101-120 of 160 results  for:

  • Instrumentalist x
Clear all

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, July 5, 1949). Japanese pianist and leader. He took piano lessons from the ages of five to 19, began to play jazz and Brazilian music, and turned professional in 1974 after graduating from Tokyo Institute of Technology. In 1979 he made his first recording as a leader, with a quartet featuring Frank Wess. Later he led a quintet (...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Aug 11, 1966). Japanese drummer and leader. He started playing drums at the age of three, when he was given a miniature set as a birthday gift. While living in Kenya from ages five to eight he worked professionally as a musician at the Nairobi National Theater for a month. After returning to Japan he studied drums privately (1975–8). He was featured on various radio and TV programs as a child prodigy and gave his first recital in Tokyo when he was 11; that same year he recorded his first album as a leader. In 1978 he accompanied Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Stitt at the Monterey Jazz Festival in Japan. He then worked with Toshiyuki Honda (1978–84), Mikio Masuda (1984–7), and Fumio Karashima (1987–91). Having graduated from Hosei University in 1987, he moved in 1991 to New York, where he later performed with Kenny Garrett, Don Friedman, and Ron McClure, among many others. Okudaira became a member of Carlos Garnett’s quartet in ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Kyoto, Japan, April 16, 1967). Japanese pianist and leader. She learned piano from the age of four. While attending the Berklee College of Music (from 1986) she played in jam sessions with Delfeayo Marsalis, Roy Hargrove, Geoff Keezer, and others, and she made her professional début with Slide Hampton in France (1988). After graduating in 1989 and moving to New York she became the pianist in Jesse Davis’s quintet, which served as the house band at Augie’s. She toured the USA, Japan, and Europe with Gary Thomas (1990), Europe and the USA with Joe Henderson, and the USA and Japan with Kenny Garrett (1991), and during the same period she worked with Terence Blanchard, Greg Osby, the Mingus Big Band, and Mingus Dynasty. On moving back to Japan in 1992 Onishi joined Shigeharu Mukai’s quintet and formed her own trio, whose first recordings were highly successful; Rodney Whitaker and Billy Higgins were the sidemen on her second album. In ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Akita, Japan, Sept 28, 1966). Japanese drummer and leader. He took up drums at the age of ten and in 1986 enrolled at the Berklee College of Music. In 1990 he returned to Japan to start a professional career, and his participation that same year in Roy Hargrove’s quartet with Yutaka Shiina led to the formation, in 1991, of the quintet Jazz Networks (with the addition of Antonio Hart); the group made several successful recordings. In 1992, with Tomonao Hara, Osaka formed a quintet. He teaches part-time at Senzoku Junior College.

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Osaka, Japan, Oct 24, 1960). Japanese double bass player and leader. He received piano lessons from the age of three, took up guitar at age 13 and electric bass guitar the following year, and changed to double bass when he was 19. Later he performed with Sadao Watanabe, Motohiko Hino, the pianist and keyboard player Makoto Kuriya, and the guitarist Toshiki Nunokawa, with whom he recorded the album ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

[Keiji ]

(b Tokyo, April 6, 1937). Japanese drummer. Self-taught, he took up drums while working as an assistant for bands, made his professional début with Sadao Watanabe’s Cozy Quartet in the late 1950s, and rose to popularity as a member of Hidehiko Matsumoto’s quartet (1961–4). In 1965 he formed a successful trio featuring the pianist Hideo Ichikawa and recorded with Roy Haynes as guest drummer; in 1970 he toured Japan in the group Four Drums, consisting of Haynes, Jack DeJohnette, and Mel Lewis. He led a quintet from 1971 and various units under the name of Maracaibo from the late 1970s, and he toured Japan with many visiting musicians, including Elvin Jones, Phil Woods, Reggie Workman, Kenny Kirkland, John Scofield, Richard Beirach, Miroslav Vitous, and Nana Vasconcelos. From the late 1980s he led the group We Three (not to be confused with another Japanese group, We 3), with Hiroyuki Takimoto on piano and Hideaki Kanazawa on double bass. Otsuka has been one of the busiest modern-jazz musicians in Japan, and his group is known for providing a stepping stone for developing young musicians....

Article

Robert L. Doerschuk

revised by Mark Gilbert and Barry Kernfeld

(b Kōbe, Japan, March 25, 1961). Japanese pianist. The son of a jazz pianist and organist, he was a reluctant student of classical piano as a child. At first, under the influence of Jimmy Smith, he would only play jazz on the Hammond organ, but after attending a concert by Oscar Peterson at the age of 12 he took up jazz piano and transcribed some of Peterson’s solos. From 1980 he attended the Berklee College of Music, where he quickly assimilated new ideas through his work with Gary Burton and from the playing of such musicians as Chick Corea. Ozone recorded albums in a duo with Phil Wilson (1982), a faculty member at Berklee, and in a quartet led by Bobby Shew. More significantly, after graduating he joined Burton’s band and in 1983 made a world tour; he also began to give performances as an unaccompanied soloist. In ...

Article

Robert Pernet

[Paquet, Pierre ]

(b Brussels, Aug 8, 1904; d Westende, Belgium, Dec 26, 1965). Belgian trumpeter, composer, and arranger. With his family he moved at an early age to China, where he first studied music. He returned in 1912 to Brussels, and despite an accident that left him without the use of one arm took up trumpet in 1924. In the following years he was a member of the Varsity Ramblers and, with David Bee, of the group Bistrouille ADO, as a member of which he wrote such compositions as Alabama Mamma, The Blue Duke, and Dixie Melody; the last named was recorded by the band in 1930 (Col. DF319). After Bee’s departure from the group early in 1927 Packay became its leader and devoted greater attention to composition. With several members of Bistrouille ADO he later formed a band called Packay’s Swing Academy, which accompanied Coleman Hawkins in Brussels; he also wrote arrangements for the American bandleader Billy Arnold. Packay recorded his piece ...

Article

Val Wilmer

[Theresa; Naa-koshie]

(b Bodmin, England, Nov 8, 1940). English singer, pianist, and percussionist, daughter of Cab Kaye. She began singing professionally in 1962 with the Latin jazz band led by the Filipino pianist and vibraphonist Ido Martin, then sang with the pianists Colin Purbrook, Leon Cohen, and Brian Lemon (with John Stevens on drums). Following a nightclub residency with the Guyanese singer and percussionist Frank Holder she joined a Trinidadian band, the Merrymakers, in Germany. She continued to alternate nightclub work with jazz, playing congas and singing. In Berlin she worked with Carmell Jones, Dave Pike, and Leo Wright. Quaye traveled to Ghana, and in Paris she played with the Cameroonian saxophonist Manu Dibango. At this point she reclaimed her Ga name Naa-koshie, which she used professionally for some years. In New York in the early 1970s she played congas for Syvilla Forte’s dance troupe, sang with Harold Mabern, Jiunie Booth, Richard Davis, and Art “Shaki” Lewis, took part in jam sessions with Billy Higgins and others, and recorded on congas with Archie Shepp (...

Article

Guillermo I. Olliver and Rainer E. Lotz

[Mike; Muhiddin, Ahmed]

(b Constantinople [now Istanbul], Sept 24, 1905). Argentine bandleader, banjoist, guitarist, and singer of Turkish birth. While attending the University of Michigan he played banjo under the name Ahmed Muhiddin in student bands (1924–31) and in an orchestra led by Jean Goldkette (1927). He worked as a newspaper correspondent in Uruguay and at the same time played in and around Montevideo in a trio led by the pianist Luis Rolero, with which he later moved to Buenos Aires; after this group disbanded in 1934 he joined the Dixie Pals, led by the violinist Paul Wyer, with which he recorded several tracks for Victor, including a version of his own composition Africa (1934, 37642). From 1936 to the early 1940s he played with the pianist Rene Cospito and his Orquesta Argentina de Jazz, with the drummer Mario D’Alo’s Rhythm Kings, and in a group modeled after the Quintette du Hot Club de France that included Hernán Oliva (violin), Dave Washington (second guitar), and Louis Vola (double bass). In the late 1930s, by which time he had taken the name Ahmed Ratip, he studied harmony with the bandleader Russ Goudy. Early in ...

Article

Barry Kernfeld

[Choudhury, Amerendra Roy]

(b East Pakistan [now Bangladesh], c1945). Pakistani tablā player. He received some lessons from his uncle but was mainly self-taught. Late in 1968 he moved to the USA to undertake graduate work in statistics at New York University and began playing jazz-rock in clubs in New York, often with John McLaughlin; he recorded two tracks on the guitarist’s album My Goal’s Beyond (1970, Douglas 9). Having gained a master’s degree he began doctoral work, but he abandoned this in order to tour and record with Miles Davis (1972–c1974); he also recorded with Pharoah Sanders (1972) and Lonnie Liston Smith (1973). Between 1973 and 1976 Roy was a member of Dave Liebman’s group Lookout Farm, with which he toured Europe, India, and Japan and made a number of recordings (including the album Sweet Hands, 1975, A&M Hor. 702); during the same period he performed and recorded with Frank Tusa (...

Article

Sergey Belichenko

(Emirovich )

(b Baku, Azerbaijan SSR [now Azerbaijan], June 6, 1946). Azerbaijani pianist. He first played jazz at the age of 12 and later completed studies in piano and composition at both the Azerbaijan Conservatory and, in 1969, the Baku Conservatory. While still a teenager he organized a student “symphojazz” group and led a trio, and in 1964 he was invited by the tenor saxophonist Vladimir Sermakashev to play in the KM Quartet at the jazz club Youth. In Moscow he worked with such musicians as Aleksey Zubov, Gennady Golstain, and Konstantin Nosov and played at the jazz clubs Sinyay Pittsa (Bluebird) and Pechora. He was a member of the band Blue Screen (1969–71), Oleg Lundstrem’s orchestra (1973–7), the Azerbaijan State Variety-Symphonic Orchestra (1977–9), and Georgy Garanian’s ensemble Melody (1979–85), to which he contributed compositions and arrangements; he also formed the Quintet of the Soloists of Melody (including Zubov), which recorded his first album as a leader. In ...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama and Barry Kernfeld

(b Hiroshima, Japan, Feb 21, 1945). Japanese alto saxophonist and leader. He played clarinet in a high school brass band and alto saxophone in a college band. After moving to Tokyo (1969) he performed and recorded in Japan and Europe as a member of Yosuke Yamashita’s trio (1972–9). With his own group he toured Germany and France and appeared at the Newport Jazz Festival in New York (1979). From 1980 he led a trio, though he also organized various orchestras. In 1986 he recorded in a duo with Peter Kowald and in a wild improvised dialogue with Peter Brötzmann as a guest soloist with the group Last Exit (Brötzmann, Sonny Sharrock, Bill Laswell, and Ronald Shannon Jackson). Later he participated in projects with Laswell, Jackson, the Senegalese percussionist Ayib Dieng, the Gambian kora (plucked harp-lute) player Foday Musa Suso, and other musicians from different traditions. Sakata’s performances display considerable virtuosity and an engaging sense of humor....

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

(b Hakodate, Japan, March 14, 1952). Japanese guitarist. Having taught himself guitar he performed in Sapporo with Sadao Watanabe, who encouraged him to embark on a professional career in Tokyo; however, within a year he had returned to Hakodate. In 1977 he moved to Chicago, and two years later he performed at the first Chicago Jazz Festival. Later he recorded in duos with Harvie Swartz (1989) and Ron Carter (1991) and in a trio with Swartz and Victor Lewis (1989) and toured Japan leading a quintet that consisted of Randy Brecker, Don Friedman, Swartz, and Jimmy Cobb (1991).

G. Lees and J. Reeves: Jazz Lives: 100 Portraits in Jazz...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Oct 6, 1941). Japanese pianist, composer, arranger, and leader. He studied violin and piano from the age of five, and while still in high school was a member of George Kawaguchi’s group Big Four (known during his membership as Big Four Plus One). After graduating from Keio University in Tokyo he studied at the Berklee School of Music (1966–8). He then returned to Tokyo, formed a trio, and recorded his first album, Palladium (1969), which was critically acclaimed. Also in Tokyo he recorded with Charles Mingus and Helen Merrill (1971), and in Germany he recorded as a leader (1971) and with Attila Zoller (1971), Karl Berger (1971), and Albert Mangelsdorff (1973). Sato’s best-known compositions include Samardhi, Fairy Rings, Fall Out (1972), Yamataifu (1972, played by Toshiyuki Miyama’s New Herd), ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Feb 10, 1930; d August 28, 2006). Japanese guitarist and leader. He took up guitar at the age of 12, spent much time listening to jazz on the radio, and then began playing at military bases, where, in 1957, he took lessons from a former member of Chico Hamilton’s band. A pioneer of modern jazz guitar in Japan, he formed the group Double Beats in 1954 and from 1966 led a quintet; Shotaro Moriyasu, Norio Maeda, Akitoshi Igarashi, and Motohiko Hino were among his sidemen at various times. His recordings as a leader include the albums Shungo Sawada vs Sadanori Nakamure (1975, Tei. GM5003) and Shungo (1983, Denon YX7342). Sawada performed in Japan with Benny Goodman, Stan Getz, Helen Merrill, Oscar Peterson’s trio, Dizzy Gillespie, Thad Jones, and Sonny Stitt, among others, and from 1981 he was a member of Maeda’s Wind Breakers. He established a recording company and label, Elec (...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Amagasaki, Japan, Nov 26, 1953). Japanese pianist. He learned piano from the age of six. Inspired to play jazz at the age of 13 when he watched the film The Glenn Miller Story, he formed an amateur jazz band in high school, studied composition at Kunitachi College of Music in Tokyo, and embarked on a professional career in ...

Article

Frank Büchmann-Møller

(b Bangkok, Feb 6, 1926; d Copenhagen Jan 2, 1981). Danish drummer. His father owned rubber plantations in Siam and Malaysia, and he spent his early childhood in both countries. He moved to Denmark in 1934 and played professionally with the Harlem Kiddies from 1947 to 1953. After performing in Sweden with Arne Domnérus (1953–5) he returned to Denmark to work as a freelance, and played regularly with Stan Getz during the saxophonist’s stay in Scandinavia (1958–61). He then served as the house drummer at the Montmartre, Copenhagen (1962–3), and as a member of the Radiojazzgruppen (i) (1961–5) and the Radioens Big Band (1964–9). Thereafter he was inactive on account of ill-health. Schiöpffe was regarded as one of the best European drummers of his era – he was chosen to be a member of the European All Stars during the International Jazz Festival in Berlin in ...

Article

Tony Gould

[Robert Alexander ]

(b ’Akko, Palestine [now in Israel], Aug 24, 1943). Australian pianist. As a small child he lived in England, where he first studied piano. His family moved to Melbourne, Australia, in 1950 and during the 1960s he gained experience with various ensembles there. He performed and recorded with Ted Vining (from 1969), Alan Lee (1972–3), and Brian Brown (from 1974), and accompanied such visiting Americans as Dizzy Gillespie, David Baker, Phil Woods, Jimmy Witherspoon, Milt Jackson, and Lee Konitz; he toured Scandinavia with Brown in 1978. In 1984 he formed the group Blues on the Boil, which was influenced by the blues styles of Chicago and the Mississippi Delta; he also played with Onaje, a group led by Allan Browne. He is a member of the faculty of the Victorian College of the Arts in Melbourne, where he teaches in the improvisation department....

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Dec 23, 1954). Japanese percussionist. He grew up in a family of traditional Japanese musicians and learned taiko (traditional Japanese drums) from the age of three; he made his début in kabuki when he was ten and started on drums and percussion when he was 13. Having majored in traditional Japanese percussion, he graduated from the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music, though he had already begun to work professionally in other genres at the age of 19. In 1978 he joined a popular jazz-fusion group, The Square. Later he accompanied the popular singer and songwriter Akiko Yano and worked with Akira Sakata, the traditional percussion group Kodo (1981), and the Asian Fantasy Orchestra (1992). Senba recorded with Material, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Ronald Shannon Jackson, and Kazumi Watanabe’s Mobo Band, and from 1982 he led various groups of his own. While maintaining a busy studio career he has been active in traditional Japanese music, jazz, and pop. In ...