81-100 of 127 results  for:

  • Publisher or Editor x
  • Music Manager or Administrator x
Clear all

Article

Brian Boydell

( b ?Dublin; d Dublin, 1763). Irish music publisher, music seller, instrument dealer and violinist . He worked from about 1738 in the business established by his brother Bartholemew (d July 1758) about a year previously at Corelli’s Head, opposite Anglesea Street in College Green, Dublin. In April 1740 he advertised a proposal for printing Geminiani’s Guida armonica by subscription; it was finally issued in about 1752. Notable publications by him include collections of songs from Arne’s Comus, Dubourg’s variations on the Irish melody ‘Ellen a Roon’ and in December 1752 ‘six Trios for 2 Fiddles and thorough Bass composed by Sieur Van Maldere’. From 1741 a number of publications were issued in conjunction with William Neale, including the Monthly Musical Masque consisting of a collection of contemporary popular songs; the first issue was advertised in January 1744. Manwaring also imported Peter Wamsley’s best violins, Roman fiddle strings and ‘all the newest music published in London’. In addition to his business he took a prominent part in Dublin musical life during the 1740s as a violinist, often appearing with his brother who was also a violinist. He acted as treasurer of various charitable musical societies. After his death his wife carried on the business until ...

Article

Paula Morgan

(b Vienna, July 13, 1902; d New York, Jan 7, 1987). American writer on music, of Austrian birth. He studied at the University of Vienna from 1918 to 1920, when he emigrated to the USA. Beginning his career as an advertising executive, he was later a vice-president and general manager for the record division of RCA Victor (1950–65), and he was music editor of Good Housekeeping (1941–57). He was particularly interested in popularizing music: he was responsible for the series of recordings Classical Music for People who Hate Classical Music, and wrote a number of popular biographies of composers and books on opera.

How to Listen to Music over the Radio (New York, 1937) Bach on Records (New York, 1942) Beethoven on Records (New York, 1942) A Front Seat at the Opera (New York, 1948/R) The Good Housekeeping Guide to Musical Enjoyment...

Article

Thomas W. Bridges

revised by Tim Carter

[Georges Marescot, Mareschot ]

(d Florence, April 1602). French bookseller and printer, active in Italy. Resident in Florence from the mid-1550s, on 7 April 1558 he matriculated in the Arte dei medici e speziali and became associated with Lorenzo Torrentino, the ‘stampatore ducale’. By 1563 he was commissioning the Torrentino firm to print books on his behalf, and some time later he acquired the firm’s equipment and stock. His production contains nothing of musical interest until Francesco Bocchi’s Discorso sopra la musica (1580–81). Soon after, he completed Vincenzo Galilei’s epochal Dialogo della musica antica et della moderna (1581/R), and in 1582 he published an anthology of three-part madrigals (RISM 15828), in 1584 a volume of two-part pieces by Vincenzo Galilei, in 1585 a reprint of Arcadelt’s Il primo libro di madrigali a quattro voci, and in 1596/7 Stefano Venturi del Nibbio’s Il terzo libro de madrigali a cinque...

Article

Henri Vanhulst

(b Harderwijk, 1613/14; d Amsterdam, bur. Dec 5, 1684). Dutch bookseller, printer and publisher . His shop ‘in’t Musyckboeck’ was in the Stoof-Steegh, Amsterdam, and his business (not exclusively musical) began in 1640; his heirs, Alida and Maria Matthysz, continued it from 1681 to about 1720. He printed several editions for booksellers in Amsterdam (E. Cloppenburch, J. Jansz, Ludwig Elzevier etc.) and brought out others on his own account, including reissues. He sometimes accompanied the text with a Dutch translation or replaced it with an original Dutch text, as in Gastoldi’s Balletten … met drie stemmen: ende nu verrijckt met de vierde partije … ende op gheestelijcke gesangen gheset (1641). Matthysz also published compositions and treatises by local composers, including Ban, Jacobus Haffner, Joseph Butler, Van Eyck, G.Q. van Blankenburg and Carolus Hacquardt. Among his most important publications are collections of instrumental pieces, 20 Koninklijcke fantasien...

Article

Brian Priestley

(John )

(b Camborne, England, April 17, 1920; d London, Oct 3, 1987). English writer. He became interested in jazz in the mid-1930s and established contact with record collectors such as Max Jones, Charles Fox, and Leonard Hibbs. In 1942 McCarthy and Jones founded the Jazz Sociological Society and became the editors of its journal, Jazz Music; from 1944 to 1946, to circumvent wartime rationing of paper, the journal was temporarily discontinued and instead a series of separate booklets entitled Jazz Music Books was issued. McCarthy then edited the short-lived Jazz Forum: Quarterly Review of Jazz and Literature (1946–7), and, with Dave Carey, compiled six volumes of a discography of jazz. From 1955 to 1972 he was editor of the influential periodical Jazz Monthly, which, in addition to its catholic coverage of jazz and blues, also included items on related topics such as the record industry; in March 1971...

Article

Ian Brookes

(b New York, NY, Jan 16, 1884; d Palm Springs, CA, April 21, 1985). American Impresario, music publisher, band manager, record producer, songwriter, and singer. He was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants who settled in New York. There, as a teenager, he worked as a song plugger and singer before establishing a music publishing business in 1919 with his brother Jack. With its emphasis on the work of black musicians, Mills Music became an important locus for jazz and dance band music. A shrewd business operator with a sharp eye for talent, Mills extended his business interests in the 1920s. He became manager of the Duke Ellington Orchestra (1926–39) and promoted several other African American bandleaders including Cab Calloway, Benny Carter, Fletcher Henderson, Jimmie Lunceford, and Don Redman. He also organized a series of recording sessions under his own nominal leadership, Irving Mills and His Hotsy Totsy Gang (...

Article

David Scott

revised by Richard Alston

( Charles Peter )

( b London, Feb 6, 1925). English musicologist, publisher and administrator . He studied at Dulwich College (1939–42) and from 1945 taught in London. He is largely self-taught in music, although he spent one year at Durham University (1949–50), where he studied with Arthur Hutchings and A.E.F. Dickinson. In 1947 he founded Music Survey and edited it (from 1949 with Hans Keller) until it ceased publication in 1952 (it was reprinted in full in 1981). From 1953 to 1957 he wrote regularly for the Musical Times, and from 1958 to 1962 edited Tempo for Boosey & Hawkes, for which firm he was music adviser in 1963–4. He was on the music staff of the Daily Telegraph (1959–64), and in 1964 music critic for The Listener. In 1958 he was appointed head of the music department of Faber & Faber; following a suggestion from Benjamin Britten in ...

Article

Ronald D. Stetzel

[Möller, Johann Christoph]

(b Germany, 1755; d New York, Sept 21, 1803). British-American composer, organist, concert manager and music publisher of German birth. After about a decade in London, where his principal works were published (c1775–85), he moved to the USA. He was prominent in the musical life of Philadelphia (October 1790–November 1795) as organist of Zion Lutheran Church and co-manager (with Reinagle) of the City Concerts (1790–93), performing as a pianist, harpsichordist and violist. In New York he was organist of Trinity Episcopal Church and concert manager at fashionable summer pleasure gardens. Moller's and Capron's press (established in March 1793) was among the earliest in the USA for the exclusive printing of music, and Moller alone issued over 40 publications.

Article

Paula Morgan

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(Michael)

(b Munich, Oct 24, 1929). American writer. He grew up in Vienna, but left in 1938 and spent the next nine years as a refugee in Denmark and Sweden. After moving to the USA in 1947 he studied history at Brandeis University (1953–6). From 1958 to 1961 he was the New York correspondent for Jazz Journal. He then served as editor of Metronome (1961), Jazz (1962–3), and Down Beat (New York editor, 1964–6, editor 1966–73) magazines; during the 1960s he also produced jazz concerts in New York and for television. In the mid-1970s he held appointments as visiting lecturer in jazz at Brooklyn College and the Peabody Institute, and in 1976 he became director of the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers, in which capacity he has worked as an editor of the Journal of Jazz Studies (from 1982 the Annual Review of Jazz Studies...

Article

( b Berlin, March 18, 1733; d Berlin, Jan 8, 1811). German editor, author and bookseller . In the 1750s he was one of the leaders of the movement opposing the dominance of French literary taste in Germany. He was an advocate of Klopstock's and Wieland's works and was an important figure in the group that included Lessing and Moses Mendelssohn. Though prominent in the German Enlightenment during the 1750s and 1760s, particularly through his Allgemeine deutsche Bibliothek, he was sharply critical of the work of Goethe, Herder, Hamann and other representatives of the growing Romantic movement in Germany in the following decades. His displeasure with the early Romantic interest in folksong (in which he saw amateurish and anti-intellectual tendencies) is reflected in the mock-archaic orthography of the title of his satirical collection Eyn feyner kleyner Almanach (1777–8). The two volumes of this work contain 61 unaccompanied songs (27 anonymous or folktunes, 22 by J.F. Reichardt and 12 composed or arranged by Nicolai); 50 of the songs were later included in Kretzschmer and Zuccamaglio's ...

Article

(b north of Dundee, Angus, Nov 1600; d London, Sept 4, 1676). Scottish dancing-master, theatrical impresario, writer, publisher and possibly composer , active partly in Ireland. A man of extraordinary versatility who was adept at attracting influential patronage, he successfully survived many misfortunes. His career began as a dancer at the court of Charles I. After a fall during a court masque in 1621 he was forced to give up dancing and became a dancing master and choreographer. About 1633 he accompanied the Duke of Wentworth (later the Earl of Strafford) to Dublin. He is important in the history of music in Ireland as the first holder there of the title of Master of the Revels, a position created for him by the Earl as Lord Deputy on 28 February 1638. In this capacity he erected in Werburgh Street, close to Dublin Castle, the first theatre to be built in the British Isles outside London. On the outbreak of the Civil War in ...

Article

Paul van Reijen

(b Elburg, 1695/6; d Amsterdam, bur. May 14, 1768). Dutch music publisher and bookseller . On 8 May 1732 Olofsen gave notice of his intended marriage to Dirkje Jacobs in Amsterdam. He was received into the Amsterdam guild of booksellers on 9 August 1734, four days after he had settled up his burghership. In 1742 his annual income was fixed at 800 guilders, while he had his bookshop in Gravenstraat. In 1743 Olofsen was charged with the printing and selling of a ‘defamatory’ text. Later on he was imprisoned for the dissemination of libellous publications; he was released on 19 November 1749. In the late 1750s the imprint on Olofsen's editions changed to ‘Aan [At] de Nieuwe Kerk, over de Voorburgwal’. His widow was buried in Amsterdam on 28 January 1780.

A catalogue of 1755 contains about 80 titles; among them are Olofsen's own printings of chamber music, concertos and vocal pieces of Dutch composers such as J.P.A. Fischer, Leonard Frischmuth, Hurlebusch, Mahaut, F.G. Michelet and Radeker. Besides original Dutch treatises of Leonard Frischmuth, S.T. van Loonsma and Lustig, Olofsen published theoretical works, translated into Dutch by Lustig, of Quantz (...

Article

André Clergeat

(b Paris, Feb 27, 1912; d Montauban, Dec 8, 1974). French writer on jazz. After studying the saxophone he first wrote about jazz at the age of 18. He was one of the founders (in 1932) and then president of the Hot Club de France, and from 1935 to 1946 he was the editor of the journal Jazz-hot. With his unrivalled enthusiasm for communication, Panassié wrote hundreds of articles for this and other periodicals and was the author of several books, notably Le jazz hot, an important study that was among the first to treat jazz seriously. In 1938 Count Basie dedicated to him and recorded a composition called Panassié Stomp. The same year, in New York, Panassié organized a series of small-group recording sessions with Mezz Mezzrow which also included (at various times) Tommy Ladnier and Sidney Bechet; these were highly influential and contributed considerably to the New Orleans revival movement. In ...

Article

(fl 1607–41). Italian bookseller and printer, active in Florence . He matriculated in the Arte dei medici e speziali on 15 November 1607 and by 1614 had become head of the printing firm founded by Giorgio Marescotti and continued by his son Cristofano. He was also a singer trained in the choir of Florence Cathedral. Pignoni made an auspicious entry into music printing in 1614–15 with no fewer than six editions, including masses and motets by Marco da Gagliano, madrigals by Giovanni del Turco, and Giulio Caccini’s Nuove musiche e nuova maniera di scriverle. This initiative was prompted by a generous, if shortlived, financial investment in the firm (in June 1614) by three prominent Florentine patrons, Giovanni del Turco, Lodovico Arrighetti and (for Cosimo del Sera) Giovanni Battista da Gagliano: hence the imprint ‘Zanobi Pignoni, e Compagni’.

Thereafter Pignoni diversified his interests, printing poetry, occasional items and descrizioni...

Article

Colin Timms

( b Samarugio, Rome, c 1580; d Rome, March 10, 1673). Italian music publisher and book dealer . Described in documents of the period as a ‘cartulario’ and ‘librarius’, he built up his publishing concern from a bookdealer’s business that he had probably founded himself. It was situated in central Rome (Parione), and his sign, which appears in his publications, was a hammer. Following his marriage in 1607 he had at least four children of whom one, Giovanni (b 17 July 1612; d 30 Sept 1675), followed his father’s occupation. Both father and son were buried at S Maria in Vallicella (the Chiesa Nuova) in Rome.

Antonio Poggioli published most types of instrumental and sacred and secular vocal music, including reprints of Arcadelt, Lupacchino and Tasso, a complete edition of Cifra’s motets and important anthologies of motets. His publications date from 1620 to 1668 and represent the work of seven Roman printers, among them Robletti, Masotti, Grignani and Mascardi. Giovanni Poggioli is known only as the editor of the later of the two, slightly different, editions of the ...

Article

Clare Iannota Nielsen

(b Lona, c1510; d Venice, ?1576). Italian printer and bookseller. He was active in Venice and worked in the parish of S Giovanni Novo, with a shop on the calle delle Rasse. In 1572 he was elected Prior of the Guild of Booksellers and Printers, succeeding Girolamo Scotto. Working mainly on commission for others, Rampazetto produced at least 190 books in Italian, Latin, Greek or Spanish; literary works, notably reprints, figure prominently in his output.

From 1561 until 1568 he printed music – 31 sets of partbooks, one theory book and a book of laudi spirituali. The last, Serafino Razzi’s voluminous collection (RISM 15636), was sent to Rampazetto by the Florentine publisher Filippo Giunta because Florence had no musical press at the time. Among his other commissions were an anthology of motets (1563³) compiled and edited by the printer Antonio Barrè, and the second book of Vinci’s five-part madrigals (...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(b London, c1728; d London, ?Jan 1776). English music seller and publisher, brother of John Randall. He was a son or more probably a grandson of Peter Randall, a London music publisher associated with John Walsh, and was presumably the Randall found among the Children of the Chapel Royal from 1736 to 1745. At the death of his cousin John Walsh in 1766, he and John Abell inherited the extensive Walsh business, where they had doubtless been employed. They published for the first time the complete full scores of a number of Handel oratorios, starting with Messiah (1767). After Abell's death on 29 July 1768, Randall remained in business alone. Besides reprinting Walsh publications, sometimes with the original imprint in addition to his own, he published many interesting works, including a reissue in 1771 of Morley's A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke. Collections of country dances and pleasure-garden songs also came from his press. At his death, his widow Elizabeth carried on the business until ...

Article

Frank Kidson, William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(fl 1737–c1782). English engraver, print-seller and publisher in London. From 1737 until about 1762 he kept a music and print shop in Holborn from which he issued several notable books of songs with pictorial embellishments heading each piece. The earliest, the two-volume Calliope, or English Harmony, was issued from 1737 by and for the engraver in periodical numbers of eight octavo pages each at sixpence per number. The first volume of 25 numbers was completed in 1739; the parts of the second volume began to appear in the same year, though it was probably not finished until about 1746. John Simpson brought out second issues of volume one in 1740 and of volume two in 1747. Late in 1741 Roberts and John Johnson (successor to the Wrights), were accused by Thomas Arne of violating his copyright by printing some of his songs in the second volume of ...

Article

Evan Baker

(b Brno, Oct 2, 1864; d Vienna, June 12, 1935). Austrian stage designer. At Vienna University he studied law and then art history; in 1884 he enrolled at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste and studied painting and architecture under Lichtenfels and Griepenkerl. During the 1890s Roller belonged to a circle of young Viennese artists which in 1897 evolved into the Sezession movement, of which Roller was a co-founder. He was elected its president in 1902 and served as editor of its journal, Ver Sacrum.

Mahler, director of the Vienna Hofoper, first met Roller that year and invited him to design a new Tristan und Isolde; its subsequent production (21 February 1903) was a landmark in the history of stage design. In what was to be his fundamental style, Roller used clear, intense colour and lighting as well as architectural simplicity and clarity, clearing the stage of excessive scenic and decorative clutter....

Article

Daniel Zager

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[Robert (D.) ]

(b New York, c1945). American writer. He studied clarinet and drums and played drums in workshops with Jaki Byard (1968–71) and Cedar Walton (1972). In the 1960s and 1970s he wrote for American and European periodicals, including Down Beat, Jazz Journal, and Jazz Forum, and in 1975 he began publishing the monthly magazine Cadence, which in the following years printed many wide-ranging interviews with jazz and blues musicians and reviews of recordings. Later he formed Cadence Jazz Records (1980), which by the late 1990s had issued more than 100 recordings; North Country Record Distribution (1983), which distributes the jazz and blues recordings of more than 900 small independent labels; Cadence Jazz Books (1992), which publishes reference books, histories, and discographies; and CIMP (1996), for which he had produced about 100 recordings by the turn of the century. He donated his extensive indexed collection of books and journals, covering jazz and blues literature in the English language, to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of the New York Public Library (...