81-100 of 1,702 results  for:

  • Early 18th c./Late Baroque (1700-1750) x
Clear all

Article

Christoph Wolff and Ulrich Leisinger

Member of Bach family

(b Leipzig, June 21, 1732; d Bückeburg, Jan 26, 1795). Composer, son of (7) Johann Sebastian Bach (24) and Anna Magdalena Bach. He is known as the ‘Bückeburg Bach’.

He received his musical education from his father. After leaving the Thomasschule, Leipzig, he is thought to have studied law briefly, but there is no record of his matriculation at Leipzig University. At the express wish of Count Wilhelm of Schaumburg-Lippe he was appointed harpsichordist to the court in Bückeburg, where he may at first have been subordinate to the court organist Ludolf Münchhausen. In June 1751 his brother Carl Philipp Emanuel visited him in the retinue of Frederick the Great when the king awarded the Order of the Great Eagle to Count Wilhelm. At this time the musical life of the court in Bückeburg was dominated by the Konzertmeister Angelo Colonna and the court composer Giovanni Battista Serini; they left Bückeburg in the middle of ...

Article

Christoph Wolff and Peter Wollny

Member of Bach family

(34) (b Eisenach, Jan 28, 1722; d Eisenach, Sept 1, 1777). Composer and organist, son of (5) Johann Bernhard Bach (18). On 16 January 1737 he entered the Thomasschule in Leipzig and became a pupil of his uncle (7) Johann Sebastian (24). After studying law at Leipzig University he returned to Eisenach in 1741 and deputized, without pay, for his ailing father. Plans to go to Frankfurt, Hamburg or Berlin, mentioned in a letter written by his cousin Johann Elias Bach (39), were never realized. In 1748 he became his father's official assistant and the next year his successor. He continued to practise as a lawyer as well, and in addition he was appointed Kapellmeister at the Weimar court in 1756 ‘in view of his well-known skill and musical knowledge’. This entailed regular journeys to Weimar, and during his frequent absences from Eisenach he was permitted to hire a substitute for his organist's duties. When the Hofkapelle was dissolved after the death of Duke Ernst August Constantin in ...

Article

Christoph Wolff

Member of Bach family

(b Thal, nr Eisenach, Feb 4, 1677; d Meiningen, bur. May 1, 1731). Composer, son of Johann Jacob Bach (3/60). Nothing is known of his musical training, but he probably received some early instruction from his father before attending the Gotha Gymnasium in 1688–93. From 1699 he was a court musician at Meiningen, from 1703 Kantor and from 1711 court Kapellmeister. In 1706 he had unsuccessfully applied to succeed A.C. Dedekind as Kantor of St Georg, Eisenach, although he had been interested only in the musical and not the teaching duties of the post. His patron of many years, Duke Ernst Ludwig, died in 1724 and Johann Ludwig wrote the music for his funeral.

Johann Ludwig wrote an imposing number of vocal works. Although orchestral music was probably his principal activity from 1711 onwards, hardly any music at that type is extant. The preservation of the cantatas is due primarily to Johann Sebastian, who performed 18 of them, as well as the two masses, in Leipzig in ...

Article

Christoph Wolff

Member of Bach family

(b Struth, nr Schmalkalden, Nov 9, 1745; d Elberfeld, 1820). Composer. He was descended from a Hessian line of Bachs that can be traced back to a Caspar Bach (d Struth, c1640) and already had many branches in the 17th century. It is probable, but cannot be proved, that this line was originally connected with the main Wechmar line of the Bach family. Johann Michael evidently went on his travels at an early date, and in about 1767 visited Holland, where he was in touch with the Amsterdam music publisher Hummel; he then went to England and America. On his return he studied law in 1779–80 at the University of Göttingen, where he met J.N. Forkel, and from 1781 at Leipzig University. He was practising as a lawyer in Güstrow, Mecklenburg, in 1790 but composed music at the same time, and in ...

Article

Christoph Wolff

Member of Bach family

(27) (b Eisenach, Oct 10, 1669; d Jena, Nov 4, 1753). Composer and organist, son of (2) Johann Christoph Bach (13). After his early musical training at home, he entered the University of Jena in 1690, pursuing his musical studies with J.N. Knüpfer (son of Sebastian Knüpfer, Thomaskantor in Leipzig). After a journey to Italy, the purpose and duration of which are not known, he succeeded Knüpfer in 1694 as organist of the town church in Jena. The university authorities were however reluctant to allow him to act in addition as organist at the Kollegienkirche, as Knüpfer had done, and it was not until 1719 that he finally took on the double post of town and university organist. In 1703 he had refused an appointment at St Georg, Eisenach, as successor to his father, primarily, no doubt, because of the better salary in Jena, where he lived in modest prosperity. Presumably he was in contact with his relative Johann Georg Bernhard (...

Article

Christoph Wolff and Walter Emery

Member of Bach family

(24) (b Eisenach, March 21, 1685; d Leipzig, July 28, 1750). Composer and organist. The most important member of the family, his genius combined outstanding performing musicianship with supreme creative powers in which forceful and original inventiveness, technical mastery and intellectual control are perfectly balanced. While it was in the former capacity, as a keyboard virtuoso, that in his lifetime he acquired an almost legendary fame, it is the latter virtues and accomplishments, as a composer, that by the end of the 18th century earned him a unique historical position. His musical language was distinctive and extraordinarily varied, drawing together and surmounting the techniques, the styles and the general achievements of his own and earlier generations and leading on to new perspectives which later ages have received and understood in a great variety of ways.

The first authentic posthumous account of his life, with a summary catalogue of his works, was put together by his son Carl Philipp Emanuel and his pupil J.F. Agricola soon after his death and certainly before ...

Article

Christoph Wolff and Peter Wollny

Member of Bach family

(45) (b Weimar, Nov 22, 1710; d Berlin, July 1, 1784). Composer and organist, eldest son of (7) Johann Sebastian (24) and Maria Barbara Bach. Trained by his father and endowed with brilliant gifts, he expressed himself in the genres of his time in a sensitive and highly cultivated musical language.

He was baptized on 24 November 1710; his godparents were the Weimar chamberlain Wilhelm Ferdinand von Lynker, Anna Dorothea Hagedorn and Friedemann Meckbach, the last two acquaintances of J.S. Bach from Mühlhausen. Friedemann attended the Lutheran Lateinschule in Cöthen (1717–23), and from 14 June 1723 he was a day-boy at the Thomasschule in Leipzig. On 5 March 1729 he matriculated at Leipzig University, where his father had already registered him as a depositus on 22 December 1723; he attended lectures on law, philosophy, mathematics and other subjects. His early musical education, provided by his father, is documented in the ...

Article

Jean-Charles Léon

(b 1703; d Angers, 1782). French composer. He received his musical education in the Angers choir school, which he left in 1723 to become an adult chorister. On 14 November 1724 he was a candidate for the post of maître de chapelle to succeed Louis Vigné, and it is likely that he was appointed to the post and occupied it until 1732, the year in which he left Angers. He is next heard of in Orléans and then in Verdun, where a Te Deum and motets by him were sung before the king. In 1747 he became maître de musique at Clermont-Ferrand, a position he left in 1760 to return to Angers, where he was again maître de chapelle until 1768 at the latest, after which he undertook various responsibilities within the chapter. On 8 May 1772 he donated 14 masses (no longer extant) to the chapter.

Three works, dated ...

Article

Peter Ross

[Hans Kaspar]

(b Zürich, Dec 26, 1695; d Zürich, June 23, 1755). Swiss composer and music pedagogue. The year of his birth has been given incorrectly in some sources as 1697. His father Joseph, originally a tailor and from 1692 a schoolteacher, planned a theological training for Johann Caspar, who was his second son. After study at the cathedral school, the Collegium Humanitatis, and (from 1715) the theology class, Bachofen gained the title V.D.M. (verbi divini minister) in 1720. In 1711 he joined the collegium musicum at the chapter house, and in 1715 he became a member of one that met at the German School. In 1720 he became a singing teacher at the lower grammar school. His small income compelled him to seek a secondary source of income, from trading in violin strings. Despite disputes with officials and colleagues, he was appointed, after J.K. Albertin’s death in ...

Article

Lawrence E. Bennett

(b probably Verona, 1672; d Vienna, Sept 23, 1738). Italian composer. His earliest known work is the oratorio La sete di Cristo in croce, a sepolcro written for Innsbruck in 1691. At the begining of 1692 he may have lived in Rome, where his earliest secular dramatic works were produced. By spring 1692 he was a court composer at Innsbruck. He gained the enthusiastic patronage of Eleonora Maria (1653–97), widow of both King Michael Wisniowiecki of Poland and Duke Charles of Lorraine, and stepsister of Emperor Leopold I. Besides the 1691 oratorio, Badia composed for Innsbruck two operas in 1692, as well as two sepolcri for Holy Week 1693. With the support of Eleonora Maria, who moved to Vienna late in 1693, and with a recommendation from the King of Poland, he was appointed Musik-Compositeur at the imperial court on 1 July 1694, receiving an initial monthly salary of 60 florins retroactive to ...

Article

Barbara Dobbs Mackenzie

[Carnace]

(fl 1729–62). Italian bass and impresario. He was one of the most popular comic opera singers of his day and a particularly important figure in the development and dissemination of the genre in the middle of the century. He performed in at least 100 productions beginning in the late 1720s, when he sang intermezzos in Foligno and Pesaro. He launched his comic opera career in Rome in 1738 with Gaetano Latilla’s La finta cameriera and Madama Ciana and Rinaldo di Capua’s La commedia in commedia. Productions throughout northern Italy of these operas along with another first performed in Rome, Rinaldo’s La libertà nociva (1740), dominated Baglioni’s career for the next decade. In 1749 he appeared in the dramma giocoso L’Arcadia in Brenta in Venice, the first collaboration between Galuppi and Goldoni, and for the remainder of his career he primarily sang texts written by Goldoni, in cities along the axis from Venice to Turin. His range encompassed ...

Article

(fl 1726–43). Italian contralto. She was a Florentine in the employment of the Grand Duchess of Tuscany, and married to the tenor G.B. Pinacci (1732). She sang in Florence (1725–6), Bologna (1726–8), Livorno (1727), Naples (1727, in operas by Vinci and Hasse) and Milan (1728, 1730). She may have been the Anna Bolognesi who appeared in Venice in 1729, and she sang in Turin in 1731 (Porpora’s Poro). Engaged by Handel for the London season of 1731–2, she made her début at the King’s Theatre as Alcestis in a revival of Admeto on 7 December. She sang in the original productions of Ezio and Sosarme, in revivals of Giulio Cesare, Flavio, the bilingual Acis and Galatea and Ariosti’s Coriolano, and in the pasticcio Lucio Papirio dittatore. The two parts Handel composed for her, Valentinian in Ezio...

Article

Hans Joachim Marx

(bc 1700; d after 1726). German bass . He was mentioned in the Hamburg Relations-Courier (4 Dec 1724) as ‘the new bass Mons. Bahn’, who was billed to sing Argante in Handel’s Rinaldo at the Gänsemarkt theatre. He had previously made his début as Mars on 2 November in Giovanni Porta’s ...

Article

Philip J. Kass

(b Füssen, Bavaria, May 10, 1712; d Naples, Feb 5, 1763). German violin maker. He moved to Naples early in his career. His violins closely resemble those of the Gagliano family, particularly Nicola, suggesting that he learnt his craft in that workshop. The relative scarcity of his work (only violins are known) is probably due to his short lifespan. His instruments are usually on the small side, in conformity with the Gaglianos’. His varnish is typically Neapolitan and ranges from deep red-orange to gold. He appears to have used the same printed label throughout his career, with his initials contained in a circle following the date. There is also at least one example branded on the button with the letters ‘G B N’ (his initials and city) enclosed in a shield....

Article

Marco Brusa and Herbert Seifert

(fl 1720–73). Italian composer. The earliest documentation of him is the score of the Oratorio della Madonna de' sette dolori; this bears a dedication to Emperor Charles VI, in whose service he already was at the time, signed ‘Ignatio Balbi Dilettante’ and dated ‘Milan, 24 February 1720’. In 1724–5 Balbi contributed four arias to two oratorios performed in Milan, and according to Quadrio he also contributed to one given there in 1726; this was possibly Il martirio di S Giovanni Nepomuceno, whose published libretto does not bear any composer's name. The librettos of three other works performed in Milan name Balbi as composer: La verità confessatasi da un'anima dannata (1729), La Passione (1735) and Ritornando il giorno trentesimo d'agosto l'anno MDCCLII (1752). In the libretto of the last of these he is described as ‘Virtuoso Dilettante Signor Don Ignazio Balbi Milanese, Segretario di S[ua] M[aestà] I[mperial] R[egia]’. The title ‘Regio Segretario Imperiale’ also appears in some of Balbi's letters, including one dated ...

Article

James L. Jackman

revised by Marco Bizzarini

(b ?Brescia, c1683; d after 1768). Italian composer. Early historians name Rome as his birthplace, but some contemporary documents describe him as being from Brescia, where Baldassari was quite a common name. From his works it can be assumed that he was in Brescia in 1709, and in librettos he is named maestro di cappella of the Oratorio di S Filippo Neri (Congregazione della Pace) in Brescia. He held this post from 1714 until at least 1768 and until 1754 he was also maestro di cappella of S Clemente, Brescia. In December 1717 he competed, unsuccessfully, for the same post at the basilica of S Maria Maggiore, Bergamo. He took holy orders.

Apart from the componimento per musica, Il giudizio di Paride, written to celebrate the name day of the Empress Amalia Wilhelmina, little of Baldassari's music has survived. From that which has survived, his musical language can be said to bear traces of the canonic writing practised by members of the Accademia Filarmonica of Bologna. A letter to Padre Martini dated ...

Article

Winton Dean

(fl 1714–35). Italian alto castrato. He came from Cortona and may have sung in three operas at Palermo in 1714–16. He appeared in 13 operas in Venice (1722–4, 1729 and 1733–5), including works by Gasparini, Orlandini, Giacomelli, Hasse and Leo, in Genoa (1723 and 1730), Milan (1723 and 1725), Florence and Turin (1730–31) and Rome (1731). He was engaged for three seasons (1725–8) by the Royal Academy in London, making his début in a revival of the Vinci-Orlandini Elpidia. He sang in ten operas by Handel (four of them revivals), the pasticcio Elisa, Ariosti’s Lucio Vero and Teuzzone and Giovanni Bononcini’s Astianatte. The six parts Handel composed for him, Scipio in Scipione, Taxiles in Alessandro, Trasimede in Admeto, Oronte in Riccardo Primo, Medarse in Siroe and Alessandro in Tolomeo, indicate a narrow compass (a to ...

Article

Michael Talbot

(b ?Venice, 1700 or 1701; d Venice, Feb 1, 1733). Italian singer . Having sung contralto roles in operas performed in the provinces from as early as 1720, she made her Venetian début in Vignati’s I rivali generosi at S Samuele in 1726. Her career was short; the last opera in which she is known to have appeared was Orlandini’s Adelaide (S Cassiano, Carnival 1729). A contract that she made with Vivaldi on 13 October 1726 shows her to have been a worthy seconda donna; for singing in only one opera (Vivaldi’s Farnace, given at S Angelo, Carnival 1726–7) she was to receive 200 ducats, payable in instalments before, during and after the performances. Her retirement may have been caused by her marriage to a Venetian spicer, Angelo Venzoli. She died from an injury sustained when a carnival booth in St Mark’s Square collapsed.

R. Giazotto: Antonio Vivaldi...

Article

(b ?Milan, c1680; d Milan, Feb 16, 1747). Italian composer. A Milan Cathedral document of 1714 discloses that he was 34 years old at the time and that he had served for an unspecified period as maestro di cappella of S Maria della Passione, Milan. His selection by the cathedral chapter followed a written examination on 7 April 1714 in which he competed against Francesco Scarlatti (Alessandro's brother), A.F. de Messi, a Milanese musician, and G.A. Costa, a Paduan priest active in Rome (whom the cathedral was pressed to appoint by the Austrian court); accepting the recommendations of seven judges (including A.M. Bononcini and G.A. Perti), the chapter appointed Baliani maestro di cappella on 13 December 1714.

Except for a single cantata (Solitudine amata) and an act of an opera (Ambletto, 1719), no secular music by Baliani has come to light. He wrote a considerable quantity of music for the Ambrosian liturgy during his 33 years at Milan Cathedral, now in the cathedral archive (...

Article

Charles Beare

(b ?Salisbury, July 14, 1727; d Salisbury, Feb 18, 1795). English violin maker and instrument dealer. He lived and worked in Salisbury and, with Forster, did much to raise the standard of English violin making in the second half of the 18th century. Banks possibly learnt his craft from a relative or in London, perhaps with Wamsley. His woodwork, using native sycamore for backs and sides and pine for tops, looks like that of Duke and Joseph Hill, but he had even more in common with William Forster (i), since both used a thick, dark red oil-varnish, previously unknown in England. Banks might have worked in London on his own for a time, but most of his instruments are labelled from Salisbury. Banks is, like Forster, particularly famous for the many cellos he made. His violas were of the small size fashionable at the time and are less appreciated now, but his violins, though rare, are very good instruments tonally and sometimes pass for Italian. Of the cellos, most are built on a reduced Amati pattern and are very similar to the work of the Forsters, both in appearance and tone. Occasionally, however, Banks made a cello with features of Stradivari, and these are excellent in every way. Bows were sometimes branded by him, though they were doubtless made for him, and he was careful to brand his instruments, sometimes in many places. Some of the later instruments were made for and branded by the London firm of Longman & Broderip, who also employed lesser makers....