1,021-1,040 of 57,944 results

Article

Gary Carner and Barry Kernfeld

(bResistencia, Argentina, Feb 20, 1909; dBuenos Aires, Oct 10, 1980). Argentineguitarist. He first danced in the folk troupe of his father, the guitarist Jorge Alemán Moreira, but when he was ten his father died. Self-taught, he took up cavaquinho (a four-stringed Brazilian ukulele) and guitar, and in ...

Article

(b c1435; d after 1504). Italian philosopher and biblical exegete. He wrote briefly on music in his Ḥesheq shelomoh (‘Solomon's desire’), a commentary on the Song of Solomon, written during the period 1488–92 at the request of Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. Music is discussed in relation to Hebrew poetics, then classified for its varieties and described for its powers. Under poetics, Alemanno notes that the word ...

Article

Alemba  

Laurence Libin

Keyboard percussion instrument invented by the Australian composer and instrument maker Moya Henderson (b Quirindi, New South Wales, 2 Aug 1941) and the acoustician Neville Fletcher. In 1976 the German sculptor Helfried Hagenberg commissioned Henderson to compose a work to be played on a sculpture he had made from 27 triangles. This project led Henderson to investigate the musical potential of large triangles, and supported by grants from the Federal Department of Science and Technology, the A.S. White Trust, and the Myer Foundation, she devised a prototype alemba (the name comes from ‘alembic’), which was introduced in ...

Article

Thomas Christensen

(b Paris, Nov 16, 1717; d Paris, Oct 29, 1783). French philosopher, mathematician and music theorist. He was abandoned by his mother as a child, and raised in a modest household by an artisan’s wife. A precocious child, he received a good education at a Jansenist school, and went on to study medicine and law. His true passion, though, was mathematics, and he soon abandoned his legal studies in order to devote all his energies to the subject. His particular interest lay in the field of rational mechanics, an important discipline in the 18th century, in which physical problems and phenomena were analysed in the abstract, using mathematics and geometry. D’Alembert submitted his first paper to the Royal Academy of Sciences in ...

Article

Alembic  

Tony Bacon

American manufacturer of electric bass guitars, six-string electric guitars, preamps, and related accessories, located in Santa Rosa, California. The recording engineer and Ampex designer Ron Wickersham and his wife, the painter Susan Frates, began the company in 1969 as a consulting firm to improve performance and recording audio quality for such bands as the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, and Crosby Stills Nash & Young. They soon moved to premises in San Francisco and while continuing to provide audio services to touring bands, opened a repair facility, recording studio, and retail store. The firm then turned to providing new components for guitars and basses, designing new pickups, and remodelling instruments. Alembic electronics and pickups were first installed in David Crosby’s 12-string Guild guitar and Phil Lesh’s (Grateful Dead) psychedelic SG bass; next, Lesh’s and Jack Casady’s (Jefferson Airplane) hollow-body basses were retrofitted with new low-impedance pickups and ‘active electronics’, a system that uses a built-in preamp to boost the volume and widen the frequency range. Alembic also renovated Bobby Weir’s and Jerry Garcia’s guitars. This work led the firm, which included Owsley (‘The Bear’) Stanley, the guitar builder Rick Turner, and designer Geoff Gould, to produce its own Standard Series I and II electric guitars and basses, promoted from the mid-1970s by the bassist Stanley Clarke, among other well-known performers....

Article

Suzanne G. Cusick

(b Ferrara, c1570; d after 1646). Italian composer and organist. One of the five daughters the Ferrarese court architect Giovanni Battista Aleotti acknowledged in his 1631 will, she was prioress of the musically renowned Augustinian convent of S Vito, Ferrara, from 1636 to 1639...

Article

Suzanne G. Cusick

(b Ferrara, c1575; d after 1620). Italian composer, possibly identical with Raffaella Aleotti. Daughter of Ferrarese architect Giovanni Battista Aleotti, she first learned music by overhearing lessons intended for an older sister. Astonishing her parents and her sister’s teacher, Alessandro Milleville, by her harpsichord performance at about age six, she was taught directly by Milleville for at least two years before he recommended that she be educated at the musically renowned convent of S Vito, Ferrara. According to her father, Vittoria ‘chose to dedicate herself … to the service of God’ when she was 14. Sometime after that her father obtained madrigals from G.B. Guarini for her to set to music. He gave the results to Count del Zaffo, who had the music printed by Vincenti in Venice, as ...

Article

Ałepa  

Laurence Libin

Term for various instruments among the Choctaw people of Mississippi, USA. Meanings of the term were probably extended to cover non-native instruments by Rev. Cyrus Byington, a 19th-century missionary concerned with translating the Bible into Choctaw. Ałepa chito denotes a large drum or bass fiddle, ...

Article

Michael Walsh and Peter Mondelli

(b Baltimore, MD, Oct 4, 1949). American tenor. He was trained by Rilla Mervine and Raymond McGuire at Catholic University, Washington, DC (1969–72), by Oren Brown at the American Opera Center at the Juilliard School (1972–6), and by Marlene Malas. While at the American Opera Center he made his debut as Ernesto (in Donizetti’s ...

Article

(bGarfield, NJ, Aug 28, 1921; dNew York, Sept 1985). Americanpianist and leader. The first edition of this dictionary gave his birthdate as 22 August (as in Feather’s The Encyclopedia of Jazz), but his social security application gives 28 August. He played with Bunny Berigan (...

Article

Viorel Cosma and Ruxandra Arzoiu

(b Bucharest, 2/Aug 14, 1893; d Bucharest, Feb 18, 1959). Romanian composer, pianist, conductor, teacher, music critic, and director of music programmes. A leading figure of the first half of the 20th century, he laid the foundation of the Romanian school in music, concert life, and musical journalism. He studied with A. Castaldi, D. Dinicu, D.G. Kiriac, and E. Saegiu at the Bucharest Conservatory (...

Article

Richard Macnutt

Italian firm of music and general engravers and publishers, music and print sellers. The firm was active in Venice at the sign of the Beata Vergine della Pace on the Rialto from about 1770 to at least 1803. It was founded by the engravers Innocente Alessandri (...

Article

Ausilia Magaudda and Danilo Costantini

(b Milan, 29 June–6 Aug 1647; d Milan, Sept 2, 1712). Italian composer and tenor. His family was originally from Centonara, in the province of Novara, where the surname Chiapetta (Chiappetta, Chiappetti, Ciapeta, Ciapetta) was so common that ‘de Alessandri’ was used to identify the branch to which the composer belonged. It was because of these origins that his contemporary L.A. Cotta included him in a list of Novara musicians, describing him as ‘Giulio de Alessandri Chiapetta di Centonara in Riviera di S Giulio’. The documents which refer to him and his compositions use both surnames separately, and so ‘Giulio d’Alessandri’ and the ‘Canon Chiapetta’ have been identified as two different composers. He was ordained priest on ...

Article

Sven Hansell and Marita P. McClymonds

(b ?Rome, Nov 24, 1747; d Casinalbo, nr Modena, Aug 15, 1798). Italian composer. According to Manferrari, he was born at S Damaso, near Modena. He studied in Naples and had his first large work, the oratorio Il Tobia, performed in Rome in ...

Article

Paolo Gallarati

Italian city in Piedmont. It acquired its first theatre in 1729 when the hall of the palace of Marchese Filippo Guasco Gallarati di Solerio was inaugurated. The Teatro Civico opened in 1775 and in 1779 Cherubini’s first opera, Il Quinto Fabio, was performed there during the Alessandria fair. Restored in ...

Article

Richard Wigmore

( b Rome, Jan 25, 1960). Italian harpsichordist, organist and conductor . Largely self-taught, he conducted his first major concert, of Cavalli's Calisto, in Rome in 1985, with a group of singers that were to form the nucleus of a permanent ensemble, Concerto Italiano. The ensemble's first recording, of Monteverdi's fourth book of madrigals, was widely acclaimed for its passion and colour, winning a ...

Article

Anthony Hicks

Opera in three acts by George Frideric Handel to a libretto by Paolo Antonio Rolli based on Ortensio Mauro ’s La superbia d’Alessandro (1690, Hanover); London, King’s Theatre, 5 May 1726.

Alessandro was Handel’s ninth full-length opera for the Royal Academy of Music and the first of the group of five in which the leading female roles were designed for the rival sopranos Francesca Cuzzoni and Faustina Bordoni; they sang Lisaura and Roxana. The other singers included the castratos Senesino (Alexander) and Antonio Baldi (Taxiles), the tenor Luigi Antinori (Leonnatus), the contralto Anna Vincenza Dotti (Cleon) and the bass Giuseppe Boschi (Clitus). The opera was completed on ...

Article

Guido Salvetti and T. Herman Keahey

In 

See Besozzi family

Article

Guido Salvetti and T. Herman Keahey

In 

See Besozzi family

Article

Eleanor Selfridge-Field

In 

See Fedeli family