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Colin Timms

(b Bologna, ?1660–70; d after 1719). Italian composer and instrumentalist. He was a pupil of G.P. Colonna and is described in his Cantate a voce sola da camera op.1 (Bologna, 1687; one ed. H. Riemann: Ausgewählte Kammer-Kantaten, Leipzig, [1911]) as a musician in the service of Marquis Guido Rangoni. Alveri also published Arie italiane amorose e lamentabili for solo voice and continuo (Antwerp, 1690), and two operas by him (Il re pastore, overo il Basilio in Arcadia and L'Isione) were performed at the court of Wolfenbüttel in 1691. The libretto of Il re pastore describes him as a ‘virtuoso’ of the duke there and as a member of the Accademia Filarmonica di Bologna. His name appears in a list of instrumentalists who were at Parma Cathedral on 10 August 1719. According to Schmitz, his cantatas are mostly fairly conservative in form although not without interesting features. Seven motets by him survive (...

Article

Jacques Aboucaya

(Bothelo )

(b Rio de Janeiro, April 28, 1950). Brazilian double bass player, pianist, and composer. From 1964 he played piano in the trio Camara, and later made a tour of France, where he settled in 1973; he then changed from piano to double bass and also studied composition at the Paris Conservatoire. He formed a duo with the pianist Jean-Pierre Mas (1978), appeared in Martial Solal’s trio, and played in Eric Le Lann’s quartet (1982). Between 1982 and 1985 he was heard with Jean-Louis Chautemps, Philip Catherine, Joachim Kühn, Michel Portal, and the Americans Charlie Mariano, Joe Henderson, and Lee Konitz. In 1985 he resumed playing piano and formed the Cesarius Alvim Connection, with Jean-François Jenny-Clark on double bass and André Ceccarelli on drums. After a period of voluntary retirement from 1992 to 1997 (though he continued to make recordings) Alvim resumed working: he composed a piece for symphony orchestra, ...

Article

Mervyn Cooke

(b Northampton, Nov 7, 1905; d Southwold, Sept 11, 1985). English composer, flautist, painter and writer. He entered the RAM at the age of 15, studying the flute with Daniel Wood and composition with John McEwen, and receiving scholarships in both disciplines. He returned to the RAM as composition professor in 1926 and in the following year his growing reputation as a flautist earned him a position with the LSO; also in 1927, Sir Henry Wood conducted Alwyn’s Five Preludes at a promenade concert. For the next decade Alwyn followed parallel careers as flautist and composer. In 1936 he embarked on a prolific series of film scores, first for documentaries and then for features (from 1941), notably in collaboration with Carol Reed; his work in this field was recognized in 1958 with his election to fellowship of the British Film Academy. In the 1940s and 50s he provided numerous incidental scores for BBC radio and television programmes. His experiences as a film composer quickly forced him to reassess what he termed a ‘woeful inadequacy’ of technique, and he felt compelled to disown all the music he had written before the Divertimento for flute (...

Article

Lowell Lindgren

[‘Pippo del Violoncello’]

(b Rome, c1665; d London, c1725). Italian cellist and composer. He was mistakenly named ‘Filippo Mattei’ in Mattheson’s Critica musica (January 1723). He played at Rome in concerts and religious functions sponsored by Cardinal Pamphili (1685–1708), the church of S Luigi dei Francesi (1686–1711), Cardinal Ottoboni (1690–99), the Accademia del Disegno di S Luca (1702–11), Prince Ruspoli (1708–11) and the church of S Giacomo degli Spagnoli (1707–13). He joined the musicians’ Accademia di Santo Cecilia on 25 September 1690, was the organist at S Spirito in 1694 and a trombonist in the Concerto del Campidoglio beginning in 1702. He is called ‘Roman’ in the libretto for his oratorio Aman delusus (1699) and that of La stella de’ magi (1702) identifies him as a ‘virtuoso’ of Cardinal Ottoboni. He served as ...

Article

Hans Joachim Marx

(b c1670; d after 1730). Italian composer. He is not to be confused with Giovanni Tedeschi, ‘detto Amadori’ (d c1780). Giuseppe Amadori was active in Rome between 1690 and 1709. In 1690 he was in the service of Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni as organist and harpsichordist. His oratorio Il martirio di S Adriano was performed in the Chiesa Nuova in 1702, and in 1707 and 1709 he was active in the Accademia del Disegno. An autograph Pange lingua for soprano and continuo and an aria with instrumental accompaniment are in the St Sulpitiuskerk, Diest (according to Eitner); two manuscript arias for soprano and continuo are in the Schlosskirche at Sondershausen and the Giuseppe Verdi Conservatory, Milan, and a cantata and other church music are in the Santini Collection ( D-MÜp ). Instrumental movements by him are included in two anthologies published in London, A Second Collection of Toccatas, Vollentarys and Fugues...

Article

Licia Mari

(b Venice, Aug 28, 1917; d Venice, Feb 20, 1995). Italian composer, pianist and teacher. He studied at the Venice Conservatory, where he took his diploma in the piano (1938, with Tagliapietra), in composition (1946, with Gabriele Bianchi, a Malipiero pupil), and choral and orchestral conducting (1947, with Sante Zanon, Sanzogno and Scherchen). He had a concert career as a pianist, and was a coach for the opera seasons at La Fenice, where he also conducted from 1973 to 1985. He was awarded international prizes for composition, and received honours in recognition of his commitment to teaching, which manifested itself in a series of pedagogical texts, many of which remain in manuscript. The influence of the generazione dell’ottanta can be seen in his Sonata for string orchestra (1947), in which rigorous, economical contrapuntal writing is supported by a solid formal awareness, Classical in nature; melodies cultivate a French kind of archaism, tinged with modality. These elements remained typical of Amendola’s work, along with a predilection for the piano, for which he wrote some technically complex works (e.g. Fifth Sonata, ...

Article

Juan Orrego-Salas

revised by Luis Merino

(b Santiago, Sept 2, 1911; d Santiago, Aug 2, 1954). Chilean composer and pianist. He studied with Allende for composition and Renard for the piano at the Santiago National Conservatory (1923–35), where he then held appointments as coach at the opera department (1935), assistant professor of the piano (1937), professor of analysis (1940), and director (1945). At the same time he taught at the Liceo Manuel de Salas in Santiago. He was secretary-general to the Instituto de Extensión Musical (from 1941), a founder-director of the Escuela Moderna de Música, Santiago (1940), and a member of various arts societies. In 1943 he went to the USA as a guest of the Institute of International Education and in 1953 he was in Europe for the performance of his Wind Sextet at the ISCM Festival. His early compositions show the influences of French music and Chilean folklore; from the late 1940s his work became more Expressionist and abstract....

Article

Robert Paul Kolt

(b Santiago, Chile, Jan 2, 1963). American composer, guitarist, ethnomusicologist, educator, and producer of Chilean birth. He immigrated to the United States as a child and studied guitar with Joseph Torello, Vincent Bredice, Lou Mowad, and George Aguiar. Amigo enrolled at Florida State University (1980) where he studied classical guitar with Bruce Holzman and William Carter and was active as a performer of popular music. In 1986, he moved to Los Angeles, earning a degree in political science from California State University, Northridge (BA 1995) and degrees in ethnomusicology (MA 1988, PhD 2003) from the University of Calfornia, Los Angeles. He studied in Los Angeles with Kenny Burrell, Gary Pratt, Harihar Rao, and wadada leo Smith. Amigo also performed with African, Arabic, funk, hard rock, free jazz, jazz, and reggae groups, and worked as a session guitarist for Hans Zimmer, Mark Mancina, Jay Rifkin, and Les Hooper, among others....

Article

Barbara A. Petersen

revised by Don C. Gillespie

(Werner)

(b Philadelphia, Nov 17, 1930). American composer, horn player and conductor. As a youth he played the piano, trumpet and horn, developing a strong interest in jazz as well as classical music. After a year at Oberlin Conservatory (1948), where he studied the horn, he attended George Washington University (BA in history, 1952). He was engaged as a horn player with the National SO, Washington, DC (1951–2), and then played with the Seventh Army SO in Europe; during his three years there he also toured as a soloist, performed with chamber ensembles, and in Paris took part in jazz sessions. He returned to the USA in 1955 and enrolled in the Manhattan School, where he studied with Mitropoulos, Giannini and Schuller; he was also a member of the Manhattan Woodwind Quintet. He was awarded honorary degrees from Moravian College, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania (1979...

Article

Jacques Aboucaya

(b Oran, Algeria, Oct 25, 1961). French pianist and composer. After taking lessons in classical piano he went to the USA to study at the Berklee College of Music (1981–3) and then at the Manhattan School of Music (MM composition). He appeared in the BMI Jazz Composition Workshop under the direction of Bob Brookmeyer (1984) and wrote for Mel Lewis’s orchestra. Based in New York from 1985, he worked in clubs with such musicians as Joshua Redman, Bobby Watson, Ernie Watts, and Sonny Fortune and toured Brazil with Gerry Mulligan’s quartet. In 1987 he formed a quartet with the saxophonist Tim Ries for a tour of Europe, and then in 1990 recorded his first album as a leader, with Gary Peacock and Bill Stewart as his sidemen. He composed for a Belgian chamber orchestra and for the Orchestre National de Jazz in Paris. Amsallem has continued to play with Ries, and in the course of working in both the USA and Europe he recorded with the saxophonist in a trio with Leon Parker (...

Article

Hans Åstrand

(b Stockholm, March 13, 1914; d Malmö, Jan 4, 1972). Swedish composer, pianist and conductor. During the period 1936–8 he studied composition in Stockholm, Copenhagen, Paris and London, and later in Salzburg and Vienna. He was a piano pupil of Olof Wibergh in Stockholm and studied conducting with Paumgartner, Walter and Weingartner at the Salzburg Mozarteum. In 1934 he made his début as a pianist and composer in Malmö with the later discarded Concertino. He was conductor of the Hippodromtheater, the Malmö operetta theatre (1939–42, 1949–50), and in 1946 founded a chamber orchestra which he directed until its activities ceased in 1950. Thereafter he lived as a freelance composer in Malmö, latterly spending much time in Cologne and Vienna; he sometimes appeared as a pianist or conductor, particularly with the Malmö Ars Nova. His electronic works were composed in his own studio, FEM.

Anderberg’s music of the 1930s and 40s showed French influence, but later he went through a 12-note serial period, stimulated by his profound analyses of Schoenberg’s piano music. In this way he integrated new techniques into an individual style, solidly craftsmanlike in the orchestral works and instrumentally brilliant in the chamber music. Many of his works were suggested by literature or by contemporary events, the latter particularly in later years: the piano concerto (...

Article

Rudolf A. Rasch

(b Oberweissbach, Thuringia, 1657; d Amsterdam, bur. March 14, 1714). Dutch composer, organist, violinist and carillonneur of German origin. He settled at Amsterdam and became organist at the Lutheran church in 1683, but was dismissed for bad behaviour and drunkenness in 1694; he was frequently asked for advice about organs and bells and was also a musician at the city theatre. He seems to have played an important part in zangspelen (Singspiele), along with such composers as Johannes Schenk and Servaas de Konink. These zangspelen, with texts by contemporary Dutch poets including Dirck Buysero and Cornelis Sweerts, are short, light, spoken plays interspersed with sung stanzas. Nothing is known about their performance and no complete scores have survived, though a number of items are extant in songbooks. These are in binary form and either French or Italian in style. Anders’s two books of instrumental music were possibly intended for use as incidental music in the theatre. His op.1 is rather in the French idiom; the other book is modelled on Italian examples....

Article

Anders Lönn

(b Kristiansand, Oct 10, 1845; d Stockholm, Sept 9, 1926). Swedish cellist and composer of Norwegian birth. He began his musical studies with the organist Rojahn. After playing the cello in the theatre orchestras of Trondheim (1864) and Oslo (1865), he moved to Sweden at the age of 21. There he studied composition with Johan Lindegren at the Swedish Royal Academy of Music and was a cellist in the Hovkapell from 1871 to 1905. From 1876 to 1911 he also taught the cello and the double bass at the conservatory, being appointed professor in 1912. He was elected to the Royal Academy of Music in 1882.

Like many of his contemporary Swedish composers, Andersen was strongly influenced by the Austro-German tradition. His works, mostly unpublished, include five symphonies, one of which calls for 14 cello and three double bass parts, a string quartet, a sonata for cello and piano (Stockholm, ...

Article

Barbara A. Petersen

revised by Judith Rosen

(b Kalispell, MT, March 21, 1928). American composer, flautist and orchestrator. At the University of Washington she studied the flute (BA 1949) and composition (MA 1951). She did postgraduate work at the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center and at Princeton University, and privately studied composition with Boulanger and Milhaud and the flute with Wummer and Rampal. She worked as a flautist, playing with the Totenberg Instrumental Ensemble (1951–8) and as principal of the Boston Pops (1958), and was an orchestrator at NBC (1960–66) and Lincoln Center Theatre (1966). In 1968 she designed and became the director of the first electronic music studio within CUNY at Hunter College, where she taught composition and theory (1966–89). Among her many awards are two Fulbright scholarships to Paris (1958–60), residencies at MacDowell Colony (1957–73) and Yaddo (...

Article

Eldonna L. May

(b Zanesville, OH, May 12, 1915; d Washington, DC, Nov 24, 2003). American educator, pianist, composer, and arts administrator. The grandson of former slaves, Anderson was a musical prodigy, playing piano and organ professionally while in elementary school. He attended Oberlin College where he studied composition with Herbert Elwell, followed by studies at the Berkshire Music Center with paul Hindemith and at the Cleveland Institute of Music. Anderson received the equivalent of a doctoral degree in 1952 as a fellow of the American Guild of Organists (AAGO and FAGO), and in the 1970s he was awarded four honorary doctorates.

Early in his professional career he taught at the Kentucky State College for Negroes (1939–42), became chairman of the Wilberforce University music department, and directed music programs at Karamu House, a neighborhood arts center for underprivileged residents of the east side of Cleveland, Ohio. He also began a 30-year career as a concert pianist, performing throughout the United States and Europe. Anderson’s appointment as chair of the music department at Antioch College in ...

Article

(b Stockholm, Aug 22, 1851; d Stockholm, May 20, 1918). Swedish pianist, teacher and composer. At the Swedish Royal Academy of Music (1867–74) he studied the piano first with Johan van Boom and then with Ludvig Norman, harmony with Otto Winge, the organ with Gustaf Mankell and composition with Berens. After further piano study with Hilda Thegerström (1874–6), he went to Berlin, where he became a pupil of Clara Schumann and Heinrich Barth and also studied composition at the Hochschule für Musik with R. Wüerst and Friedrich Kiel. During this period he frequently deputized as a teacher for Barth, both at the Hochschule and privately. He returned to Stockholm in 1884 and two years later founded a piano school, where at first he was the only teacher of the instrument, with Sjögren as teacher of harmony. The school gradually developed a more general curriculum, including courses in other instruments and in singing, and became the country’s outstanding private music school. Noted Swedish musicians who studied at the school (Anderssons Musikskola) include Stenhammar, Astrid Berwald, Wiklund, Fryklöf and Gustaf Heintze. Andersson was appointed professor of piano at the Stockholm Conservatory in ...

Article

George J., Jr. Grella

(b Palo Alto, CA, Oct 10, 1985). American composer and pianist. After studying composition during high school at Juilliard’s Pre-College division, he attended Yale, where he studied composition with martin Bresnick, ingram d. Marshall, Aaron Jay Kernis, and Chris Theofanidis (BA 2007, MM 2009). He studied piano for many years with Eleanor Marshall, then later with Frederic Chiu. Andres had a notable debut with his CD, The Shy and the Mighty, released on Nonesuch in 2010. It is a recording of ten interrelated pieces, by Andres, for two pianos, played by the composer and David Kaplan. The piece is both a survey of the ideas of the piano literature from the Baroque era to 20th-century minimalism, and also a personal and distinctive synthesis of the legacy of that history. Andres incorporates the processes of minimalism as well as the elegant, song-form harmonic structure and motion of Schubert. He writes skillfully for the two pianos, each sounding distinctively in the overall texture. Sections of the piece have been performed by Brad Mehldau at Zankel Hall (...

Article

Lawrence Schenbeck

(b Detroit, MI, Sept 24, 1951). American composer, theorist, and jazz saxophonist. He attended public schools in Detroit, including Cass Technical High School, where he studied jazz and led his own band, the Seven Sounds. He continued his education at the University of Michigan (BMEd 1973, MA 1974) and at Yale University (MDiv 1977, PhD music theory 1993). Andrews was ordained as a minister in 1978, serving as Yale University campus chaplain and as faculty member in the Music Department and Department of African American Studies for more than a decade. During that period he met Lloyd Richards, director of the Yale Repertory Theatre, and playwright August Wilson. Andrews became resident music director (1979–86) for the company and contributed original music scores to a number of Wilson’s plays, including Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, Joe Turner’s Come and Gone, Fences, The Piano Lesson, and Seven Guitars...

Article

Viorel Cosma

revised by Ruxandra Arzoiu

(b Bucharest, Dec 22, 1894/Jan 5, 1895; d Bucharest, Feb 4, 1974). Romanian composer, pianist, teacher, and critic. An erudite personality of Romanian music, he contributed to the formation of a Romanian school of composition during the inter-war years. At the Bucharest Conservatory (1906–13) he studied with Kiriac-Georgescu, Castaldi, Klenck, and Dunicu. In 1919 he graduated law school in Bucharest and then took the PhD in 1922 in Paris. During his stay in France, he participated in the courses of composition of Vincent d’Indy and Gabriel Faure. In 1920, he founded the Society of Romanian composers with other important musicians. At the Bucharest Conservatory (now the National University of Music Bucharest) he taught chamber music (1926–48) and composition (1948–59). His students include Stefan Niculescu, Dumitru Capoianu, and Aurel Stroe. He was not only a partner at the chamber concerts of George Enescu, but also promoted together with Enescu the new Romanian and French chamber music. He wrote for numerous publications on subjects ranging from music aesthetics to jazz and folk music, for instance, ‘George Enescu the Way I Met Him’ in ...

Article

Rudolf Klein

(b Vienna, May 16, 1927). Austrian conductor, viola player and composer. From 1941 to 1946 he studied theory, the piano, violin and organ at the Vienna Music Academy. After playing the viola in the Vienna SO and winning a medal at the Geneva Music Competition in 1948, he was engaged by the Zürich Tonhalle Orchestra, and then by the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande (1949–52). From 1953 to 1956 he was principal viola player in the Vienna SO. He also won first prize for an organ composition in the competition in Haarlem in 1954.

Angerer’s subsequent career as a conductor has extended from the post of director and chief conductor of the Vienna Chamber Orchestra (1956–63), and numerous tours as guest conductor, to an engagement as composer and conductor of the Vienna Burgtheater (1960–64). In this capacity he wrote and performed music for various plays. He was principal conductor of the opera house of Bonn (...