a collection of rough drafts, partly in Myriell's hand, for Tristitiae remedium. Other manuscripts partly written by him are Och 44, 61–7, 459–62. The manuscript Och 67 also contains two items in the hand of Thomas Tomkins, and Och 44 music in the autograph of Benjamin Cosyn. Myriell's friendship with Tomkins is confirmed by the latter's dedication to him of When David heard in the Songs (London, 1622...

Article

Ron Pen

(b Louisville, KY, April 28, 1892; d nr Lexington, KY, March 1, 1980). American Folksinger, folk-music collector, and composer. He began collecting and transcribing songs at age 14 and composed his first song, “Go ’way from my window,” in 1907. A skilled pianist upon his graduation from Louisville’s Dupont Manual High School, he continued his studies at Cincinnati Conservatory and the Schola Cantorum in Paris. A pilot with the US Army Signal Corps during World War I, he published two collections of wartime songs, Singing Soldiers (1927) and The songs my mother never taught me (1929).

While based in New York, Niles toured internationally with contralto Marion Kerby from 1929 to 1933, arranging African American and Appalachian material for their repertoire. He also began publishing his arrangements and compositions with Carl Fischer and G. Schirmer and recording for Victor’s Red Seal label. From 1931 to 1934...

Article

Mireille Barrière

(b Ottawa, Sept 7, 1892; d Montreal, Sept 20, 1958). Canadian composer and folklorist . He studied the piano and the organ in Ottawa with Amédée Tremblay and piano in Montreal with Alfred Laliberté. From 1915 he collaborated with Charles Marchand on collecting and arranging folksongs, and he was also active as a teacher, orchestral pianist and accompanist. From 1927 to 1930 he took part in the festivals commissioned by the Canadian Pacific Railway and became their joint musical director with Harold E. Key in 1930; it was for these that his ballad operas, based on Canadian folklore and including many folksongs, were written. His operetta Philippino was broadcast in 1943. O’Brien became a priest in 1952.

ballad operas unless otherwise stated

Article

Kerala J. Snyder

revised by Geoffrey Webber

(b Magdeburg, bap. March 17, 1664; d Wolfenbüttel, June 6, 1735). German music collector, singer and composer. The son of a brewer, he began his musical education with the Magdeburg Kantor Johann Scheffler, spent two years (1678–80) at the Thomasschule in Leipzig under Johann Schelle and continued his studies at the Johanneum in Hamburg. There he began his professional career as alto and later tenor soloist in the city's Kantorei, interrupted by a year at the university in Leipzig (1683–4). From 1686 to 1689 he worked as a tenor at the court in Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel; during this time he lived with the Kapellmeister Johann Theile, receiving lessons in composition from him and in singing from the two Italian castratos in residence at the court. He himself became Kapellmeister in 1689 to Duke Christian Albrecht of Schleswig-Holstein and moved to Gottorf Castle with his new bride, Magdalena Darnedden, daughter of a Brunswick brewer....