81-100 of 218 results  for:

  • Collector or Curator x
Clear all

Article

(b Wilster, Holstein, Oct 15, 1761; d Copenhagen, Dec 30, 1825). Danish folklorist, teacher and composer of German birth. After studying in Kiel (1782–5), where he came to know C.F. Cramer, Grønland took up a post as an official of the German chancellery in Copenhagen. Though he remained a civil servant all his life, his musical activities covered a wide field: he was the teacher of C.E.F. Weyse and acted as correspondent for a number of German and Danish music periodicals. His most important work, however, was concerned with the preservation of Scandinavian folksongs. In about ...

Article

Sigurd Berg

(b Copenhagen, Sept 9, 1824; d Copenhagen, July 14, 1883). Danish folklorist. He was the son of the well-known poet and hymn writer Bishop N.F.S. Grundtvig. He was educated by his father and matriculated at the University of Copenhagen in 1846. As a boy he took a great interest in Danish medieval folk ballads, and at the age of 18 he published translations of related English and Scottish folksongs. In ...

Article

(b London, England, ?1883; d Chicago, IL, 12 or Dec 13, 1973). American pianist and music collector of English birth. Having immigrated to the United States with his parents when he was about four years of age, he spent the remainder of his life in Chicago as a ragtime and vaudeville pianist and an organist in churches and theaters. Around the turn of the century he began to amass one of the largest private music collections in the United States, laying particular emphasis on opera and on English and American song imprints. Few scholars were granted access to the collection during Harding’s lifetime, and on his death the entire collection was transferred to the Bodleian Library in Oxford, England. Harding’s American music holdings consisted largely of 60,000 to 70,000 items of sheet music, with particular strengths in the areas of ragtime, comic opera, minstrel-show music, war songs, and Chicago imprints....

Article

Franz Krautwurst

(b Ansbach, 1493; d Heilsbronn, Oct 15, 1554). German music collector and composer. He studied at the University of Leipzig from 1511, and in 1514 took the bachelor's degree. Even before he matriculated he seems to have known the university deacon Nikolas Apel, whose love of music may have stimulated Hartung's interest in collecting musical works. He was one of Luther's early adherents and from ...

Article

Jonathan P. Wainwright

(b Barking, Essex, June 28, 1605; d nr Corby, Northamptonshire, July 4, 1670). English music patron and collector. His family's principal residence was at Kirby Hall, near Corby. His father, also Sir Christopher Hatton (c1570–1619), was a patron of Orlando Gibbons; Gibbons's ...

Article

(b Bökendorf, nr Brakel, Westphalia, Feb 3, 1792; d Hanover, Dec 31, 1866). German folksong collector. He was educated as a geologist, mineralogist and lawyer, and, as a distinguished agricultural historian, made extensive journeys through Prussia and Russia. Stimulated by his generation’s interest in folksongs, and by his family's enthusiasm for the collections of fairy tales and sagas of the brothers Grimm, he abandoned a political career after the revolution of ...

Article

(b Augsburg, 1520; d Augsburg, July 28, 1583). German collector of music. He came from one of the oldest patrician families of Augsburg, where his father Georg was mayor. As a judge and a member of the higher and lower councils he was one of the most influential men in Augsburg public life. Through large-scale commercial and banking businesses, partly in collaboration with the house of Habsburg and with Anton Fugger, he and his brother Johann Paul amassed a considerable fortune. In ...

Article

Edward H. Tarr

(b St Michaelis, Saxony, April 27, 1940). German organologist. He played the cornett with the Capella Lipsiensis and studied musicology, indology and ethnology at the University of Leipzig with Besseler, H.C. Wolff, Eva Lips and Johannes Mehlig, 1959–64; thereafter he was on the staff of the Musikinstrumenten-Museum of the university until ...

Article

Paul F. Wells

(b Lake Forest, IL, Oct 20, 1935). American Folklorist and folksinger. He was exposed to folk songs by his parents when he was a child and began to play the guitar as a teenager. His interest in folk music deepened during his undergraduate years at Oberlin College (BA ...

Article

Alec Hyatt King

(b Frankfurt, Feb 24, 1881; d Cambridge, Nov 23, 1951). British collector of German origin. Hirsch’s name is perpetuated by the great music library which he began to assemble in 1896 and took to Cambridge when he left Germany 40 years later. He devoted all the energy and leisure that he could spare from his work as an industrialist to extending the range and depth of the collection. He added to it extensively in Cambridge, where the books were deposited in the University Library, and continued to enrich it with gifts even after he had sold it to the British Museum in ...

Article

Alec Hyatt King and Joost van Gemert

(b Rotterdam, March 23, 1887; d Zürich, Nov 1, 1983). Dutch collector and bibliographer. While training as an engineer in Delft, he also received his early education in music from Anton B.H. Verhey, and in 1911 attended the Hoch Conservatory at Frankfurt where he studied harmony with Bernhard Sekles and composition with Ivan Knorr. From ...

Article

Raoul F. Camus

(b New York, Jan 15, 1922; d Poughkeepsie, NY, Feb 16, 1983). American band enthusiast and philanthropist. After attending Pomona College, Claremont, California (BA 1943), he owned and managed an architectural woodworking firm in Poughkeepsie for over 20 years, and later a chain of bowling alleys. An amateur euphonium player, he amassed an encyclopedic collection of band scores, rivaling that of the US Marine band. In conjunction with Commander Donald Stauffer, director of the US Navy Band, he issued a series of 15 recordings made by the band entitled ...

Article

Gary Galván

(b Mineola, TX, July 10, 1882; d London, England, Aug 19, 1975). American art collector, preservationist, musician, and philanthropist. She was the only daughter of lawyer and Texas governor Colonel James Stephen Hogg. She was named after the heroine in the candid Civil War poem “The Fate of Marvin,” written by her uncle, Thomas Hogg [pseudo. Tom R. Burnett]. She never married and was known simply as Miss Ima for most of her life....

Article

Jamie C. Kassler

(d Glasgow, c1771). ?Scottish writer on the theory of music. From 1765 to 1770 he was associated with the University of Glasgow, for the chapel of which he compiled A Collection of Church-Music (Glasgow, 1766). In the same year he published by subscription the first part of a two-part treatise, the two parts together appearing as ...

Article

Josephine Wright

(b Notasulga, AL, Jan 7, 1891; d Fort Pierce, FL, Jan 28, 1960). American writer, playwright, anthropologist, and folklorist. Although Hurston is best known as a novelist and essayist, she was one of the first African-Americans to apply the anthropological method to the study and collection of black folklore in the United States and Caribbean. In ...

Article

Nicholas Temperley

(bap. Aldersgate, London, Feb 26, 1724; d London, April 15, 1764). English amateur musician. ‘In his younger days he was a great beau’, said Hawkins, who is the chief source of information about Immyns. ‘He had been guilty of some indiscretions, which proved an effectual bar to success in his profession, and reduced him to the necessity of becoming a clerk to an attorney in the city’. He cultivated music assiduously, playing the flute, viola da gamba and harpsichord, and had a ‘cracked counter-tenor voice’. As a member of the Academy of Ancient Music, and as a student and copyist to Pepusch, he became familiar with much old music, which he preferred to that of his own day. In ...

Article

Sarah Fuller

(b 1163; d Jan 27, 1225). French chronicler of St Martial of Limoges and monk. Received as a boy scholar at St Martial in 1177, Itier held a succession of important offices, culminating in appointments as librarian (1204) and precentor (by ...

Article

Jeff Todd Titon

(b White Plains, NY, Sept 4, 1925; d Bangor, ME, Aug 1, 2009). American folklorist, folksinger, and song collector. Ives was educated in English (MA, Columbia) and folklore (PhD, Indiana University), and taught for more than 40 years at the University of Maine. His travels in Maine and the Maritime Provinces of Canada brought him into contact with the traditions of local song-making and storytelling, particularly among men working in the woods in lumber camps and as guides. Ives’ reflexive studies of New England song-makers from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries show a keen intelligence and generosity of spirit. His eight books concentrated on deceased working-class songsters and storytellers (Larry Gorman, Lawrence Doyle, Wilbur Day, George Magoon, and Joe Scott), and on creativity within traditional forms. He claimed that vernacular literature and song had social and aesthetic values that transcended its sentimentality. His teaching and writing inspired two generations of New England folklorists, and he was active as an educator and public speaker throughout the state of Maine, where he is remembered with affection. He founded the Northeast Archives of Folklore, which later became incorporated into the Maine Folklife Center at the University of Maine, and which houses thousands of recorded interviews, photographs, and artifacts related to traditional music and lifeways in Maine and the Maritimes....

Article

Matt Meacham

(b Jacksonville, FL, June 21, 1942). American folklorist and fiddler. An orchestral violinist early in life, he studied folklore and medieval literature at Duke University, earning the PhD in English in 1968. He documented the playing of Appalachian traditional fiddlers and drew upon their repertoire as a member of the Hollow Rock String Band, which contributed significantly to the 1960s folk revival. After teaching at UCLA (...

Article

E. Bradley Strauchen-Scherer

(b New York, NY, 17 March 1922; d London, England, 12 Sept 1990). American ethnomusicologist and curator. Although born and reared in the Bronx, Jenkins portrayed herself as having been brought up in rural Arkansas surrounded by Ozark folk music. As a teenager, she learnt an extensive repertoire of folksongs and became active in American folk music circles. Like many folksingers of the era, Jenkins espoused socialism. She studied anthropology and musicology in Missouri but her support of trade unions and civil rights attracted the scrutiny of the FBI....