81-100 of 311 results  for:

  • Traditional, Folk and Indigenous Musics x
Clear all

Article

Boy  

Generic term for drum, used by the Dogon people of Mali. The term also refers to the rhythm beaten for the dance and to the dancing place itself (boy yala). The large and small double-headed cylindrical drums, boy na and boy dagi, respectively, have laced skins; they are played in a slanting position (the ...

Article

Boyeke  

K.A. Gourlay

Scraper of the Konda people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made from a wooden stick or piece of bamboo with a wide longitudinal slit and notches cut in the edges throughout its length. Among the Komo people scrapers of this type are known as ...

Article

Lyre of the Nuba people of western Sudan.

Article

Buanru  

Vessel rattle of the Bariba people of north Benin. It is a gourd with internal pellets, used to accompany singing, mainly at funerals, and is played by shaking, slapping against the open palm of the free hand, or being struck with a leather shoe sole....

Article

Bubu  

Large cylindrical slit drum of the Ngbandi people of the Ubangi region, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

J.-S. Laurenty: Les tambours à fente de l’Afrique centrale (Tervuren, 1968), 133 only.

Article

Budongo  

Lamellaphone of the Ganda and Soga peoples of Uganda. It has a box resonator and 11 tongues, tuned pentatonically.

Article

Budugu  

Long, open, single-headed hourglass drum of the Barma people of Chad. Its head is laced by cords to a ring surrounding the body two-thirds of the way down. The head, waxed in the centre, is struck with both hands. The drum is used as part of an instrumental ensemble to encourage canoeists and give them strength....

Article

Lucy Durán and David Font-Navarrete

Set of three or four single-headed drums of the Jola people of Senegal and the Gambia. The drums, from 65 to 140 cm long and 23 to 45 cm in diameter, are usually carved from buchelab or buyey logs into a slightly conical shape, often with a flare near the open end, and are typically decorated with simple carving or paint. The heads are made from cowhide or, less often, goatskin and attached to the shell with wood pegs and leather strips. Each drum in the set is variously tuned by heating at an open fire. They are played as a set, always by one male drummer, arranged side by side, propped at an angle, and tilted away from the drummer against a wooden stand, with the open end on the ground. The drummer plays with his bare hands and has iron jingles (...

Article

Buguloo  

Bell of the Sisala people of northern Ghana. Large pellet bells of cast brass, strung on a wire or sewn to a band of hide, are attached to a clapper bell.

Article

‘Spirit drum’ of the Acholi people of northern Uganda. It has one pegged head. The ends of the drum are of approximately the same width, while the body curves outwards from the skin, then inwards until near the open base, where it curves outwards again....

Article

K.A. Gourlay and Peter Cooke

Set of six percussion reeds of the Uango people of Uganda. They are tuned to represent a set of six drums and played for practice by young boys. Each reed is partly broken in two places and bent into a Ushape so that the arms can be stuck in the ground and the middle portion beaten with sticks. The reeds are erected in a line in order of size, the middle section of the largest measuring about 40 cm long, with the end of each middle section touching the next. The set is played by two boys, each with two beaters....

Article

Bulo  

Bracelet of pellet bells worn by xylophone players among the Sisala people of northern Ghana.

Article

Single-headed, footed conical drum of the Digo, Giryama, and other peoples of Kenya. On some examples the head, made of cow or antelope hide or goatskin, is secured by a thick ring and a small number of cords; on others it is pegged to the body, which is typically about 48 cm tall and 28 cm in head diameter. The Digo use their ...

Article

Buru  

Side-blown trumpet of the Bambara people of Mali. It is made of either antelope horn or ivory and is also used by the Vai people of Liberia. It is cognate with the Jola b’ru, Maninka budu, and Mende bulu.

Article

Bullroarer of the Khoikhoi (Korana Hottentot) people of southern Africa.

Article

Musical bow of Cuba. Probably derived from the Angolan mbulumbumba, it is made from cane or wood about 75 cm to 1 m long with a single vegetal or gut (nowadays sometimes metal) string braced to the bow slightly below the midpoint. An open half-gourd resonator 15–20 cm in diameter is tied to the outer curve of the bow opposite the brace. The gourd opening is moved towards and away from the player’s stomach to vary the timbre as he plucks the string with one finger. The ...

Article

Butyu  

Ox-horn horn of the Bomvana (Xhosa) people of southern Africa; it resembles the Zulu uphondo, blown by young men to announce successful courtship and formerly used for signalling in war or hunting.

See also Impalampala .

Article

Bwanga  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

End-blown flute of the Sere people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made of a conical animal horn and has three or more fingerholes. A flute with four fingerholes is called se.

F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Side-blown ivory trumpet of the Bati people of the Uele region, Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has a carved embouchure.

J.S. Laurenty: Systématique des aerophones de l’Afrique centrale (Tervuren, 1974), 351.

Article

Bwango  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Side-blown animal horn of the Dongo people of the Ubangi region, Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has one fingerhole in the tip.

J.S. Laurenty: Systématique des aerophones de l’Afrique centrale (Tervuren, 1974), 324.