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Theodore Karp

(d after March 1229). French trouvère. He was Seneschal of Poitou, and of a noble family with holdings in Blason and Mirabel; his uncle, Maurice, was Bishop of Poitiers. Thibaut was among the negotiators of the truce of 1214 between King Philip II Augustus of France and King John of England. Together with Hue de la Ferté, he was among the nobles at the coronation of Louis IX (St Louis). He took part in a crusade against the Moors in ...

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Roger Bowers

(fl c1370). English musician. The sole extant reference to his work occurs in the text of the motet Sub Arturo/Fons citharizancium/In omnem terram (see Alanus, Johannes, perhaps composed in 1372 or 1373. Its upper voice praises some 14 English musicians, recording a lively and productive group of composers, singers and instrumentalists then active in court circles, of whom Richard Blich was one: his ‘works please both holy people and rulers’. All the named musicians so far identified were active at some point in their careers in the English Chapel Royal between about ...

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Thomas B. Payne

(b Brittany (?Blois), c1135; d ?France or ?London, 1211/12). French writer of Latin lyric poetry. He studied at Chartres, Tours, in Paris in the 1140s, possibly under John of Salisbury, and for a short time at Bologna. He tutored William II of Sicily in Palermo (...

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Theodore Karp

(fl 1180–1200). French trouvère. Although the legend recounting the part he supposedly played in freeing King Richard the Lionheart from captivity is traceable to manuscripts of the 13th century, it is accurate only with respect to period. The trouvère's identity is a matter for speculation. Because the poet is never named Messire or Monseignor in the manuscripts, he would seem to be at most a younger son of lesser nobility, and perhaps a commoner. On the other hand, it has also been suggested that he is identifiable with the powerful Jehan II de Nesle. ...

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Gianluca D’Agostino

(b Certaldo, 1313; d Certaldo, 1375). Italian poet and writer. Along with Dante and Petrarch he was among the most influential literary figures in medieval Italy. The illegitimate son of a Tuscan merchant, in 1327 he moved with his father to Naples. There he was introduced into the French-influenced court of King Robert of Anjou, and this milieu influenced his first writings: the ...

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Theodore Karp

(b c1165; d between Oct 1, 1209 and Feb 2, 1210). French trouvère. Though a poet by profession, he may have been attached to the magistracy of Arras as sergeant. He apparently enjoyed the protection of the mayor, Sauwalon Huchedieu, and other wealthy people. He was an original, versatile and influential writer whose works include the ...

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Gordon A. Anderson and Anna Maria Busse Berger

(b Noordwijk, early 14th century; d Rijnsburg, 1367). Dutch priest and music theorist. He attended university at Oxford and Paris, and after completion of studies in law became a priest. From 1358 to his death he was parish priest in Rijnsburg. He wrote two treatises. ...

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Kurt von Fischer and Gianluca D’Agostino

( fl northern Italy, 1340–?1386). Italian composer and music theorist. He belonged to the first generation of Italian trecento musicians.

Despite his important and influential position in early trecento music, no archival information has come to light about him. He was evidently a native of Bologna. According to ...

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Kurt von Fischer and Giuliano Di Bacco

(d Florence, 1414). Italian craftsman and composer. He was a painter in Florence of wedding cassoni. Around 1379 he was a pupil of polyphonist Andreas de Florentia, and from 1375 to 1395 a leading member of the Compagnia dei Laudesi of S Zanobi. Bonaiuto had a wife and children but around ...

Article

(fl 2nd half of the 14th century). Italian composer. He was evidently a Bolognese saddler by trade. A three-voice ballata by him, Se questa dea de vertù, rather archaic in style, survives in F-Pn n.a.fr.6771 (f.33; ed. in PMFC, x, 1977, p.92), with text by Matteo Griffoni; and a contratenor survives fragmentarily in ...

Article

Borlet  

Gilbert Reaney

(fl ?c1397–1409). French or Spanish composer. The name may be an anagram of Trebol, and there was a composer of that name in the service of King Martin I of Aragon from 1408 to 1409, when he moved into the service of King Martin of Sicily. He may be identifiable with Johan Robert, a singer in the chapel of Charles III of Navarre between ...

Article

Robert Falck and John Haines

(b Autafort [now Hautefort], ?1150; d Dalon, nr Hautefort, before 1215). Troubadour. His birthplace was in the Périgord region of the former province of Limousin; he was lord of the family castle at Autafort. In about 1195 he entered the Cistercian monastery at Dalon, Ste Trie, and remained there until his death. He is probably best known for his praise of military and political exploits; in the eighth circle of Dante’s ...

Article

Bosquet  

Ursula Günther and Gilbert Reaney

(fl late 14th century; d before Nov 30, 1406). French composer. He is probably identifiable with Johannes de Bosco (Boscho, Bosquo) or Jean du Bois, a cleric and singer from Tournai who can be traced from about 1364 to 1406. In 1371, while rector of Ascq (near Lille), Johannes de Bosco received a canonicate at St Pierre, Lille. He served Cardinal Jean de Blauzac, Bishop of Nîmes (vicar-general in Avignon under Gregory XI), as ...

Article

Gilbert Reaney

(fl c1400). North Netherlandish composer. He was probably from Dordrecht, where the name occurred frequently at the time, though never as a monk’s, and he may be the priest Hugh who was appointed as a singer to the court of Holland at The Hague in ...

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Theodore Karp

(b c1210; d Arras, 1272). French trouvère. His grandfather, Jacques, was ‘sergent héréditaire’ of the abbey of St Vaast in Arras at the turn of the 13th century, one of eight officials supervising the water rights to the river Scarpe within the abbey's domain; his father (also named Jehan) held this position at least from ...

Article

Briquet  

David Fallows

(fl early 15th century). ?French composer. His little two-voice rondeau Ma seule amour et ma belle maistresse (ed. in CMM, xi/2, 1959) appears in three manuscripts, two of them ascribed. He could be the Jehan de Villeroye, called ‘Briquet’, who was a ...

Article

Lukas Richter

(fl c Constantinople, 1300). Byzantine scholar and music theorist. Although academically eccentric, Bryennius instructed the statesman Theodorus Metochites (c1260–1332) in mathematics, astronomy and, probably, also music (a didactic poem by Theodorus reflects his teaching). No works by Bryennius on mathematics and astronomy survive, but his doctrines on these subjects can be seen in a letter to the monk Maximus Planudes (...

Article

Margaret Bent

(d before Feb 5, 1423). English composer. He is known from a Gloria and a Credo in the second layer of the Old Hall Manuscript which are ascribed simply to ‘Burell’. A royal chaplain of this name appears in the wardrobe lists of 1413, 1415 (when he was on the sick-list at Harfleur) and 1421. He held canonries at Chichester, Hereford and York (where he was precentor for a mere ten days in 1410) and a corrody at Meaux Abbey from 1416. He is mentioned as deceased in a warrant, dated 5 February 1423, to present one John Hunt, also a clerk of the royal chapel, to his Meaux corrody. This reference to his death eliminates other candidates reported in Grove6 and elsewhere.

His Gloria and Credo (ed. in CMM, xlvi, 1969–73, nos.12 and 65) are both written in three-part score and neither is based on chant. Both alternate sections in contrasting mensurations, the Gloria ...

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Ernest H. Sanders

(fl late 13th century). English composer. He is probably to be identified with the R. de Burgate who was abbot of Reading from 1268 to 1290, and who apparently resigned because of his inability to cope with the abbey's financial difficulties. His name occurs in the first item of the list of compositions contained in a book, now lost, which was owned in the later 13th century by ...

Article

Margaret Bent

(fl c1410–1420). English composer. He was one of the stylistically more advanced contributors to the first layer of the Old Hall Manuscript. No certain identification has been made, though a possible candidate is Thomas Byteryng, a canon at Hastings Castle (1405–8...