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Article

David Fuller and Bruce Gustafson

[Odo]

(b Sézanne, Feb 2, 1695; d Paris, Nov 7, 1756). French organist and harpsichordist, older brother of Charles Demars. He married Geneviève Françoise Legris on 18 February 1734 and they had seven children. In 1726 he obtained the post of organist of St Jacques-de-la-Boucherie in Paris, and later he became organist of St Nicolas-du-Chardonnet. Several ...

Article

Neal Zaslaw

(b ?Paris, late 17th century; d ?Paris, mid-18th century). French composer and violinist. About 1700 he joined the entourage of M. Angran, conseiller du roi et auditeur en sa chambre des comptes, who encouraged and financed his musical education as can be learnt from the dedication of Denis’ op.2. He may have been a descendant of the family of instrument makers of that name active in 17th-century Paris. Denis described his sonatas as ...

Article

Neal Zaslaw

[Pietro]

(b ?France, early 18th century; d ?Paris, after 1777). French mandolin player and composer. He was active in Paris in the 1760s and 70s; around 1774–5 he visited England. In 1776 and 1777 he was listed in Parisian directories as maître de mandoline, but after 1778 his name no longer appeared, suggesting that he had either moved elsewhere or died.

Denis is best known for his French translations of J.J. Fux’s Gradus ad Parnassum (Paris, 1773–5, 2/1780, 3/1788) and of Tartini’s Traité des agréments de la musique (Paris, 1771, 2/1775); the latter may have been carried out under the aegis of Tartini’s student La Houssaye, although in the preface Denis claimed friendship with Tartini and La Houssaye’s name does not appear in the volume. (For published dances which may be Pierre Denis’ work, see Denis, Jean-Baptiste.)

published in Paris in the 1760s unless otherwise stated...

Article

David Fuller

revised by Peter Holman

[François]

(b ?after 1667; d c1740). French harpsichordist, violinist and composer, active mainly in England. He was known as Charles to his contemporaries and to Hawkins, the main source for the events of his life, but an autograph letter in French is signed F. Dieupart (facs. in Six suittes, ed. P. Brunhold). A French notarial act published by Hardouin (1714) shows a François Dieupart, son of a Parisian candlemaker married in 1667, living in the parish of St James, Piccadilly, London. He was probably related to the French court wind player Nicolas Dieupart, the main copyist of an important manuscript of instrumental trios ( US-NH Filmer MS 33), whose name appears in the accounts of the Ecurie Royale between 1667 and his death in 1700.

Dieupart’s Six suittes (1701) are dedicated to the Countess of Sandwich, daughter of the Earl of Rochester, who went to France towards the turn of the century ‘for her health’. The wording of the dedication suggests that she became his pupil at some time before her return to England. Dieupart is first heard of in England in an advertisement for a concert at Drury Lane, London, on ...

Article

Mary Cyr

(fl 1735–55). French composer, viol player and teacher (‘maître de viole’). He worked in Paris. Throughout his Pièces de viole op.2, dedicated to the Prince of Carignan, Dollé used the signs for vibrato and ornaments adopted by Marin Marais, and the second of his three suites includes a tombeau for Marais le père, a rondeau whose chordal style, use of the high register and vibrato (called ‘plainte’) recall the expressive playing of the late master of the viol. The Pièces op.3 contains 25 character pieces for six-string pardessus de viole, which are divided into three levels of difficulty. The titles of two pieces, La Roland and La Morel, suggest his acquaintance with the viol players Roland Marais and Jacques Morel. The sonatas in op.4, though consciously italianate in melodic style, with frequent sequences, syncopations and wide leaps, still reflect the French taste in expression and ornamentation. Op.4 includes five ...

Article

James L. Jackman

revised by Francesca Seller

[Paolo, Giampaolo de, Giovan Paolo de]

(fl Naples, 1706–40). Italian composer and instrumentalist. He was probably a Neapolitan; the librettos of his three comic operas name him as ‘Virtuoso de Camera del’ … Dochessa de Laurenzano’, and he was paid 45 ducats for playing in the Teatro di S Carlo orchestra in the season 1739–40.

On 7 December 1711 his serenata Clizia, text by N. Giuro, was performed at the Palazzo Cafetani, Piedmont. His first opera was Lisa pontegliosa (text, A. Piscopo; Naples, Teatro dei Fiorentini, 11 November 1719) where, according to Scherillo, Neapolitan dialect was used for the first time in the pastoral variety of opera buffa; it would be more correct to say that here the customary Neapolitan domestic farce is given a pastoral setting, for in number of characters, plot and dramaturgy the work is far closer to the popular chelleta pe’ mmuseca than to the traditional pastoral comedy. Both Domenico’s other operas, ...

Article

Georg Feder

revised by Steven Zohn

[Dügren, Johann Jeremias]

(d Danzig [now Gdańsk], Jan 1756). ?French singer, keyboard player and composer, active in Germany. He was probably related to French immigrants whose names appear frequently in the city records of Danzig. A pupil of Telemann, Du Grain is first mentioned at Hamburg in 1730 as a soloist in cantatas by Telemann performed to commemorate the Augsburg Confession. From 1732 he lived in Elbing (now Elbląg, Poland) where he was a singer, organist and harpsichord player. In 1737 he was enjoined (‘injungieret’), presumably as an assistant, to the organist of the Marienkirche Daniel Dibbe; his name appears in the church accounts from 1737 to 1739. Among his compositions for Elbing were a St Matthew Passion (1737), performed annually until the 19th century, and the lost cantata Hermann von Balcke, written to celebrate the 500th anniversary of the city; the latter contained recitatives and some arias by Du Grain and arias from operas by Handel who helped to compile the work, but who left Elbing before the performance....

Article

Brian Boydell

(b London, 1703; d London, July 3, 1767). English violinist, composer and musical director. He was the natural son of Isaacs, a dancing-master. As a pupil of Geminiani, he soon made a name as a remarkably gifted boy violinist, first appearing at one of Thomas Britton’s concerts, where, standing on a high stool, he played a solo by Corelli with great success. On 27 May 1714 he had a benefit concert at Hickford’s Room. In 1724 he visited Dublin, and on 17 June 1727 married Frances Gates at Stanmore, Middlesex.

In 1728 he was appointed to succeed J.S. Kusser as Master and Composer of State Music in Ireland, a post said to have been intended for Geminiani but transferred to Dubourg for religious reasons. From then until 1752, when he succeeded Festing as leader of the King’s Band in London, he spent most of his time in Dublin, where he was an active influence in the musical community, though occasionally travelling to London (he took part, for instance, in performances of Handel’s ...

Article

Albert Cohen

(b Paris, c1710; d Paris, 1775). French maître de clavecin. He was a student of Jacques de Bournonville and a friend of the theorist P.-J. Roussier. He is known principally for two publications: Dictionnaire lyrique portatif, ou Choix des plus jolies ariettes (Paris, 1764, 2/1766–71 with suppl.), a large collection of then current French and Italian airs, all presented with French text in one part with an occasional duo, intended primarily for use by musical amateurs and as a teaching aid; and Manuel harmonique, ou Tableau des accords pratiques (Paris, 1767), a simplified, practical handbook for learning the principles of harmony primarily at the keyboard, based upon the teachings of Rameau. Although he is known to have composed music (his choral motet Exaltabo te was performed at the Concert Spirituel in Paris in 1741), only two menuets en rondeau appended to his Manuel appear to have survived. The ...

Article

Neal Zaslaw

[Pierre-Guillaume]

(b Paris, June 22, 1718; d Paris, after 1777). French violinist, son of Pierre Dupont. He is not to be confused with Guillaume Dupont, one of the 24 Violons du Roi in the 1720s and 30s. Dupont studied with Jean-Marie Leclair l’aîné, and in 1738 a report in Mercure de France listed him among young violin pupils ‘who promise much and who cause astonishment to many people’. He made his début at the Concert Spirituel in Paris in September and November 1739, playing three concertos by Leclair; between 1739 and 1755 he appeared as soloist at those concerts on 13 occasions. About 1745 he joined the orchestras of the Académie Royale de Musique and the Concert Spirituel, in both of which he played until pensioned in 1773. De Jeze’s Etat de Paris of 1759 listed Dupont as ‘maître de violon’. For Leclair’s memorial service, proposed for December 1765...

Article

(fl c1706–49). French cellist, harpsichordist, and composer. Nothing is known about his early life or musical education. He acquired his position at the French court on 16 August 1706, upon the death of his father, also named Nicolas. The younger Nicolas Duport is mentioned on several occasions as early as 1738 in the memoirs of the Duke of Luynes. He served as huissier de la chambre du roi, and in 1748, according to Luynes, was rewarded for his services with a snuff box bearing a portrait of the king. Luynes also referred to him as a ‘grand musicien’ who played ‘fort bien’. His grand motet Qui confidunt in Domino (for 5 voices and orchestra), was performed at Versailles on 1 February 1730. He also collaborated with a certain Dugué in the composition of Jupiter et Europe, a divertissement nouveau set to words by Louis Fuzelier, performed at court on ...

Article

James R. Anthony

(b 1718; d Paris, after 1775). French composer, dancer, ?singer and harpsichordist. In his contemporary manuscript, Notices sur les oeuvres de théâtre, the Marquis d'Argenson commented that Duval, ‘une jeune fille de l'Opéra’, was 18 in 1736 when she composed Les Génies, ou Les caractères de l'Amour. Fétis gave 1769 as her death date; Choron identified her as a ‘singer at the Paris Opéra’ and claimed that she was ‘still living in 1770’; the Anecdotes dramatiques for 1775 referred to her as a ‘former actress at the Opéra’ and included a ‘Mlle Duval’ as a supernumerary among the dancers.

Duval was best known as the composer of Les Génies, ou Les caractères de l'Amour (libretto by Fleury [de Lyon]), a ballet-héröique in a prologue and four entrées (printed in Paris about 1736). The dedication page reveals that the Prince of Carignan was her ‘Protecteur’. Les Génies...

Article

Neal Zaslaw

(b Paris, 1672/3; d Versailles, Jan 27, 1728). French violinist and composer. He was the son of a Parisian dancing-master of the same name. It is probably the senior Duval who was listed in the highest rank of the ‘Communauté des maîtres á dancer et jouers d’instruments de la ville et faubourgs de Paris’ in 1695 and who danced at the Paris Opéra in 1711 in a revival of Lully’s Cadmus. François senior had died by 13 November 1713. It is not known how or whether this branch of the family was related to the other Duvals (nearly a dozen) who practised music in Paris in the 17th and 18th centuries.

An air nouveau, published in Le mercure galant in December 1699, is probably the first evidence known of the younger Duval’s existence. By 1704 he was in the service of the Duke of Orléans, an enthusiastic musical amateur to whom he dedicated his first opus. This was a set of violin sonatas, the first to be published in France; they show a knowledge of the style and technique of Corelli, subtly mixed with the style of the French harpsichord ...

Article

(b Rouen, c1710; d Paris, 1762). French violinist and composer. The January 1744 issue of the Mercure de France announced the publication of six violin sonatas, mentioning that Exaudet was then first violinist of the Académie Royale de Musique de Rouen. He is also listed in the Paris Opéra archives as a violinist at the Foire St Laurent and the Foire St Germain that year. Through the generosity of his patron, the Marquis de la Vaupalière, Exaudet was able to maintain a second residence in Paris; in gratitude, Exaudet dedicated to him his op.2 (for which he was granted a privilège général on 20 December 1751). His name is among the Opéra orchestra in 1749 and the Concert Spirituel orchestra in 1751, and he remained a violinist in both until his death. In 1758 he became an ordinaire de la musique de la chambre du roi...

Article

Aníbal E. Cetrangolo

[Jaime, Jayme, Jacometto]

(b Marsango, nr Padua, 1676; d Madrid, Nov 16, 1753). Italian composer, violinist and cellist. The earliest information about him relates to his post in the service of the Marquis de los Balbases, Carlo Filippo Spinola. Cantatas by Facco now in the Naples Conservatory were probably composed when Spinola was governor of Castelnuovo, Naples, before 1707. From 1707 to 1713 Spinola served as viceroy in Sicily, where Facco had arrived by 1705, when he composed the dialogo Il convito fatto da Giuseppe. In Messina Facco dedicated to Spinola the serenata Augurio di vittorie, the dialogo La contesa tra la pietà e l’incredulità (both 1710) and three operas, Le regine di Macedonia (1710), I rivali generosi (1712) and Penelope la casta (1713), the last in collaboration with Pietro Pizzolo. Facco also dedicated to the marquis 12 concertos published in Amsterdam under the title ...

Article

Hans Radke

revised by Tim Crawford

(b Grossdalzig, nr Leipzig, April 26, 1697; d Bayreuth, Oct 6, 1754). German lutenist. He was the son of Johann Christian Falckenhagen, a schoolmaster. When he was ten he went to live for eight years with his uncle Johann Gottlob Erlmann, a pastor in Knauthain near Leipzig. There he underwent training ‘in literis et musicis’, particularly the harpsichord and, later, the lute. He then perfected his lute playing with Johann Jacob Graf in Merseburg, where in 1715 he is mentioned as a footman and musician in the service of the young Count Carl Heinrich von Dieskau. In the winter term of 1719 he entered Leipzig University; a year later he went to Weissenfels, where he remained for seven years as a lute teacher. From about 1724 he was also employed as a chamber musician and lutenist at the court of Duke Christian, where his presence is documented for ...

Article

John Walter Hill

(b ?Florence, before 1723; d ?Florence, after 1757). Italian violinist and composer. Fanfani dedicated a set of sonatas to Prince Giovanni Gastone de' Medici some time between 1713 and 1723 (see M. Cole: ‘A Sonata Offering for the Prince of Tuscany’, CMc, xvi, 1973, pp.71–8). In 1726 J.J. Quantz heard him perform in Florence with members of the grand-ducal chapel. Fanfani officially succeeded Martino Bitti as principal court violinist there in ...

Article

Michelle Fillion

(b ?Lyons, ?c1670; d after 1737). French violinist and composer. His father, Durand Favre, was a violinist from Lyons who, with Antoine, was hired as a member of the newly founded Lyons Opéra in 1687. According to the Supplément aux lyonnais dignes de mémoire (1757), an unreliable document apparently consulted by Fétis, Antoine Favre followed the singer Françoise Journet when she left Lyons to join the Paris Opéra about 1705. There seems to be no evidence supporting Fétis's claim that Favre joined the Paris Opéra orchestra at this date; nor can references to an unidentified ‘Faure’ active as a violinist in Paris in the last two decades of the 17th century be linked conclusively with either Antoine or his father. In 1713 Favre is first mentioned as a member of the petit choeur of the Opéra orchestra. In 1731 he was granted a six-year privilege which preceded the publication of his two sets of violin sonatas. Only the second of these, a group of six modest sonatas consisting of contrasting dance movements, is extant. In ...

Article

Gerald Gifford

(b Drayton, Shropshire, 1715; d Hereford, Dec 6, 1769). English clergyman, organist, harpsichordist and composer. He was the son of George Felton, a clerk, and was educated at Manchester Grammar School and St John's College, Cambridge (BA, 1738; MA, 1743). He married Anna, daughter of the Rev. Egerton Leigh, by whom he had a daughter. Felton was ordained priest by the Bishop of Hereford on 11 August 1742, became a vicar-choral and sub-chanter of the cathedral on 3 February 1743, and minor canon in 1760. In 1769 he was made chaplain to the Princess Augusta, widow of the Prince of Wales, and in the same year he was appointed custos of the College of Vicars Choral at Hereford. From 1744 he held various parochial appointments in Herefordshire. He was buried in the Lady Chapel at Hereford Cathedral: the inscription on his gravestone states that he died at the age of 54 and was ‘multiplici doctrina eruditus, rerum musicarum peritissimus’....

Article

Elizabeth M. Lamb and Melanie Groundsell

(b London, Nov 29, 1705; d London, July 24, 1752). English composer and violinist. He was a son of John and Elizabeth Festing, and it is possible that the family had some connection with Gros Festin, near Stralsund in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. John Festing, one of his brothers, played the flute and the oboe, and left a sizable fortune, which he obtained mainly by teaching. He is believed to be the musician portrayed in Hogarth's painting The Enraged Musician (1741, now in the Tate Gallery, London).

Michael Christian Festing was primarily a violin virtuoso. He was taught the violin first by Richard Jones and then by Francesco Geminiani. Festing in his turn gave violin lessons, Thomas Arne being one of his pupils. It is likely that the manuscript discovered in 1993, containing three of Festing's op.4 violin solos ( GB-Lbl ), belonged to one of his pupils. His first public appearance was on ...