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H. Wiley Hitchcock

revised by Katherine K. Preston

(b Norfolk, VA, July 1, 1909, d New York, Sept 18, 1996). American pianist, editor, and music historian. She studied piano (with Josef and Rosina Lhévinne) and theory at the Juilliard School (1928–30). She pursued a career as a concert pianist (1930–64), performed in a duo (with Harold Triggs, 1932–6) that championed young American composers, and served as a staff pianist for CBS radio (1939–46). She abruptly gave up performance upon her husband’s death (1964) and embarked on a second career as a scholar. Lawrence was administrator of publications for the Contemporary Music Project (1967–70) and compiled and edited a three-volume catalogue (1968; 2/1969) of the CMP Library (c 500 works). She also edited notable facsimile publications of the piano compositions of Louis Gottschalk and Scott Joplin, as well as the complete run of Arthur Farwell’s Wa-Wan Press. Her book on music and American politics during the 18th and 19th centuries (...

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Anik Devriès

(b Sézanne en Brie, Oct 20, 1697; d Paris, Oct 20, 1774). French music publisher and violinist, younger brother of Jean-Pantaléon Le Clerc. The brothers have often been confused owing to the similarity of their activities and the infrequent use of Jean-Pantaléon’s first name. Charles-Nicolas Le Clerc’s name appears for the first time in the list of violinists of the Académie Royale de Musique in 1729 and in that of the 24 Violons du Roi in 1732. He held the former post until 22 May 1750 and the latter until 1761. His talents as a violinist were frequently mentioned during that period in accounts of concerts published in the Mercure de France.

Le Clerc began publishing music in 1736 and remained in the business until his death; the first privileges registered in his name date from 9 March 1736 and 17 November 1738; his first catalogue (1738...

Article

Anik Devriès

(b ?Sézanne en Brie, before 1697; d after 1759). French publisher and violinist, the elder brother of Charles-Nicolas Le Clerc. He lived at the ‘Croix d’Or’, rue du Roule, Paris, from 1728 to 1758. Having entered the 24 Violons du Roi on 17 July 1720, he remained a member until 1760. A periodical advertisement dated October 1728 announced the start of his career as a music commission agent. Up to 1753 his name was often associated with that of Boivin, both on the title-pages of works and in music advertisements. There seems to have been a tacit agreement between the two dealers; they shared the Parisian music market and the same works are listed in their respective catalogues. Their trade was supplied by the composers themselves, mainly by those having had their works engraved at their own expense. They also represented French and foreign publishers such as Ballard, Charles-Nicolas Le Clerc and Michel-Charles Le Cène....

Article

Samuel F. Pogue

revised by Frank Dobbins

(b Montreuil-sur-Mer, c1520; d Paris, 1598). French music printer, lutenist and composer. He was born into a wealthy merchant family from northern France. As a young man he entered successively the service of two members of the aristocracy close to the French throne, Claude de Clermont and Jacques II, Baron de Semblançay and Viscount of Tours. In March 1546 he became acquainted with the editor Jean de Brouilly in Paris, bought some properties from him in St Denis and married his daughter Denise (d before 1570). He moved to Brouilly’s house at the sign of Ste Geneviève (later the sign of Mount Parnassus) in the rue St Jean-de-Beauvais – an address which was to become famous as the home of one of the greatest of the French music printing establishments.

On 14 August 1551 Le Roy and his cousin Robert Ballard obtained a privilege from Henri II to print and sell all kinds of music books. Their first publication appeared at the end of the same month. On ...

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Brian Boydell

(b ?Dublin; d Dublin, Feb 21, 1776). Irish publisher, music seller and violinist. He was one of the most prominent and active musicians in Dublin during the 1750s and 60s. In 1745 he was admitted to the City Music, of which he was appointed bandmaster in 1752 at a salary of £40, increased to £60 in 1753. During this period he was appearing regularly as principal violinist at the summer open-air concerts at Marlborough Green between 1750 and 1756 and as conductor of the annual performance of Handel’s Messiah at the Great Musick Hall in Fishamble Street. In July 1751 he became violinist and musical director in the syndicate which leased Crow Street Musick Hall for the six years before it was taken over, rebuilt and opened as a theatre.

Samuel Lee was founder of the music shop and publishing firm which carried out business at Little Green, off Bolton Street (...

Article

Arthur Jacobs

revised by Noël Goodwin

(Mathias)

(b London, Nov 19, 1934). English conductor, editor and translator. After reading Russian and German at Oxford University, he studied music privately with Iain Hamilton. As a Russian-language specialist, his first professional engagement was to coach Boris Godunov in Russian at Covent Garden in 1959. He assisted John Pritchard in preparing the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra’s ‘Musica Viva’ series in 1960, and became chorus master and assistant conductor of the New Opera Company the same year. In 1963 he began guest engagements with the BBC Welsh Orchestra and other orchestras. He conducted Scottish Opera in his own translation of Boris Godunov in 1967 and gave the first British performances of Fauré’s Pénélope (1970, RAM) and Haydn’s La fedeltà premiata (1971, Camden Festival). He was engaged by the Welsh National Opera and the Wexford Festival, and made his Covent Garden début with Boris Godunov in 1971. The next year he joined Sadler’s Wells Opera as assistant to the musical director and conducted, with conspicuous success, the first British stage performances of Prokofiev’s ...

Article

Anne Dhu McLucas

(d Boston, Aug 3, 1834). American organist, singer, publisher and composer . He was probably of French origin, and may have emigrated to America from London. His first public concert appearances in the USA were in Philadelphia and Newport, Rhode Island, in 1793. In the same year he settled in Boston, where he served as church organist and sang and played in concerts. His reputation as a performer rested mainly on his singing of oratorios. In 1801, with Gottlieb Graupner and Filippo Trajetta, he established the first conservatory of music in the USA. The ‘Conservatorio’ or ‘musical academy’ in Rowe’s Lane operated only from 1801 to 1802; during this time Graupner and Mallet were publishing partners, issuing around 20 items. From 1803 to 1807 Mallet published music independently and was a distributor in Boston for the Philadelphia publishers Carr and Schetky; he also sold American and English pianos (...

Article

Steve Smith

(Marc )

(b Chicago, Dec 26, 1950). American writer. He learned piano and flute as a child and pursued his formal education at Syracuse University (1970–72), Mills College (1972), and Roosevelt College (1973–5); he also studied boogie-woogie, swing, and blues piano with leading players in Chicago. In 1975 he embarked on his writing career, working for Down Beat (as associate editor, 1978–81), The Wire, Musical America, Tower Pulse!, the Village Voice, the Washington Post, Billboard, the New York Times Book Review, and Jazziz. He contributed scripts for jazz shows on NPR and held editorial positions at Guitar World (1982–3), Ear (1987–92), the JVC Jazz Festival program guide published by Tower Pulse! (from 1994), and Rhythm Music (1996–7). Mandel was a founder of the Jazz Journalists’ Association: in 1992 he became its president and in 1997 editor of its website, ...

Article

Brian Boydell

( b ?Dublin; d Dublin, 1763). Irish music publisher, music seller, instrument dealer and violinist . He worked from about 1738 in the business established by his brother Bartholemew (d July 1758) about a year previously at Corelli’s Head, opposite Anglesea Street in College Green, Dublin. In April 1740 he advertised a proposal for printing Geminiani’s Guida armonica by subscription; it was finally issued in about 1752. Notable publications by him include collections of songs from Arne’s Comus, Dubourg’s variations on the Irish melody ‘Ellen a Roon’ and in December 1752 ‘six Trios for 2 Fiddles and thorough Bass composed by Sieur Van Maldere’. From 1741 a number of publications were issued in conjunction with William Neale, including the Monthly Musical Masque consisting of a collection of contemporary popular songs; the first issue was advertised in January 1744. Manwaring also imported Peter Wamsley’s best violins, Roman fiddle strings and ‘all the newest music published in London’. In addition to his business he took a prominent part in Dublin musical life during the 1740s as a violinist, often appearing with his brother who was also a violinist. He acted as treasurer of various charitable musical societies. After his death his wife carried on the business until ...

Article

Horace Clarence Boyer

revised by Roxanne R. Reed

(b Pittfield, GA, Nov 20, 1896; d Chicago, IL, June 18, 1988). American gospel singer and music publisher. Martin joined the Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Pentecostal) while living in Atlanta, an affiliation that defined her earliest gospel influences. Martin, her husband, and their son moved to Chicago in the 1920s. She met thomas a. Dorsey in 1929 and began a decade-long collaboration and partnership. Vocally, Martin lacked polish and had a rough, dark quality to her voice that, nonetheless, held appeal. Her tendency to speak versus actually sing matched Dorsey’s intent for a preacher-like quality in his development of solo gospel music. Martin joined Dorsey’s University Radio Singers, and later his chorus at Pilgrim Baptist Church. She made her debut in 1932, although not primarily as a soloist. Her association with Dorsey broadened into a business partnership. She began handling the publication and sale of his music, resulting in widespread popularity for both of them. Expanding their renown even further, Martin joined Dorsey in organizing the National Convention of Gospel Choirs and Choruses, through which they traveled and performed. Martin remained associated with Dorsey and the Convention until ...

Article

Geoffrey Burgess

(b Sept 9, 1913; d New York, Dec 21, 1978). American oboist, researcher and publisher. As well as being active as a performer of contemporary music for oboe, Marx’s reputation is based on his pioneering contributions to the revival of the Baroque oboe. After studying with the principal oboist of the Cincinnati SO, he established a lasting friendship with the composer Stefan Wolpe, with whom he studied composition. He played in the Jerusalem SO under Toscanini (1936–7), and during leave travelled to England for lessons with Leon Goossens. Illness prevented him from being drafted in World War II, enabling him to develop a career as an oboist in the USA, where he played with the Ballet Theatre of New York (1940–42), the Pittsburgh SO (1942–3), the Metropolitan Opera (1943–50), and as an adjunct member of the New York PO (...

Article

Sorab Modi

revised by Richard R. Bunbury

(b Bunceton, MO, Sept 1, 1917; d Staten Island, NY, Oct 7, 2007). American conductor, organist, and editor. He studied at Concordia College in River Forest, Illinois, the University of Chicago (BA 1942), the American Conservatory (BMus 1944, MMus 1946), and Yale University (PhD 1960); he also studied conducting with Nikolai Malko. He was music director at Zion Lutheran School in Chicago (1938–48) and a member of the organ and theory faculty at the American Conservatory (1945–7). From 1957 to 1966 he was an assistant professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and from 1967 until his retirement in 1983 he was a professor of music at the College of Staten Island in New York City. From his retirement until 1995 he was director of the Collegium Musicum in the Lutheran Summer Music Program. As an organist and choir director Mattfeld was associated with several churches in Chicago, New York, New Jersey, and New England (...

Article

Deane L. Root

[James] (Francis)

(b Boston, July 10, 1894; d Beverly Hills, CA, May 23, 1969). American songwriter, pianist and music publisher. He learnt the piano from his mother, and in 1915 became a rehearsal pianist for the Boston Opera. From 1916 he was a song-plugger in Boston for Irving Berlin Music and from 1921 in New York for the F.A. Mills Co., of which he later became a partner. In the 1920s he wrote several popular songs, including When My Sugar Walks Down the Street (1924), and revues for the Cotton Club in Harlem. In 1928 he began a long association with the lyricist Dorothy Fields; their all-black revue Blackbirds of 1928 included the song ‘I can’t give you anything but love’, which was an early success for dancer Bill ‘Bojangles’ Robinson. Fields and McHugh were among the most successful songwriters in Hollywood in the 1930s, writing for such films as ...

Article

(b Brussels, May 28, 1777; d Paris, Dec 18, 1858). Flemish composer, conductor, publisher and teacher. He was the son of Henri Mees (b Brussels, 1757; d Warsaw, 31 Jan 1820), principal baritone of the Théâtre de la Monnaie, Brussels, and of Anne-Marie Vitzthumb, a singer. He showed precocious musical talent: at the age of five he sang in a church choir, at seven he began to study the violin and at ten he played in the orchestra of the Monnaie. He had further violin studies with J.-E. Pauwels and lessons in harmony and counterpoint with his grandfather Ignaz Vitzthumb. In 1794, during the second French occupation, the family emigrated to Hamburg, where Henri Mees and other Brussels artists established a theatre for the Comédie-Française; Joseph-Henri occasionally sang secondary roles and conducted the orchestra there. He also opened a music shop, from which he published works from the Parisian repertory....

Article

Richard Jackson

[?Richard ]

(fl c1806–36). Pianist, teacher, publisher, and composer, probably of French origin. He was one of the many musicians in New York in the early 19th century who dabbled in several musical activities in order to earn a living. Meetz was listed as a music teacher in New York directories from 1810 to 1836 (he claimed in newspaper advertisements to have been a pupil of Mozart). He also appeared as a pianist, sold pianos, and sold and published music. Meetz was primarily the New York agent for the Philadelphia music publisher George E. Blake, though he did publish a few titles under his own name; two of his works for piano, General Lafayette’s Grand March and Quick Step (1824) and General Montgomery’s Dead March (?1818), bear a Philadelphia imprint. He was probably related to the pianist Cesarine Meetz and the pianist and singer Julius Metz...

Article

Joanne Swenson-Eldridge

(b 1793; d Philadelphia, June 4, 1873). American conductor, composer, publisher and teacher of French birth . He was a bandmaster in Napoleon’s army before emigrating to the USA, where he settled in Philadelphia (1828). In 1833 he was elected a member of the Musical Fund Society; that same year he founded the Philharmonic Society, an amateur orchestra in Philadelphia. His transcriptions of operatic excerpts and popular songs for the guitar date from as early as 1832. In 1835 he joined the music publisher Augustus Fiot in establishing the firm of Fiot and Meignen. After their partnership was dissolved in 1839, Meignen continued in the music publishing business until 1842. He succeeded Charles Hupfeld as conductor of the Musical Fund Society Orchestra during the 1844–5 season and held the post until 1857; his Grand Military Symphony was first performed under his direction on 17 April 1845. He also conducted the première of William Henry Fry’s ...

Article

John Griffiths

(bc1500; dc 1560). Spanish musician and writer. He is best known as the author of the first printed vihuela music, the Libro de musica de vihuela de mano intitulado El maestro (Valencia, 1536/R1975; ed. R. Chiesa, Milan, 1965, and C. Jacobs, University Park, PA, 1971). Along with his book of court games, Libro de motes de damas y cavalleros, intitulado El juego de mandar (Valencia, 1535), it was composed during his residence at the Valencian court of Germaine de Foix, where he remained until at least 1538. Establishing Milán's biography is made difficult by the existence of documents pertaining to more than one person of the same name. It is possible that he was a Valencian nobleman, son of Lluis del Milà, lord of Massalavés and Violant Eixarch. In this case, he took minor orders before 1542, became rector of the parish church of Onda (Tortosa), married before ...

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Ian Brookes

(b New York, NY, Jan 16, 1884; d Palm Springs, CA, April 21, 1985). American Impresario, music publisher, band manager, record producer, songwriter, and singer. He was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants who settled in New York. There, as a teenager, he worked as a song plugger and singer before establishing a music publishing business in 1919 with his brother Jack. With its emphasis on the work of black musicians, Mills Music became an important locus for jazz and dance band music. A shrewd business operator with a sharp eye for talent, Mills extended his business interests in the 1920s. He became manager of the Duke Ellington Orchestra (1926–39) and promoted several other African American bandleaders including Cab Calloway, Benny Carter, Fletcher Henderson, Jimmie Lunceford, and Don Redman. He also organized a series of recording sessions under his own nominal leadership, Irving Mills and His Hotsy Totsy Gang (...

Article

Robert Strizich, Gary R. Boye and Richard Pinnell

( b Bologna; fl mid-17th century). Italian ?guitarist and music editor . He was co-editor with Millioni of Vero e facil modo d’imparare a sonare et accordare da se medesimo la chitarra spagnuola (Rome and Macerata, 1637, and many times reprinted), an instruction book for the battute style of playing the guitar which shares several features with Millioni’s other volume. ‘The c.1640 reprint of Vero e facil modo is sometimes dated as 1627, but has no date and is more likely a later, expanded version of Millioni/Monte 1637, with 16 additional pieces and 18 songs with text and alfabeto only. Surprisingly, all of the additional solo guitar pieces are taken from Milanuzzi 1623, pp. 45-48 and 52-54, in their same order…. This version is undated, but a similar edition, with identical contents, was published in 1644’ (Boye, ‘Applications’). Monte also edited a similar volume on his own, Vago fior di virtù, dove si contiene il vero modo per sonare la chitarriglia spagnuola...