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Scott Warfield

(b Mansfield, OH, Aug 14, 1924). American lyricist and writer. Adams began his career as a writer after earning degrees from Ohio State University and Columbia University. He worked initially as a journalist, while also writing lyrics for summer camp productions and night club revues. In ...

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Gary Carner

(b Highland Park, MI, Oct 8, 1930; d Brooklyn, NY, Sept 10, 1986). American jazz baritone saxophonist and composer. He grew up in Rochester where he took up tenor and baritone saxophones and clarinet, but settled on baritone after moving to Detroit in ...

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(b Rockville Centre, NY, 1952). American alto saxophonist, member of ROVA.

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Herman Klein and Harold Rosenthal

(b Cambridge, MA, Nov 28, 1872; d London, Feb 5, 1953). American soprano. She studied with Mathilde Marchesi and Bouhy in Paris and made her début at the Opéra in 1895 as Juliet; she seems to have studied both Juliet and Faust's Marguerite with Gounod himself, who greatly admired her brilliant yet flexible tone and fine technique. She sang at Covent Garden (...

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Maya Gibson

(b Houston, TX, Aug 27, 1961). American gospel music singer. Adams credits her earliest musical influences as James Cleveland, the Edwin Hawkins Singers, Nancy Wilson, and Stevie Wonder. She worked in a variety of jobs, including stints as a fashion model, television news anchor, and schoolteacher, before devoting herself to gospel music. She began her career as a lead singer touring with the Southeast Inspirational Choir, with whom she garnered the attention of composer/producer Thomas Whitfield who oversaw her debut solo album ...

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William Aide and Gordana Lazarevich

(b Toronto, March 28, 1906; d Victoria, May 6, 2002). Canadian composer, conductor and violinist. He studied the violin with Luigi von Kunits, Kathleen Parlow and Marcel Chailley, and was a member of the Toronto SO (1923–36) and the Toronto Trio (...

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Mike Hazeldine

(bNew Orleans, April 21, 1904; dNew Orleans, March 1942). Americandrummer. He first played cigar box in a spasm duo with Raymond Burke (1914). From 1923 to 1925 he was a member of Abbie Brunies’s Halfway House Orchestra, with which he made recordings in ...

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Barry Kernfeld

(b Tampa, FL, Sept 15, 1928; d Gary, IN, Aug 8, 1975). American jazz alto saxophonist and bandleader. He directed a high-school band in Fort Lauderdale and, after serving in army bands (1950–53), resumed teaching until 1955. He then moved to New York, intending to play with his brother, the cornettist Nat Adderley. Instead, a chance jam session led to his joining Oscar Pettiford’s band and signing a recording contract....

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Kenny Mathieson

(b Tampa, FL, Nov 25, 1931; d Lakeland, FL, Jan 2, 2000). American jazz cornetist, bandleader, and composer, brother of Cannonball Adderley. He took up trumpet as a child at the suggestion of his father, a cornetist, but switched to cornet in 1950...

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David Ades

(b London, Jan 13, 1904; d Chelsea, London, Nov 14, 1977). English composer. After a brief spell at the RCM (1925–6), he began his career contributing songs to revues and incidental music for stage plays. An early and productive collaboration began in ...

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Richard Bernas and Katie Buehner

(b New York, NY, July 24, 1925). American soprano. Her vocal and musical abilities won her scholarships to Westminster Choir College, Princeton (BM 1946), and the Berkshire Music Center, where she studied with Boris Goldovsky. She made her recital debut at Boston in ...

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Warren Vaché Sr

(bAnnapolis, MD, April 15, 1905; dNew Rochelle, NY, Dec 18, 1990). Americanacoustic guitarist. He began on violin and mandolin as a child. Having moved with his family to Washington, DC, in 1920, he worked in the area as a banjoist, at one point leading a group with Claude Hopkins. In New York he performed and recorded with Louis Armstrong (...

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Christopher Palmer

(b Chobham, March 16, 1920; d Bennington, VT, Dec 7, 1998). English composer. He studied at the RCM with Jacob (composition), Goossens (oboe) and Thurston (clarinet) and was Professor of Composition and Theory there from 1950 to 1956. His first major concert work, which shows a particular aptitude for wind writing, was the Woodwind Sextet (...

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Vera H. Flaig

(b Accra, Ghana, 1931). American master drummer of the Ga ethnic group, West Africa. Born in Accra, Ghana, Yacub is the eldest living member of the revered Addy family of drummers. His father, Jacob Kpani Addy, was a powerful jinni whose medicine name was Okonfo Akoto. Yacub has explained that he and his brothers began drumming out of necessity: “One day when they [his father’s drummers] were very late, my father lost patience with them, and told his senior sons to start the drumming.” While the brothers had never played the drums before, they were familiar with the complex rhythms that accompanied their father’s medicine. When the drummers finally arrived, they were shocked by how well the brothers could play. In ...

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Gregory F. Barz

(b Oshogbo, Nigeria, 1946). Nigerian performer. ‘King’ of Jùjú music and born into a royal Yoruba family, Adé first performed as a guitarist with Moses Olaiya and his Rhythm Dandies. In 1964 he shifted from the Highlife style to jùjú, and in 1966...

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Edward Blakeman

(b London, Jan 25, 1920). English flautist. He studied at the RCM with Robert Murchie, but was resistant to the English tradition of flute playing and has always considered himself largely self-taught. In 1938 he made his orchestral début in the St Matthew Passion...

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Arnold Whittall

(b London, March 1, 1971). English composer. After early success as a performer, winning second piano prize in the BBC Young Musician of the Year competition in 1989, he read music at Cambridge (1989–92). His rise to prominence as a composer was rapid, with commissions from the Hallé Orchestra, the London Sinfonietta, Almeida Opera and the City of Birmingham SO, combined with various residencies. Adès's connection with the Birmingham Contemporary Music Group led to his appointment as its Music Director, and as well as teaching composition at the RAM he became increasingly active as a conductor. In ...

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John Stanislawski

(b Springhill, LA, Jan 13, 1962). American country music singer. In line with country “hat acts” and neo-traditionalists such as Toby Keith and Tim McGraw, Trace Adkins has forged a working-class image and hard-driving sound by merging honky-tonk with Southern rock, gospel, and blues. His masculine bravado and allegiance to a blue-collar ethos has solidified his position as one of country’s top acts....

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Howard Schott

(b Kingston-on-Thames, May 30, 1938). English maker of fortepianos, clavichords, and harpsichords. He was educated at the Guildhall School of Music, London, where he specialized in keyboard instruments, studying the piano with Frank Laffitte, the harpsichord with Celia Bizony, and the organ with Harold Dexter. After some years as a music teacher, during which he also undertook some restorations of early keyboard instruments, he became curator of the Colt Clavier Collection, Bethersden, Kent (...

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William Y. Elias

(b Berlin, Jan 17, 1925). Israeli musicologist of German birth. He settled in Palestine in 1937, and studied music at the Paris Conservatoire (1949–53) and under Corbin at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes (diploma 1961). He then attended the musicology institute at the Sorbonne, where he studied with Chailley and in ...