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Mauricio Molino

Percussion idiophone of Spain. It is a mortar made of metal, played by beating it internally and rhythmically with the head of a pestle. The same instrument is used in Panama, where it forms part of a percussion ensemble to accompany the tamborito, an Afro-Hispanic recreational dance....

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Isabel Pope and Tess Knighton

(fl1482). Iberian composer. He was a singer in the Aragonese royal chapel of Ferdinand V over a period of almost 30 years, from 1482 until 1510. He was presented to various ecclesiastical benefices under royal patronage and held, presumably by proxy, the position of head chaplain of the Dominican monastery in Madrid until ...

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Lennart Hedwall

(b Stockholm, Nov 28, 1793; d Bremen, Sept 26, 1866). Swedish author, pedagogue, journalist, and composer. After an education administered mainly by private tutors, Almqvist attended university in Uppsala and graduated in 1816. He then took a position as a government clerk in Stockholm, where he engaged in youthful and idealistic movements that worshiped Gothic ideals, the early German romanticism, and Swedenborg’s teachings. He was soon the leading spirit in these circles, and with his visionary religiosity he gained almost prophet-like status among them. In an attempt to realize his ideals, from ...

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Peter Andreas Kjeldsberg and Martin Anderson

(b Fredrikstad, April 29, 1872; d Oslo, Dec 24, 1932). Norwegian composer, conductor and organist. He studied with Peter Lindeman (organ) and Iver Holter (harmony, counterpoint and composition) at the Christiania Music and Organ School (1888–92), and was then a pupil of Reinecke (composition) and Ruthard (piano) at the Leipzig Conservatory (...

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Faruk Yener

(b Istanbul, March 11, 1906; d Ankara, July 27, 1978). Turkish composer and conductor. He had his first music lessons from his mother. He showed a precocious talent for playing the qānūn and at 16 he composed a musical play in traditional Turkish monophonic style. In ...

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Alo  

Jeremy Montagu

Large clapperless bell of the Igbo people of Nigeria. It is a single bell, made of forged iron, 90 to 120 cm tall, and is struck by a wooden beater with soft padding around the end. Its main use is by women’s groups to accompany singing and for the ...

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See Tomasini family

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Günter Thomas

In 

See Tomasini family

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Jerome Roche

(b Bologna; fl1628–44). Italian composer. He became a Franciscan friar and a doctor of theology; he was also maestro di cappella of the Cathedral of Sacile, near Udine, and later, in 1628, at the Franciscan friary in Bologna. With several other Italian musicians, he was active in the establishment of Cardinal Franz von Dietrichstein, Prince-Bishop of Olomouc, from ...

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Robert Stevenson

(b Huánuco, Jan 3, 1871; d Lima, July 17, 1942). Peruvian ethnomusicologist and composer. At the age of 13 he was sent by his mother to live with her brother at Lima, and there in 1887 he began studies of solfège with Manuel de la Cruz Panizo and the piano with Claudio Rebagliatti. He studied medicine at the Lima Facultad de S Fernando (...

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Alonso  

(fl 1500). Spanish composer. He may be identifiable with Alonso de Plaja.

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(b Granada, May 9, 1887; d Madrid, May 18, 1948). Spanish composer . He displayed musical ability from an early age but studied medicine before turning to music. At 18 he became director of a military band, conducted the Granada Philharmonic Society, and composed his first zarzuela, ...

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Christiane Heine

(b Ochandiano, Vizcaya, July 16, 1929; d Madrid, June 5, 2002). Spanish composer. After early musical training in Medina de Pomar and Burgos, Bernaola, who used his mother’s surname, began his career as a professional clarinettist. He studied composition with Enrique Massó, Francisco Calés Otero and Julio Gómez at the Real Conservatorio, Madrid, and he also attended summer courses given by Jolivet and Tansman in Santiago de Compostela (...

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Marita P. McClymonds

Opera seria in three acts by Francesco Bianchi to a libretto by Giuseppe Maria Foppa , after Ferdinando Moretti ’s libretto Idalide; Venice, Teatro S Benedetto, 7 February 1786.

The plot, a romance between the conquistador Alonso (soprano castrato) and the Inca sun-maiden Cora (soprano), closely follows Moretti’s libretto as set by Giuseppe Sarti (...

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Angel Medina

(b Villarín de Campos, Zamora, Aug 25, 1925; d Bilbao, September 5, 2002). Spanish composer. He studied initially at the Ciudad Rodrigo Seminary with Cándido Ledesma (1936), becoming a priest in 1948 and then studied in Salamanca with Hilario Goyenechea, and (...

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Nathan Mishori

(b Tel-Aviv, Oct 19, 1930; d New York, Oct 4, 1994). Israeli composer. She studied at the Tel-Aviv Music Teachers’ College (1948–50) and at the Israel Academy of Music (1950–52), where her principal teachers were Oedoen Partos (composition) and Ilona Vincze-Kraus (piano). Later, she was composer-in-residence at the Bar-Ilan University (...

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Aloysia Weber as Zémire in Grétry’s ‘Zémire et Azor’: engraving by Johann Esaias Nilson

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August Corbet, Corneel Mertens and Diana von Volborth-Danys

(b Antwerp, Sept 12, 1876; d Antwerp, Oct 5, 1954). Belgian composer and conductor. He studied in Antwerp at the Flemish Music School (later called the Royal Flemish Conservatory) under Peter Benoit and Jan Blockx, and conducting under Eduard Keurvels. In 1903 he became professor at the Conservatory, and was director of that institution from ...

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David Cummings

(b Budapest, March 5, 1903). Hungarian soprano . After study with Laura Hilgermann she sang in Budapest from 1923. In Munich, Berlin and Vienna her agile coloratura was admired in the roles of Gilda, Rosina and the Queen of Night. She had her greatest success in operetta, appearing in Millöcker’s ...

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Romantischkomisches Zauberspiel by Wenzel Müller to a libretto by Ferdinand Raimund ; Vienna, Theater in der Leopoldstadt, 17 October 1828.

Probably the masterpiece of both dramatist and composer, Der Alpenkönig und der Menschenfeind can stand comparison with Molière in its depiction of the two sides of the character of a misanthrope. Herr von Rappelkopf (tenor) is cured of his misanthropy through the intervention of Astragalus (spoken), the King of the Alps, with whom under duress he exchanges appearances. Rappelkopf’s eviction of the charcoal burner’s family, a scene considered by some to be chillingly proto-naturalistic, is accompanied by the ensemble ‘So leb denn wohl, du stilles Haus’. The scenes of domestic life, with well-drawn comic servants, are more effective than those depicting young love; best of all is the role of Rappelkopf (which Raimund wrote for himself), with its lively and attractive songs. If the five choruses lack any great individuality the ensembles, and especially the solo numbers for Rappelkopf (for example the explosive entry song ‘Ha! Ja, das kann nicht mehr so bleiben’), are simple but highly effective. Raimund played the part to great acclaim both in Vienna and during his guest seasons in Germany. The play was successfully performed in London (Adelphi Theatre) in ...