1,021-1,029 of 1,029 results  for:

Clear all

Article

Zamonga  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Zār  

Article

Gregory F. Barz

(b Dodoma" country="Tanzania, 1940; d Bagamoyo, Tanzania, Dec 30, 2003). Tanzanian musician . He grew up raising cattle in the Ugogo central region of Tanzania. He drew on the musical heritage of the Wagogo people, performing on traditional Wagogo instruments such as the ilimba lamellaphone, the zeze one-string chordophone and filimbi (flutes). His original and adapted compositions retell historical tales and praise political parties; for many years he was associated with the country’s national music and dance troupe. He was also a founding director of the Chuo cha Sanaa (College of Arts), a school established to teach and maintain aspects of traditional expressive culture located in Bagamoyo in coastal Tanzania. His recordings demonstrate his ability to perform the diphonic singing that is part of the Wagogo harmonic singing tradition. Zawose’s participation in WOMAD festivals around the world helped to promote traditional Wagogo music as well as his recording career. By the end of the 20th century he was considered one of Tanzania’s most important and influential traditional musicians....

Article

Zei  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

George Leotsakos

revised by Katerina Levidou

[George]

(b Cairo, Dec 17, 1947). Greek composer and musicologist. Born to Greek parents in Egypt, he settled in Athens in 1961, where he studied theory and piano at the Hellenic Conservatory (1975–7), and composition with Yannis Ioannidis (1977–81) as well as physics at the University of Athens. He then went to Paris, where he studied musicology and the aesthetics of music at the Sorbonne, Panthéon Paris 1, with Michel Guiomar and Daniel Charles, as well as ‘musique formelle’ with Xenakis. He also attended Boulez’s seminars at the Collège de France (1982–3) and spent time at IRCAM. He has taught musicology at the Athens University Faculty of Music Studies since 1995, where he is currently Permanent Assistant Professor.

Zervos is anything but a prolific composer. His work, late-romantic and expressionistic in style, reflects his musicological interest in the Second Viennese School. Meticulously conceived and elaborated, his atonal and 12-tone writing (with occasional tonal references, though), illustrated in such works as ...

Article

K.A. Gourlay

revised by Ferdinand J. de Hen

[zenze, nzenze, nsense, nzensi, dzendze, lunzenze, nzeze, luzenzu, dizeze, sese, lusese]

Stick zither widely distributed throughout the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The stick is a solid bar of wood 55 to 65 cm long and 2 to 3 cm wide throughout most of its length. Both ends of the bar terminate in a small knob to which the strings, of plant fibre, are attached. Three cylindrical ‘frets’ protrude on both sides of the stick. The U-shaped bridge is usually made of a feather quill. One or more drone strings pass beside the frets. A resonator made of two superposed calabash halves, or seldom a single half-calabash shell, is attached near one end; it is affixed to the underside of the bar by means of a small part-calabash collar and a cord. The zither produces four notes (open string and one note from each of the three frets) together with the drone(s). Accounts of the method of performance vary. Among the Shi the zither is held to the left so that the frets can be stopped with the fingers of the left hand while the thumb activates the drone string and the fingers of the right hand stroke the melody string. The half-calabash is usually placed on the player‘s chest and opened or closed in the same way as the resonator of a ...

Article

Thomas Turino

Country in southern Africa. It has an area of 390,759 km². The most vibrant forms of contemporary Zimbabwean music draw on indigenous traditions of the Shona, Ndebele and various minority linguistic groups; syncretic genres that emerged during the colonial period; music of Christian churches; and a variety of urban popular styles. European classical music has a relatively small presence, mainly among the white élite and the post-independence black élite. Chishona (Shona) is the mother tongue for approximately 71% and Sindebele (Ndebele) for 16% of a population of 12·39 million (2000 estimate). Many people also speak English, the former colonial language and now an official language. Europeans and Asians, the two largest foreign groups, comprise no more than 2% of the population. The majority of Zimbabweans live as agriculturalists/herders and farm labourers in rural areas, and 20% of the population live in Harare and Bulawayo, Zimbabwe’s two largest cities. For the black working class, there is much movement between urban townships and rural homesteads; both indigenous music styles and urban popular traditions are performed in the townships and countryside. There is a major collection of audio and video recordings of indigenous and urban popular music and dance in the National Archives of Zimbabwe in Harare....

Article

(b Panopolis [now Ahmīm], Egypt; fl Alexandria, 3rd or 4th century ce). Greco-Egyptian alchemist and philosopher. He composed allegories, and 28 books, in the form of letters, on alchemy; only fragments survive. A musical treatise has been attributed to him, but should be considered anonymous and of the 8th or 9th century, although it represents a compilation of the ideas of alchemists of the 3rd and 4th centuries, among whom Zosimus was the most prominent figure.

Two chapters on music occur in the writings of the Greek alchemists, one in the treatise attributed to Zosimus and the other in an anonymous work, wrongly assumed by Berthelot and Ruelle to be a commentary on it. According to Gombosi, these two chapters together form a single treatise and the attribution to Zosimus is incorrect. It survives complete in I-Vnm 299 and uses a rare technical term, stochos, which in two other manuscripts is replaced by ...

Article

Zupu  

Ferdinand J. de Hen