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Article

Thomas F. Heck

(Vassilievich )

(b Kharkiv, Ukraine, May 13, 1898; d Rosendale, NY, Nov 1986). American guitarist and editor of Ukrainian birth. His study of art at the Imperial Kharkiv Art School was halted by the Russian Revolution. He immigrated to the United States in 1922, and became successful in New York as a commercial artist. The classical guitar, to which Andrés Segovia first drew his attention in New York on a tour in 1928, captured Bobri’s deep interest. He became president of the Society of the Classic Guitar in 1936 and editor of its publication The Guitar Review (Guitar Review from 1961) in 1946. His own guitar pieces, editions of guitar music, pedagogical publications, and contributions to Guitar Review for over 35 years attest to his devotion to the instrument. He wrote The Segovia Technique (New York, 1972) and compiled A Musical Voyage with 2 Guitars (New York ...

Article

Józef Powroźniak

revised by Klaus-Peter Koch

(b Kraków, May 12, 1805; d Dresden, Nov 2, 1881). Polish guitarist, composer and publisher. He studied in Vienna with Mauro Giuliani (1816–19). After a short career as a soloist he was made, in 1829, secretary of the senate of the Kraków Republic. When news of the 1830 Warsaw uprising reached him, he volunteered for the Polish Army and served as aide-de-camp to Bem; he was awarded the Virtuti Militari order. On the collapse of the uprising in 1831 he emigrated to Germany. In Leipzig he performed at the Gewandhaus with Karol Lipiński, Clara Wieck and others. Liszt called him ‘Chopin sur la guitare’. He wrote about 40 pieces for his instrument, mostly fantasies, marches, polonaises and waltzes, published by Hofmeister or Breitkopf & Härtel. In addition, he revised Carulli's tutor and published his own with Sennewald in Warsaw. He gained particular importance between 1833 and ...

Article

(b Barum, Brunswick, Jan 12, 1730; d Weimar, Dec 13, 1793).German translator, publisher, performer and composer. His principal instrument was the bassoon, and in 1749 at Helmstedt he played the cello in J.C. Stockhausen’s collegium musicum. He moved to Celle in 1752 as an oboist and composer, and at the same time developed a strong interest in foreign languages and literature. In 1757 he settled in Hamburg as a music teacher and writer, and later became a publisher and dealer in books and music. During this period he edited the Hamburgischer unpartheyischer Correspondent (1762–3), completed and published Lessing’s translation of Noverre’s Lettres sur la dance (1769) and published his own translation (with C.D. Ebeling, 1772) of Burney’s The Present State of Music in France and Italy (1773). He also translated oratorios by Metastasio, librettos to comic operas by Piccinni and Guglielmi, and novels by Fielding, Sterne, Goldsmith and others. His published compositions include two collections of songs under the title ...

Article

Otto Riemer

revised by Clytus Gottwald

(b Lichtenberg, Vogtland, 1576; d Gross Osterhausen, Thuringia, 1636). German music editor, composer and clergyman. He received his musical and academic education in the electoral choir school at Dresden, at Leipzig and at Schulpforta, where he was greatly influenced by Sethus Calvisius. In 1600 he became Kantor at Schulpforta and in 1603 pastor at nearby Rehausen and in 1608 at Gross Osterhausen, near Querfurt, where he remained until his death.

As a composer Bodenschatz remained within the bounds of contemporary practice. His masterly Magnificat and especially his 90 bicinia are nevertheless of considerable artistic merit and effectively combine an early Baroque inclination towards word-painting with supple vocal lines. His primary importance, however, lies in his Florilegium Portense, a motet anthology in two parts modelled on the unpublished anthologies of Calvisius. Intended to illustrate the practice of choral music at Schulpforta, it provides a valuable cross-section of German and Italian motet composition about ...

Article

Susan Bain

(b Leuven, c1531; d Leuven, Feb 17, 1616). Flemish bookseller and printer. He worked initially at Leuven (1562–72) but by 1574 was settled in Douai, where he had moved to avoid political turmoil; in both towns his sign was the Bible d’Or. At Leuven he printed ‘with the authority of the University’ and at Douai he became University Printer, receiving in 1590 the freehold of his premises. Bogard returned to Leuven in 1586 to re-open the office there, leaving his son Jean (b Leuven, 29 March 1561; d Douai, ?July 1627) to manage the Douai office in his absence. Publication continued at Leuven until 1598; thereafter the firm operated only at Douai. In 1607 Bogard’s wife died, and shortly afterwards he retired to Leuven, marrying again in 1610 and spending his final years there. His son Jean succeeded him as head of the firm in ...

Article

Raymond A. Barr

(b Prague, c1748; d Berlin, July 4, 1811). German songbook compiler of Bohemian birth. After beginning his career as an actor and tenor in Hamburg and Breslau, he went to Berlin in 1779 to join Döbbelin’s theatrical troupe at the Theater am Gendarmenmarkt. Later he spent some time at the Thabor Theatre in Frankfurt, but returned to Berlin in 1789 to become a member of the Berlin National Theatre. In 1793, in collaboration with his countryman Joseph Ambrosch, he published a popular two-volume collection of Masonic lieder entitled Freymaurer-Lieder mit Melodien; a revised edition with a new third volume compiled by Böheim alone appeared in 1795. Included in these volumes were works by Mozart (including his Zauberflöte aria ‘In diesen heil'gen Hallen’), J.G. Nägeli, André and Bernhard Weber. In 1798–9 Böheim published his most important collection of Masonic music, Auswahl von Maurer-Gesängen mit Melodien der vorzüglichsten Componisten...

Article

José López-Calo

(b Verona, March 14, 1875; d Barcelona, Sept 27, 1948). Italian music publisher of French origin. He began as a music printing apprentice with Ricordi, Milan, then went as a printer to Marcello Capra of Turin. In 1904 he became a printer for Vidal Llimona y Boceta of Barcelona, whose printing works he took over in 1906. He went straight into the publishing business, founding, in partnership with others, the firm Iberia Musical in Barcelona; in 1928 he absorbed its publishing assets with those of other publishing firms to form the Editorial Boileau. He was active for several decades, publishing the standard repertory and much other music; later the firm devoted itself almost exclusively to printing music for other firms. His most popular collection was the Edición Ibérica which contained both didactic works and piano repertory. His engraving workshop set works by most Spanish composers and musicologists of the time....

Article

Sylvette Milliot

(b c1693; d Paris, Nov 25, 1733). French music seller and music publisher. He was the nephew of the double bass player and composer Montéclair, and brother of the string instrument maker Claude Boivin. On 15 July 1721 Boivin bought the music shop ‘A la règle d’or’ on the rue St Honoré, Paris, after the death of Henry Foucault who had owned it; he and his uncle went into partnership to trade there. In addition to selling scores he soon published music and bought two licences in 1728 and 1729. He published works by Montéclair, Jacques Loeillet and Quantz, among others. On 2 July 1724 he married Elizabeth Catherine Ballard, second daughter of Jean-Baptiste-Christophe Ballard, who assisted him. As a result of their efforts, and the family connection with Montéclair and Ballard, ‘A la règle d’or’ became one of the foremost music shops in Paris. Works by Vivaldi, Corelli, P.A. Locatelli, Telemann and Quantz could be found there, but the mainstay of the stock was French, including cantatas by Nicolas Bernier and Clérambault, harpsichord works by François Couperin, Louis Marchand and Jean-François Dandrieu, violin sonatas by J.-M. Leclair and Senaillé, sonatas for flute by Louis Hotteterre, suites for viola da gamba by Marais and Caix d’Hervelois, motets by Lalande (...

Article

Andrea Marcialis

(b S Genesio, nr Macerata; d after 1582). Italian composer and editor. From 1561 to 19 April 1562, when he became a canon, he was a soprano at the Santa Casa, Loreto. In 1562 he became a singer at S Marco, Venice, where he stayed until 1567 or 1568. He was also employed as a singer, in exchange for board and lodgings, at the Augustinian convent of S Stefano (where his brother Andrea was a friar) for some months during 1565. In 1566 he accepted employment at Graz, but changed his mind shortly afterwards. By the end of the decade he was a singer and teacher to the Duke of Parma, with whom he remained until at least 1582. While in Venice, he edited two sets of three-voice canzone napolitane (RISM 1565¹² and 15667), four books of madrigals (1566², 1566³, 1567¹³, ...

Article

(b Janesville, WI, Aug 11, 1862; d Hollywood, CA, Dec 28, 1946). American composer and publisher. She showed early talent for improvising songs to her own words and in painting. Her only formal study was with local teachers and at 18 she married E.J. Smith, by whom she had one child. They separated in 1887 and in 1889 she married Frank Lewis Bond. She published her first songs in 1894. Frustrated by difficulties in getting further songs published, and displaying the enterprising spirit that characterized the rest of her life, she formed her own publishing company, Carrie Jacobs-Bond & Son. By performing her songs she cultivated influential contacts. The baritone David Bispham sang a recital exclusively of Bond songs in Chicago in 1901, and friends arranged for her to perform for President Roosevelt at the White House. She published about 175 songs, of which two were highly successful. ...

Article

John Bergsagel

(b c1570; d Copenhagen, Dec 20, 1632). Danish composer, anthologist, organist and instrumentalist probably of Dutch origin. Bonaventura Borchgrevinck, who was possibly his father, took him with him as a treble when he was appointed director of music at the Danish court at Copenhagen on 1 January 1587. Bonaventura left six months later but Melchior stayed on as an instrumentalist and rapidly gained the respect and confidence of the new king, Christian IV. In 1593 his salary was almost doubled, making him, despite his youth, the best-paid musician at court. In 1596 he was sent to Danzig to buy instruments and engage choristers, and at Christmas of that year he was appointed an organist with a further rise in salary. The next year he travelled to England, again to buy instruments, with the party that was sent to bring back the late King Frederik II's Order of the Garter. In ...

Article

Hans-Martin Plesske

(b Darmstadt, June 22, 1744; d Gohlis, nr Leipzig, Dec 9, 1812). German music printer and publisher. Around 1769 he worked as a copper engraver and in 1779 invented a machine which simplified music engraving. He founded his publishing firm in Speyer in 1781; in 1785 another branch (Krämer & Bossler) was established in Darmstadt, where the company moved in ...

Article

Marie Cornaz

(d Brussels, May 4, 1776). Flemish bookseller and music printer. He was the principal music seller in Brussels from 1745 to 1770. As the official printer for the Théâtre de la Monnaie he printed librettos for opéras-comiques and comédies mêlées d'ariettes performed there by composers such as Duni, Monsigny and Philidor, some with a musical supplement. His publications were covered at first by a privilege of impression and sale (1757–66) which applied only to works that had not yet been staged at Brussels, and then by another which allowed Boucherie to print and sell all theatre works. Under this later privilege, he forged Parisian editions (such as Toinon et Toinette by Gossec, with the false address ‘Paris, Veuve Duchesne’) and was involved in the production of two engraved editions of the works of C.-J. van Helmont. Boucherie was the Brussels distributor for Benoit Andrez of Liège, as well as of a large number of essentially Parisian editions of instrumental music, opera librettos and music journals....

Article

Robert J. Bruce and Ian Bartlett

(b London, bap. Sept 11, 1711; d London, Feb 7, 1779 ). English composer, organist and editor. Though formerly best known for some of his anthems and his editing of Cathedral Music (1760–73), the significant contribution he made to instrumental music, song, secular choral and theatre music in England is now widely recognized.

Ian Bartlett

Boyce’s family came from Warwickshire, where his grandfather was a farmer. His father, John, the youngest of five sons, came to London in 1691 to be apprenticed to a joiner. He settled in the City of London, as a joiner and cabinetmaker, and married Elizabeth Cordwell in 1703. They were living in Maiden Lane (now Skinners Lane) when William, the last of their four children, was born. In 1723 John Boyce was appointed resident beadle for the Joiners’ Company, whose headquarters were situated close to his house. Joiners’ Hall became William’s home for the next 30 years or so....

Article

Anik Devriès

(d after 1807). French music publisher. He was an écuyer du Roi when he married Marie-Rose-Jeanne Le Menu in February 1775. In January 1778 Boyer’s wife went into partnership with her mother, Madame Le Menu, in their music publishing business under the name of ‘A la Clé d’Or’, in the rue du Roule in Paris. The firm had been founded by Christophe Le Menu in 1758. The partnership of the ‘Dames Lemenu et Boyer’ lasted until 1783. In May of that year, Boyer, who had bought his mother-in-law’s interest in the firm on 21 January 1779, invested in the business himself. He set up shop at 83 rue Neuve des Petits Champs (between May 1783 and December 1784), then in the rue de Richelieu (or rue de la Loi) in the former café de Foy (between January 1785 and August 1796), and after 1785 he used the name ‘A la Clé d’Or’ for his own establishment. The catalogues he issued under his own name feature both new works and works previously published by Madame Le Menu. From a comparison of the Venier and Boyer catalogues, it would seem that Boyer bought the firm of Jean Baptiste Venier in ...

Article

(b York Co., ME, Oct 6, 1816; d Montclair, NJ, Jan 7, 1868). American composer, teacher, organist, publisher, and piano manufacturer. In 1830 his family moved to Boston, where he studied music with Sumner Hill and attended Lowell Mason’s Academy of Music; he also sang in Mason’s Bowdoin Street church choir and later became organist there. From 1836 he taught music classes and gave private piano lessons in Machias, Maine, then in 1838 became a singing-school teacher in St. John’s, New Brunswick. Bradbury moved to New York in 1840 as choir leader of the First Baptist Church, Brooklyn, and the following year he accepted a position as organist at the Baptist Tabernacle in New York. He established singing classes for children similar to those of Mason in Boston; his annual music festivals with as many as 1000 children led to the introduction of music in New York’s public schools. He also published his first collection, ...

Article

J.H. Alexander

(b Lempster, NH, Feb 14, 1814; d Cleveland, OH, April 8, 1871). American music publisher. He moved to Cleveland in 1834 and with Henry J. Mould opened a music shop, Brainard and Mould, two years later. By 1845 the company was known as S. Brainard and in that year began to publish music; this business (known as S. Brainard & Sons from 1866) became one of the most important in the country. Brainard published popular music, mostly pieces for piano and songs for solo voice with piano accompaniment, but also a few sacred hymns and quartets. Also in 1845 Brainard bought Watson Hall (built 1840, known as Melodeon Hall, 1845–60, and then Brainard’s Hall until 1872), where many musical events took place. Brainard was a flautist who participated in and arranged works for musical organizations in Cleveland. The company opened branches in New York, Louisville and Chicago (where it was eventually based), and in ...

Article

David Johnson

(b ?Edinburgh, c1713; d London, May 12, 1789). Scottish music publisher. He established his business in Edinburgh in mid-1754, and had considerable early success: his first issues included Niccolo Pasquali’s excellent Thorough-Bass Made Easy (1757); his own The Rudiments of Music (1756, 3/1763), an instruction book commissioned by the Edinburgh town council for newly formed church choirs; and reprints of the fiddle variations on Scottish tunes by the locally celebrated William McGibbon. Bremner also profited from a fashionable boom in guitar playing, publishing a guitar arrangement of Twelve Scots Tunes (c1760) and Instructions for the Guitar (1758, 2/1765), which was probably written by his son Robert who had been sent to London to study the guitar with Geminiani. From 1755 Bremner supplied sheet music regularly to the influential Edinburgh Musical Society, and travelled to London and Dublin to act as its agent. In ...

Article

Ann Willison Lemke

[Bettine, Elisabeth]

(b Frankfurt, April 4, 1785; d Berlin, Jan 20, 1859). German writer, editor, publisher, composer, singer, visual artist and patron of young artists. Although known today primarily for her writing and her illustrious associates, Bettine was also a talented musician. She composed songs in a simple folk style, choosing texts by poets she knew and loved, including Goethe, Achim von Armin, and her brother, Clemens Brentano. She helped gather songs for Armin and Brentano’s influential collection Des Knaben Wunderhorn (1806–8) and decades later published a fourth volume based on their notes (ed. Ludwig Erk, 1854). From 1808 to 1809 she studied singing and composition with Peter von Winter and the piano with Sebastian Bopp in Munich. Her first two songs appeared under the pseudonym ‘Beans Beor’ (‘blessing I am blessed’) with Arnim’s literary works. After her crucial meeting with Beethoven in Vienna (May, 1810), she mediated between him and Goethe....

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(b Bar-le-Duc; fl Avignon, 1530–35). French type designer. He designed the first music type with round note heads, used in publications by Jean de Channey of works by Carpentras. Briard’s elegant notes are beautifully proportioned and teardrop-shaped, and he did not use ligatures, fig.7).

Printing & publishing of music, §I, 3(ii): Printing from type: Early history...