1,261-1,280 of 57,944 results

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Mark Lomanno

(b Sincelejo, Colombia, Feb 18, 1949). American saxophonist of Colombian birth. His father was a percussionist who performed traditional Colombian music and Almario began his career playing in this style. Influenced by the Cuban music that was popular along the Caribbean coast of Colombia, Almario studied wind instruments and theory in Barranquilla, where he later moved. After a tour of the United States in ...

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Ferenc László

(b Cluj [now Cluj-Napoca], Dec 8, 1934). Romanian-Hungarian ethnomusicologist. He studied music education and choir direction under János Jagamas, Ferenc Major and István Nagy at the Cluj Academy of Music (1951–6). He joined the Folklore Archives of the Romanian Academy of Sciences (...

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Almast  

Stephen Johnson

Opera in two acts by Alexander Spendiaryan to a libretto by the composer and S. Parnok after Hovhannes Tumanyan’s poem Tmkabert aṙumē; (‘The Capture of Tmkabert’); Moscow, Bol’shoy Theatre, 1930.

The opera is set in the Crimea in the 18th century. Almast (soprano), a frail and beautiful girl of noble descent, is betrothed to Tatul, the ruler of the Armenian fortress of Tmkabert, which is under threat from the armies of Nadir, Shah of Persia. At first Almast is faithful to Tatul and to his people, but a Persian musician (tenor), sent as a spy by Nadir, persuades her by the power of his art that marriage to the Shah would mean greatness for herself and her country. Almast betrays Tatul to Nadir, but the Armenian people rise up, liberate the fortress and collectively sentence Almast to exile. Her fate in the opera is therefore very different from that related by Tumanyan, where she is killed by the bored Nadir....

Article

(b Lisbon, May 21, 1940). Portuguese composer and conductor. He began his music studies with Marina Dwander, Artur Santos and Joly Braga Santos. In 1959 he completed his higher degree in piano studies with Campos Coelho at the National Conservatory, Lisbon. In 1960...

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(b Santos, Sept 2, 1917; d Sherman Oaks, CA, July 26, 1995). Brazilian guitarist, composer and arranger. He was taught the piano by his mother but secretly taught himself the guitar (borrowing his sister’s instrument) from the age of nine. He first worked for radio stations in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, and in ...

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(b Lisbon, June 24, 1744; d Madrid, c 1817). Portuguese tenor and composer active in Spain. He sang in Lisbon, Braga, Santiago de Compostela and Mondeñedo (after October 1772) and as maestro de capilla in Lugo (after July 1775) and Astorga (after ...

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(b Neuilly-sur-Seine, Jan 20, 1928; d Pittsburgh, Feb 18, 1997). French conductor. He studied with Ginastera in Argentina and with Hindemith, Koussevitzky and Szell in the USA, joining the opera department at the University of Southern California and setting up and directing the opera school of Occidental College, Los Angeles. He subsequently held conducting posts with the Portuguese RSO in Lisbon (...

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Robert Stevenson

(b Lisbon, c1600; d Tomar, March 21, 1660). Portuguese composer. He studied with Duarte Lobo. In 1638 he professed as a friar in the military Order of Christ at the royal monastery at Tomar, where he was mestre de capela. He was elected visitor of his order in ...

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Manuel Carlos De Brito

(fl 1722–52). Portuguese composer and organist. Between 1722 (or earlier) and 1726 he was a royal scholar in Rome. On the second Sunday in Lent 1722 his oratorio ll pentimento di Davidde was performed in S Girolamo della Carità and on 9 July 1724...

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Robert Stevenson

(b Guimarães, Feb 18, 1760; d Braga, Oct 25, 1825). Portuguese composer. In 1790 he became acting (and on 19 August 1793 titular) mestre de capela at Nossa Senhora da Oliveira, Guimarães, the collegiate church in which he was baptized. Vasconcellos’s claim that he long served at Braga Cathedral as ...

Article

Harry B. Soria

(b Honolulu, HI, Nov 28, 1897; d Honolulu, HI, Oct 9, 1985). Hawaiian singer, musician, composer, and bandleader. Almeida lost his eyesight completely by age ten, and left school after the sixth grade. His father returned to Portugal, and his Hawaiian mother and adoptive Hawaiian father nurtured him, immersing him in the music and culture of the rural community. At age 15, Almeida formed his first musical group, the Waianae Star Glee Club, and soon achieved local fame as “John C. Almeida, Hawaii’s Blind Musician.” Eventually, he replaced his birth middle name of Celestino, with the name of his adoptive father, Kameaaloha, and is remembered today as John Kameaaloha Almeida....

Article

Norman Fraser and Gerard Béhague

(b S Antônio de Jesus, Bahia, Dec 6, 1895; d Rio de Janeiro, Jan 25, 1981). Brazilian musicologist and folklorist. After graduating from law school in Rio de Janeiro, he set out to be an author, journalist and critic. His first writings dealt with criticism and philosophy, but he also wrote important works on music, including the well-known ...

Article

Cathy Ragland

(b Skidmore, TX, July 25, 1911; d Sunnyside, WA, July 8, 1999). American conjunto musician. Santiago Almeida is best known for playing the bajo sexto on some of the earliest and best known recordings of Texas-Mexican conjunto music. Almeida was born into a farmworker family that played music to make ends meet. At 15, he joined the family band, Orquesta Almeida, and played numerous dances in the lower Rio Grande Valley. It was at these dances that he likely encountered accordionist ...

Article

Almena  

John A. Parkinson

Opera in three acts by Michael Arne and Jonathan Battishill to a libretto by Richard Rolt; London, Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, 2 November 1764.

The sultan of Persia has been desposed and killed by the villain Mohammed (bass) who then makes advances to the sultan’s widow Aspatia (soprano), who is also loved by the sultan’s Vizier (bass). Aspana’s daughter Almena (soprano) is wooed by the hero Mirza (soprano castrato), the late sultan’s nephew. He has also aroused the affection of Zara (soprano), Mohammed’s sister. When Mirza is thrown into prison, Zara assumes a disguise and rescues him, without overturning his love for Almena. Eventually all ends happily with the lovers reunited. Michael Arne provided the arias for the hero and heroine, whereas Battishill was responsible for Mohammed and Zara’s arias and the choruses. Strangely, their contributions were published separately. Arne’s florid music include Almena’s aria ‘No fears alarm’ which features a remarkable mandolin obbligato....

Article

Lyndesay G. Langwill and James B. Kopp

(b Ronsdorf [now Wuppertal], Germany, Oct 3, 1786; d Biebrich, Germany, Sept 14, 1843). German bassoonist, inventor, and composer. Largely self-taught, he was a professional bassoonist in Cologne from 1808. After a period with the Frankfurt Nationaltheater (1812–14) he returned to Cologne as bandmaster of the 3rd Prussian Militia, then accepted a similar position in Mainz (...

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Nigel Fortune

(b Senigallia, Aug 17, 1629; d after 1689). Italian composer. In 1654 he was maestro di camera to the papal nuncio to Venice, in 1689 canon and maestro di cappella of Senigallia Cathedral. He published two volumes of motets for small groups. The first (Venice, ...

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Albert Cohen

A kind of lute, perhaps one activated by a wheel, invented by the French polymath Jean Le Maire. The word ‘almérie’ is an anagram of the inventor’s name. Le Maire (b Chaumont-en-Bassigny, Haute-Marne, c1581; dc1650) was a mathematician, engineer, and inventor who lived in Toulouse and Paris. His widespread interests led to the development of novelties in such diverse areas as architecture, language, mnemotechnics, and typography. In music, in addition to the ...

Article

A kind of lute, perhaps one activated by a wheel, invented by the French polymath Jean Le Maire (c1581–c1650). The word ‘almérie’ is an anagram of the inventor's name.

Article

Mikko Heiniö

(b Helsinki, June 13, 1953). Finnish conductor and composer. He studied conducting at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki with Jorma Panula (diploma 1979) and shared first prize in the Nordic Conductors’ Competition at Norrköping. He was conductor of the Polytechnic Orchestra (...

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Almira  

Anthony Hicks

Singspiel in three acts by George Frideric Handel to a libretto by Friedrich Christian Feustking after Giulio Pancieri’s L’Almira (1691, Venice); Hamburg, Theater am Gänsemarkt, 8 January 1705 (according to Mattheson, relevant wordbooks are dated 1704).

Handel’s first opera, produced when he was 19, is strongly influenced by the example of the leading Hamburg composer Reinhard Keiser in its brilliant fusion of French, Gemman and Italian styles. The libretto was in fact intended for Keiser, and was set by him for production in Hamburg in ...