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Article

Donald W. Krummel

[Berg, Joachim; Montanus]

(b Lübeck, c1540; d Dresden, 1597). German printer. After apprenticeship with Jakob Lucius in Rostock and Johann Eichorn in Frankfurt an der Oder, he moved to Dresden, working at first with Matthäus Stökel. His music printing began in 1570 with vocal collections by Matthaeus Le Maistre and Antonio Scandello, followed by several Lutheran hymnals. After his death the press was continued by his widow and heirs, including his son Gimel II (fl 1610–37, made Hofbruckdrucker in 1616), then Gimel III (fl 1640–43), Christian and Melchior (fl 1643–88), Melchior’s son Immanuel (fl 1688–93) and eventually Melchior’s son-in-law, Johannes Riedel (fl 1688–1716). Their most ambitious and best-executed printing coincides with their finest music. Editions of Heinrich Schütz began to appear in 1618, including the Psalmen Davids (1619) and the second and third parts of the Symphoniae sacrae...

Article

J.M. Thomson

(Georg)

(b Altona-Ottmarschen, Sept 24, 1902; d London, Jan 13, 1988). British editor and harpsichordist of German birth. He studied the piano and the flute at the Leipzig Conservatory, but turned from a musical career to the study of law, which he pursued at Halle and Freiburg. He qualified in 1930 and set up his own practice in 1933, often acting on behalf of Jews. In 1938 he was arrested by the Gestapo and imprisoned for three months; shortly after his release he emigrated to London. After internment on the Isle of Man Bergmann worked at Schott as a packer, eventually becoming their most distinguished editor. He brought much hitherto unknown Baroque music into the repertory, especially that of Telemann, for whom he had a special affinity. His many editions include recorder sonatas by Handel, Francesco Barsanti, Francis Dieupart and (with Frans Brüggen) J.C. Schickhardt, and music by Blow and Purcell. Associated with Tippett at Morley College in London in the 1940s, he later taught at the Mary Ward Settlement which stimulated his flair for working with children and amateurs. He also appeared frequently at Alfred Deller's Stour Festival. As harpsichordist he performed with Ilse Wolf, April Cantelo and many other artists, and accompanied Deller in several recordings of Purcell's music. Endowed with a rare generosity of spirit, he encouraged recorder players, such as Brüggen and Michala Petri, and young scholars, notably David Lasocki. He also composed two sonatas for recorder....

Article

Geoffrey Norris

(b Mitau [now Jelgava, Latvia], 1794; d St Petersburg, 28 April/May 9, 1871). Russian music publisher, pianist and composer. In 1808 his family moved to Vilnius, where Bernard learnt to play the piano and decided on a musical career in preference to his father's military profession. Two years later he moved to Moscow, where he became involved in the leading musical circles, taking piano lessons from John Field and studying composition with Johann Hässler. Subsequently he decided to abandon his considerably successful performing career, and in 1816 was appointed to take charge of the serf orchestra on Count Potocki's estate. In 1822 he settled in St Petersburg and earned a reputation as a fine piano teacher.

As a composer, Bernard is known primarily for his songs and for an opera, Ol′ga, doch′ izgnannika (‘Olga, the Exile's Daughter’), which enjoyed some success when it was first produced in St Petersburg during the ...

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Zdeněk Culka

(b Campagna, Oct 24, 1784; d Prague, May 18, 1853). Italian music publisher. He worked first for Artaria in Vienna. From 1811 to 1853 he owned his own publishing works and adjacent shop in Prague, where, in addition to music, maps and engravings, he sold instruments, strings, lithographs and oil paintings. From 1835 he also ran a large music-hire business, and maintained profitable commercial contacts with Italy, France, England, Germany and Russia. He issued about 1380 numbered items, of which some of the first 100 contain two separate compositions; nos.1330 to 1380 were published jointly with his son-in-law, Jan Hoffmann. Berra's main publications were songs and pieces for guitar or piano; besides some church music and works for flute and organ, he also published works by Bach, Beethoven, Weber and other widely known composers as well as many local ones (e.g. Tomášek, Vitásek, Kníže, Mašek, Jan Martinovský and Führer). He produced much contemporary dance music in the collections ...

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(b Palermo, Jan 20, 1759; d Palermo, March 15, 1852). Italian musician and lexicographer, son of Salvatore Bertini. He was educated at the Scuole Pie degli Scolopi and became a priest, devoting himself to music and to studies in archaeology and the literary and cultural history of Sicily. In 1789 he and his brother Natale Bertini (c1750–1828) contributed music to the memorial services held in Palermo for Carlo III and the Infante Gennaro Carlo. At that time he was deputy maestro di cappella under his father in the Cappella Palatina and he later became maestro di cappella there. In May 1828 he replaced his brother Natale as president of a commissione di censura for sacred music, constituted by royal decree in December 1827 to eliminate theatrical elements from church music and to draw up a list of approved works. Bertini held this post for about two years, after which the commission apparently dissolved without having accomplished anything....

Article

Geoffrey Norris

revised by Carolyn Dunlop

(b St Petersburg, 13/April 25, 1843; d Zürich, 16 Feb/March 1, 1907). Russian music publisher. He received his music education at the St Petersburg Conservatory, where he studied the violin with Wieniawski and music theory with Nikolay Zaremba, and graduated in 1865 from I.A. Veykman’s viola class. From 1866 to 1874 he played the viola in the ballet orchestra of the imperial theatres. In August 1869 he and his brother Ivan opened a music shop on the Nevskiy Prospekt and this swiftly expanded into a thriving publishing house. An important centre of Russian musical life, Bessel’s firm published works by all the prominent Russian composers, notably Tchaikovsky, Dargomïzhsky, Anton Rubinstein and the members of The Five. Bessel was known also as a writer, and several of his articles appeared in the weekly journal Muzïkal′nïy listok (‘The musical leaflet’), which he edited and published from September 1872 to May 1877...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by H.G. Farmer, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?London, ?1706; d London, bur. June 23, 1771). English engraver, publisher and bookseller. He worked in Covent Garden, London, having learnt the trade from his father George Bickham (b ?1684; d London, 4 May 1758), an engraver best known for The Universal Penman (1733–41). He was principally famous in music circles for his two illustrated folio volumes The Musical Entertainer, first issued in fortnightly parts, each containing four plates, from January 1737 to December 1739. The 200 plates are songs, headed and surrounded with pictorial embellishments illustrative of the song (see illustration), and engraved in the style of and even copied directly from Gravelot and Watteau. This work was the first of its kind to be published in England and quickly produced imitators such as Lampe’s British Melody, engraved by Benjamin Cole.

A second edition, corrected by Lampe, was also issued in parts (...

Article

Jamie C. Kassler

(b Halifax, c1744; d Grantham, May 6, 1796). English bookseller and dictionary compiler. He was the eldest son of Nathaniel Binns, printer and bookseller in Halifax, under whom he studied the book business. Early in life he went to London as an apprentice of, or employee in, the firm of Crowder. By 1770 he had established his own firm in Leeds, where he was also a partner in the commercial bank of Scott, Binns, Nicholson & Smith, and an amateur performer on the violin and cello. He published a Dictionarium musica (sic) (London, 1770, 2/1790, 3/1791) which appeared under different titles and was issued under the pseudonym John Hoyle. The work is derived chiefly from the dictionary published by James Grassineau in 1740.

J. Nichols: Literary Anecdotes of the Eighteenth Century (London, 1812–15/R) J.C. Kassler: The Science of Music in Britain, 1714–1830...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(b London, c1750; d London, Dec 19, 1819). English music seller, instrument dealer and publisher. From his early imprints it appears that he had been apprenticed to Walsh’s successors, William Randall and his wife Elizabeth. In 1783 he was in business with T. Beardmore as Beardmore & Birchall (or Birchall & Beardmore). From 1783 to May 1789 he was in partnership with Hugh Andrews as Birchall & Andrews; he also issued publications under the name Birchall & Co., and established a circulating music library. He then continued alone in the firm until 1819, though John Bland appears to have had some association with Birchall after he sold his own firm in 1795, until about 1801.

Birchall managed the series of Ancient Concerts and most of the benefit concerts of the time. In 1783 he proposed a complete reissue of Handel’s works in 80 folio volumes, but the project never materialized, though Birchall subsequently published many Handel items. In addition to glees, country dance books and much Italian vocal music, his publications included the first English edition of J.S. Bach’s ...

Article

William R. Lee

(b Cambridge Springs, PA, July 13, 1866; d Carlisle, MA, Feb 27, 1946). American music publisher and music educator. Son of a Pennsylvania physician, Birchard taught music in public schools and managed summer schools for music songbook publishers in the 1890s. In 1901 he became founder and president of C.C. Birchard and Co., specializing in the publication of school music and the works of American composers. His school series, The Laurel Song Book (1901), was highly successful and set new standards in music selection and graphics. He promoted American composers, including Ives, Still, Hanson, and Copland, and encouraged Arthur Farwell to organize the Wa-Wan Press (1901) to stimulate American composition. He was one of the founders (at Keokuk, Iowa, 1907) of the Music Supervisors National Conference (MSNC). He took advantage of the community singing movement, the patriotic fervor of World War I, and the Americanization drive of the 1910s and published several collections of which the ...

Article

Christopher Fifield

(b Berlin, Feb 17, 1852; d Niederschönenhausen, nr Berlin, June 12, 1889). German pianist, teacher and editor. He was a piano pupil of Theodor Kullak and Richard Wüerst in Berlin, and studied philosophy and modern languages at Berlin University (1868–72), taking the doctorate at Göttingen in 1873 with a dissertation on Bernart de Ventadorn. He taught the piano and (from 1879) theory at Kullak’s Neue Akademie der Tonkunst (1873–8), and later at the Stern Conservatory, where he remained until his death. He also had an active career as a concert pianist, playing mainly chamber music; with the violinist W. Helmich he organized the Monday Concerts at the Berlin Sing-Akademie. He was a leading figure among 19th-century German critical editors. His editions of piano music were exemplary for their time and encompass keyboard works of Bach, Handel, Mozart, Clementi, Weber, Schubert and Schumann, including the first variorum edition of Bach's ...

Article

Frank Dobbins

(fl Paris, 1561–8). French composer and editor. He worked as a corrector and transcriber for the press of Nicolas Du Chemin between 1561 and 1568 and was commissioned to prepare a series of selections from existing anthologies: four volumes duly appeared in 1561 and 1567. Among others he drew on pieces in the two Trophée de musique collections printed at Lyons in 1559. According to Du Verdier, in 1567 he adapted for two voices a collection of four-voice chansons, retaining the original melodies intact except for the insertion of an occasional rest, and edited a set of 30 similar duet reductions of pieces by E. (? recte A.) Gardano and Antoine de Villers. Neither has survived, but the latter must surely have been modelled on a collection already published by Le Roy & Ballard (RISM 1555²4). The only original piece by Bisson which has survived is the lively, imitative four-voice chanson, ...

Article

John H. Baron

(b Bennington, VT, 1826; d New Orleans, Oct 28, 1888). American music publisher. He worked as a music teacher in Huntsville, Alabama (1845–52), and Jackson, Louisiana (1852–5). In 1858 he joined E.D. Patton’s music shop in Vicksburg, Mississippi, which he bought out the following year with his younger brother Henry (1831–1909). They moved to New Orleans in 1860, where they operated publishing firms and music shops jointly, separately and often with others. From 1861 to 1866 Henry also ran a shop in Augusta, Georgia. Armand was imprisoned briefly in 1862 by the Union Army for his espousal of the Southern cause; he issued more Confederate music than any other publisher in New Orleans, including one of the earliest editions of Dixie (1861), and The Bonnie Blue Flag (1861) and Maryland! My Maryland! (1862). He frequently arranged or composed music under the pseudonym A. Noir. Blackmar was in San Francisco between ...

Article

Thomas W. Bridges

(b Asola, nr Mantua, 1490; d Rome, 1567). Italian printer. From 1516 until his death Blado printed more than 1200 editions in Rome as well as a few elsewhere. For the popular market he printed guidebooks, prognostications, devotional books and the like, and under clerical or aristocratic sponsorship classical and modern literature, books in Greek and Hebrew, theological works and much else. His books use a variety of ornaments, decorated initials and typefaces, including the Ethiopic type of his Modus baptizandi (1549); some are lavishly illustrated. In 1535 he obtained the exclusive right to print Vatican documents and thereafter styled himself ‘impressor camerale’ or ‘stampatore apostolico’. Blado was a dominant figure in Roman printing, and in 1550 his was one of the largest printing shops, with six or seven printers. His printer’s mark was a crowned eagle facing left, with wings unfolded, holding a standard in its talons....

Article

Donald W. Krummel

(b England, 1775; d Philadelphia, Feb 20, 1871). American music engraver and publisher. He emigrated to the USA before 1793 and in 1794 began teaching the flute and clarinet. In 1802 he acquired the piano manufactory of John I. Hawkins in Philadelphia, and soon after began to publish and to operate a circulating music library. His production included many American compositions (c1808) and political songs (c1813); an early piracy of Thomas Moore’s Irish Melodies (1808–c1825); a serial, Musical Miscellany (from 1815); and the first American edition of Messiah (c1830), along with other major vocal works by Handel. Most numerous among his output, however, were songs of the Philadelphia theatre, based on London publications. Blake also issued typeset opera librettos and engraved tunebooks. He remained active throughout the 1830s, in later years issuing minstrel music and excerpts from Italian opera. At the height of his career (...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(b ?London, c1750; d ?London, c1840). English music seller, instrument dealer and publisher. By 1776 he was established in London, where he remained active until his comparatively early retirement in 1795. In 1789 he went to Vienna to induce Haydn to visit England and to seek compositions from him and other composers, including Hoffmeister and Kozeluch. Bland is said to have been the hero of the ‘Razor’ Quartet story, in which he supposedly received the manuscript of the quartet, op.55 no.2, as a reward for presenting the composer with his English-style razor; however, the op.55 quartets were published in England not by Bland, but by Longman & Broderip in 1790. Haydn did eventually send Bland three piano trios (hXV: 15–17) which he subsequently published, and when Haydn arrived in London in January 1791 he spent his first night as a guest of Bland at his house in Holborn. Bland published other works by Haydn, though his business relationship with him was by no means an exclusive one. He also appears to have commissioned the ...

Article

Vilena Vrbanić

(b Zagreb, May 13, 1956). Croatian-American musicologist and editor. He studied musicology at the Zagreb Music Academy (BA 1980; MA 1983) and received the PhD at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (1997) with a dissertation on music in medieval and renaissance astrological imagery. He was a researcher at the institutes of musicology of the Zagreb Music Academy (1980) and the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts (1981; 1983–8) and also editor at the Croatian Music Information Center (1982–3).

He is affiliated with the Répertoire International de Littérature Musicale (RILM; in various functions since 1987; executive editor since 1996), and with the Research Center for Music Iconography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (associate director 1991–7; director since 1998). In 1998 he founded the journal Music in Art...

Article

Jack Westrup

revised by Rosemary Williamson

(Walter)

(b Berne, Aug 20, 1888; d London, April 11, 1959). English music critic, writer and editor. He was of Danish and British extraction on his father's side and Swiss on his mother's, and he was educated privately. As a young man, he was employed by the music publishing firm of J. & W. Chester in London. His career as a writer began in 1919, when he was invited by Rosa Newmarch to assist her in providing progamme notes for the Queen's Hall Promenade Concerts. He continued to do this until 1926. From 1923 to 1931 he was London music critic of the Manchester Guardian. In 1931 he was appointed music critic of the Birmingham Post. He returned to London in 1946 to begin work as editor of the fifth edition of Grove's Dictionary. Three years later he became music critic of The Observer. In the meantime he had succeeded A.H. Fox Strangways as editor of ...

Article

Maristella Feustle

(b Pekin, Tazewell County, IL, ?March 9, 1870; d Washington, DC, March 7, 1949). American publisher, real estate developer, and politician. Born into poverty, he began working as a child in a San Francisco vacuum cleaner brush factory, and soon began picking up odd jobs at local theaters. By 15, he was assistant treasurer at the Alcazar Theater, and he had become wealthy by 18. After traveling abroad, he settled in Chicago, and was in charge of the Midway Plaisance during the 1893 World’s Fair. He claimed to have composed the well-known “snake charmer’s” tune, or “Hoochie Coochie Dance” while there. Following the Fair, Bloom’s past connections in San Francisco brought him into association with the Witmark family and his first experience in music publishing. By 1895, Rothschild’s department store turned their sheet music department over to him. The next year he started his own company, publishing the hit “The Heroes Who Sank with the Maine” (...

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