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Robert Stevenson

(b c1638; d Lisbon, Jan 19, 1709). Portuguese composer and harpist. On 6 January 1656 he professed as a Hieronymite monk at Belém Monastery, Lisbon, and he remained there until his death. His works, formerly in the monastery archive but now lost, included responsories for all important feasts, vesper psalms, masses, ...

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Jane M. Bowers

In 

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Randall H. Tollefsen

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Donna G. Cardamone

(b Corato; d Bari, after 1608). Italian composer and anthologist. Antiquis was associated with the basilica of S Nicola, Bari, for most of his career, first as cleric (from 1565), then as canon and choirmaster. From 1606 to 1608 he was chaplain and singing teacher of the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo in Naples. His two anthologies of 1574 (dedicated to the banker Daniello Centurione) contain 13 of his own villanellas and 31 by various musicians employed in Bari, among them Pomponio Nenna and Stefano Felis. His villanellas usually open homorhythmically and proceed in lightly imitative textures. Two books of madrigals by Antiquis are listed in the catalogue of the library of Federico Franzini, compiled in 1676 (Mischiati nos.XII:26–7); they do not survive. He also published a number of instrumental bicinia in anthologies.

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Iain Fenlon

(fl Mantua, 1606–49). Italian composer. He was a canon. His known works survive in two manuscripts (in I-Mc , Fondo S Barbara), the first containing 12 madrigals dated from Luzzara, near Mantua, in 1606, the second a setting in six sections of Rinuccini's Lamento d'Arianna which is ascribed to him on the cover in a contemporary hand. The title-page of the 1606 manuscript describes him as maestro di cappella of S Andrea, Mantua, and a copy of his will dated 22 March 1649 and kept with the manuscript implies that he was still at S Andrea at this date. The madrigals are all settings of Guarini, more specifically texts that had already been set by Monteverdi, then also working at Mantua, most of them in his fifth book of madrigals (1605). Reliance on Monteverdi's example is also evident in the Lamento, which thus places Antonelli even more firmly among those composers working at Mantua during the first decade of the 17th century – for example Amante Franzoni – who were heavily indebted to Monteverdi for textual, formal and sometimes stylistic models. At the same time the ...

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(b Arezzo, c1635; d Arezzo, May 15, 1688). Italian librettist. The name Apollonio Apolloni is spurious and refers to Giovanni Filippo (see Pirrotta). On the recommendation of Cardinal Giovanni Carlo de’ Medici, he entered the service of Archduke Ferdinand Karl of Austria about September 1653, perhaps at the instigation of Cesti. During his service at Innsbruck he wrote the librettos for Mars und Adonis, L’Argia and La Dori. He returned to Italy by 1659 and entered the service of Cardinal Flavio Chigi at Rome in May 1660, remaining in that post until his death; at some point he was given an abbotship, and in April 1668 entered the ‘family’ of the cardinal. Like Cesti, he belonged to the circle of Salvator Rosa and G.B. Ricciardi. He set to verse L’empio punito of Periodicals, , a friend of Chigi, for the Teatro Tordinona, Rome, in 1669; he apparently did the same for Acciaiuoli’s ...

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Robert Stevenson

(b Catalonia; d ?Seo de Urgel, in or after 1649). Spanish composer, active briefly in Italy. He studied at Alcalá de Henares and became a priest. In 1623 he accompanied to Rome the newly appointed Spanish ambassador to the Holy See, Ruy Gómez de Silva y Mendoza, Duke of Pastrana, and in 1624, when dedicating a volume of music to the duke, he described himself as his chaplain and musical director. From 1627 to 1634 he was mestre de canto at Seo de Urgel Cathedral. In 1649 he was recalled to this post for one year only. He published Libro segundo de tonos y villancicos, for one to four voices and guitar (Rome, 1624; one three-part piece and a four-part chacona ed. in MME, xxxii, 1970; one piece ed. in Cancionero musical de Lope de Vega, ii, Barcelona, 1987). It comprises 12 secular pieces, the concluding chacona being the first for voices by a Spanish composer to appear in print. The first book implied by this ‘second book’ is lost, but what are evidently six three-part pieces from it survive in the manuscript Cancionero Casanatense (in ...

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Gerard Béhague

(b Villafranca de los Barros, Extremadura, 1646; d La Plata [now Sucre], Bolivia, 1712). Composer of Spanish birth, active in South America. He went to Lima at an early age with his father, a civil official, and there attended the University of S Marcos during the late 1660s. He may have been a pupil of Torrejón y Velasco. After being involved in student disruption he was banished from Lima by the viceroy of Peru, the Count of Lemos. There is documentary evidence that he moved to Panamá, where he worked as choirmaster, and by 1672, when he returned to Lima, he had been ordained a priest. He was then appointed choirmaster of Lima Cathedral and held the post until 1676. He is not heard of again until 1680: from then until his death he was choirmaster of the cathedral at La Plata, Bolivia. He may have spent some time at Cuzco, Peru, since several of his works survive in the library of the S Antonio Abad Seminary there, but there is no evidence to support this suggestion....

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(fl 1662–1705). Portuguese organist and composer. He was a leading figure among secular and monastic organists in the archdiocese of Braga during the last quarter of the 18th century. He taught music at St Peter’s Seminary in Braga (1662–8) and in 1665 gave up the post of second organist at Braga Cathedral when he was granted a benefice at St Salvador in nearby Joane (now Famalicão), where he was active until at least 1704. He is known to have composed 13 keyboard works and another six can be attributed to him on stylistic grounds ( P-Pm 1607, BRp 964; ed in PM xi (1967), xxv (1974), and G. Doderer, Organa hispanica, ix, 1984). They bring together Aragonese and Italian, as well as Portuguese, elements, and demonstrate Araújo’s sensitivity to the character of the Portuguese-Galician organ of his time.

G. Doderer: Orgelbau und Orgelmusik im Portugal des 17. Jahrhunderts...

Article

H. Wiley Hitchcock

revised by Tim Carter

[‘La Romanina’]

(fl 1582–1620). Italian soprano, lutenist and dancer, wife of Antonio Archilei . Probably a pupil of her husband, whom she married most likely in 1582, she was a protégée of Emilio de' Cavalieri in Rome and was with him in the service of Cardinal Ferdinando de’ Medici before he became Grand Duke of Tuscany in 1587. She participated in the festivities for the wedding of Eleonora de' Medici and Vincenzo Gonzaga in 1584. When Cavalieri was made artistic superintendent at the Medici court in 1588, she went with her husband to Florence, where she became one of the most famous singers of her time. She apparently remained in the service of the Medici until her death.

She had a major part, as soprano soloist and lutenist, in the spectacular ‘intermedii et concerti’ for the comedy La pellegrina during the festivities for the marriage of Ferdinando de' Medici and Christine of Lorraine in ...

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Karl Leich

(b Venice; fl 1685–90). Italian librettist. He lived at Candia (now Iraklion), Crete. He wrote the librettos for Domenico Gabrielli's Il Clearco in Negroponte (1685) and G.A. Perti's La Rosaura (1689) and Brenno in Efeso (1690). The works were performed and printed in Venice. They treat historical subjects in a heroic-comic manner; each, by concealing the true identity of a principal character, arrives at a happy ending. They contain many da capo arias and exit arias. There are sometimes ballets between the acts....

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Robert Stevenson

(b Tafalla, Navarra, bap. Sept 22, 1638; d Toledo, Oct 11, 1706). Spanish composer. He was admitted to Toledo Cathedral as a choirboy on 17 September 1647, where he studied composition with Tomás Micieres. From 1658 to 1674 he was maestro de capilla of Pamplona Cathedral. He succeeded Juan de Padilla as maestro de capilla of Toledo Cathedral on 15 July 1674 and held the post for the 32 years up to his death – longer than any maestro there before or since. Between 1675 and 1702, 18 booklets of villancico texts were published at Toledo, and he was named as composer of the music for them. He joined the Cofradía de S Acacio (a musicians’ guild) on 23 June 1687 and on 24 July 1688 was responsible for commissioning a new organ for the guild. At Toledo Cathedral Ardanaz’s most notable musician was the harpist Diego Fernández de Huete, who arrived in ...

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Jerome Roche

(b c1580; d 1650). Italian composer. All that is known of his life is that he was organist at S Maria della Scala and S Fedele, Milan, and at the ducal court there. He is known to have composed only church music: two published volumes – of motets (1616) and falsobordone settings (1618) – are known about but have not survived; a third, Musica a più voci (Milan, 1628), which does survive, was, according to its title-page, connected with a particular dramatic pastoral presentation about the life of St Charles (possibly S Carlo Borromeo). Some motets, canzonas and a madrigal by Ardemanio appear in anthologies edited in Milan between 1608 and 1626 by Francesco Lucino (RISM 16056, 1608¹³, 1610¹, 16129, 1617², 16265). The comparative provincial obscurity of Ardemanio's musical activity may be due to the Spanish domination which somewhat isolated Milan from the mainstream developments which were centred on Venice....

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Gerhard Croll and Ernst Hintermaier

[Dardespin, Melchior]

(b c1643; d Munich, 1717). German composer and instrumentalist, ? of French birth. On 9 October 1669 he was employed as a cornettist at the Bavarian electoral court at Munich with an annual salary of 250 florins, increased on 27 October 1670 to 400 florins. In a decree of 2 September 1683 he received the title of Kammerdiener, and thenceforth he received 600 florins annually. In 1687 he was appointed director of the court orchestra and in 1690 electoral councillor; he held both positions until his death. In 1688 his salary increased by 300 florins, to which certain payments in kind were added, and it reached an annual total of 1073 florins in 1699; this was, however, reduced to 400 florins on 20 March 1700 as a result of Austria’s taking possession of Bavaria. His output, much of which is lost, consisted mainly of ballet music. Apart from a few isolated pieces and a ballet composed in ...

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(b Seville; fl 1628–33). Spanish writer. He was a member of the Trinitarian order in Seville. Between 1628 and 1633 he wrote several pseudo-historical works on local and religious topics as well as one pertaining to music: El psalterio de David: exortación, y virtudes de la música, y canto, para todo género de gentes, en particular para los eclesiásticos, y obligación que tienen de cantar, o rezar las divinas alabanzas con toda atención, y devoción (Jerez de la Frontera, 1632). This is a curious mixture of legend and history. The first part traces music from classical and biblical times up to and including the medieval period, the second treats of its various uses, not only religious but also military, social, educational and recreational. Arellano mingled ancient fable with contemporary anecdote and drew fanciful analogies between the realms of music and religion. His book is of particular interest as a compendium of the kind of material used in the traditional ‘praise of music’ (...

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Galliano Ciliberti

[Bonaventura Perugino ]

( b Cascia Spolentina, Perugia, 1620/21; d Rome, Feb 7, 1697). Italian soprano castrato . One of the most celebrated singers of his day, he was active in Rome and sang oratorios by Carissimi at the Collegio Germanico Ungarico between 27 March 1638 and 13 December 1646. On 15 August 1645 he entered the choir of the Cappella Sistina without competition, and was successively puntatore (1665), chamberlain (1660), maestro di cappella (1661), pensioner (1670) and dean (1694). He also performed cantatas, serenades and music dramas at the courts of the Roman aristocracy, and from June 1645 to December 1647 he was in the service of Prince Camillo Pamphili and his wife Olimpia Aldobrandini. In Rome he sang in solemn ceremonies at S Luigi dei Francesi (1645 and 1648), S Maria del Popolo (1657–8 and 1660...

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[Roggerio]

(b Castelnuovo di Garfagnana; fl 1612). Italian music editor and composer. He edited Responsoria Hebdomadae Sanctae, psalmi, Benedictus, et Miserere, una cum missa ac vesperis Sabbati Sancti, for eight voices and continuo (Venice, 1612²). It includes pieces by 20 composers, among them Croce and Viadana, and two are anonymous; Argilliano himself, with 11 pieces, is the best-represented composer....

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Albi Rosenthal

(b Bologna, 1668). Italian composer, brother of Attilio Ariosti . He was a member of the Order of servites at Bologna in which, under the name Odoardo, he was a music teacher. In his mother’s will of 4 February 1716 he was named ‘erede universale’ of her estate. He is known only by a collection of 44 dance-tunes, Modo facile di suonare il sistro nomato il timpano (Bologna, 1686, 2/1695/R), printed in a simple number notation; the ‘timpano’ or ‘sistro’ was a 12-bar glockenspiel played with wooden hammers. Brief instructions on how to play the instrument precede the tunes. The second and third, enlarged editions of the collection appeared as the work of Giuseppe Paradossi who, under the name of Troili, published another work for the instrument in 1705. While the musical significance of the publication is slight – the dance-tunes are of the common type well-known from contemporary manuscripts of guitar and violin tunes – it is one of a series of publications for the ‘sistro’ issued within two decades that point to the local popularity of the instrument around the turn of the century. (A. Rosenthal: ‘Two Unknown 17th-Century Music Editions by Bolognese Composers’, ...

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(b ?Arizu or Arizcun, Navarra, c1593; d Madrid, May 15, 1648). Spanish composer and singer. Between 1601 and 1604 he entered the choir school of the Spanish royal chapel and studied with its vicemaestro, the composer Gabriel Díaz Bessón. On 1 January 1614, after his voice had broken, he was appointed alto in the same capilla. On 1 March 1629 his salary was doubled, and on 28 February 1642 he was granted an annual allowance of 350 ducats, followed by another of 250 ducats on 20 March 1645 (though his salary was no longer doubled). In addition to his duties in the capilla Arizo was responsible for the musical instruction of the Bourbon Queen Elisabeth's ladies-in-waiting for at least ten years (1618–28), during which period he must have been in touch with the queen's chamber musician, Álvaro de los Ríos.

Arizo's two extant secular compositions are a four-part canción, ...

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Hanns Dennerlein

revised by Gerhard Weinzierl

(b Feldsberg, Lower Austria [now Valtice, Czech Republic], bap. April 23, 1621; d Bamberg, Jan 16, 1676). Austrian composer and organist, active in Germany. As early as 1640 he was organist of St Mark, Wolfsberg, formerly in the possession of the Franconian bishopric of Bamberg. After the end of the Thirty Years War, on 14 September 1649, he was appointed court organist at Bamberg through the influence of Prince-Bishop Melchior Otto Voit of Salzburg, who also began the Baroque restyling of the interior of Bamberg Cathedral and called on Arnold to provide a new repertory of masses, vespers and motets. The inclusion of a mass by Tobias Richter in Arnold’s op.2 and a Laudate pueri by G.G. Porro in his Psalmi vespertini indicates that he had contacts with Mainz and Munich, while the presence of 22 of his motets in the Düben Collection and a canon in J.G. Fabricius’s ...