121-140 of 488 results  for:

Clear all

Article

Patricia Brown

(b Chatham Islands, New Zealand, June 24, 1948). New Zealand and Australian musicologist. He studied at Victoria University, Wellington, gaining the BA in 1970; moving to the University of Canterbury, he took the MA in 1972, and the doctorate in 1976, with a dissertation on John Coprario. He was a research fellow at the University of Sydney (1976–8, 1981–90) and at the University of Queensland (1979–80), and senior research fellow (reader) in musicology at the University of Sydney (1991–4). In 1990 he was elected Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. In 1995 he was made professor of historical musicology. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society in 2002 and was a recipient of Australia’s Centenary Medal in 2003. His main areas of activity have been European music, musicians and musical sources of the 16th and 17th centuries, particularly in England, Germany and Italy. He has rediscovered music and sources, and published meticulous studies of these and other materials, of which his annotated catalogue of the works of Giovanni Gabrieli, described by one reviewer as a ‘major breakthrough’, is a fine example. Early performing practice, especially of Venetian music, is another area where he has provided new insights. A prolific music editor, he has published critical editions of the complete works of Giovanni Gabrieli, Giovanni Bassano and members of the Ferrabosco family. Other composers on whose music he has worked include J.C. Bach, Giovanni Croce, Hans Leo Hassler, John Hingeston, Thomas Lupo, Claudio Monteverdi and Adam Gumpelzhaimer. Collaboration with recording artists, such as the Gabrieli Consort & Players, directed by Paul McCreesh, has resulted in a number of outstanding compact discs and a video, variously released by Deutsche Grammophon, Sony Classical, EMI Classics, Hyperion and others....

Article

Stephen Adams

(b Stoke-on-Trent, March 31, 1958). Australian composer, performer, and sound artist. Chesworth’s work has been given relatively little attention to date by musicologists. This is perhaps in part a consequence of the apparently populist appeal of his musical surfaces. It might also be a result of his collaborative working methods, and his implicit critique of traditional concepts of the composer’s role, and of the boundaries between art forms, genres, academic, and popular subcultures, making his work difficult to categorize.

In 1969 Chesworth emigrated from the UK with his parents. Following high school, he attended La Trobe University, studying music, even though he had arrived with no formal musical training (though he did possess sound engineering skills and plenty of musical ideas). He quickly developed an interest in composition, studying with Warren Burt and Graham Hair (1976–9), and continued at La Trobe as a tutor for two years beyond graduation. La Trobe introduced him to post-World War II European modernism and the American and British experimental traditions. Simultaneously he became active in the post-punk wave of experimentation, producing his first landmark recordings, ...

Article

Ian Dando

New Zealand city. Known colloquially as the Choral City, Christchurch developed a strong choral tradition from its settlement by the English in 1851. The pioneering Canterbury Vocal Union became the nucleus of the Royal Christchurch Musical Society, founded in 1860. In 1927 Victor Peters started the Christchurch Harmonic Society. With two large choirs competing for a similar audience, amalgamation into the 160-strong Christchurch City Choir in 1991 under the conductor Brian Law became inevitable. Its landmark was the Australasian première of Szymanowski's Symphony no.3 in 1997. The most prominent of the many chamber choirs is the Jubilate Singers, founded in 1977 by Martin Setchell, who directed the country's first authentic performance of Monteverdi's Vespers. In 1988 its new director, John Pattinson, extended its repertory to all eras.

The nucleus of Christchurch's professional music activity is the Christchurch SO (founded 1973), with its key support role for local opera, ballet and choirs. The amateur 75-piece Christchurch Youth Orchestra performs much local music, 20th-century repertory such as Stravinsky, Kodály and Shostakovich, and standard symphonic works. The professionally funded Canterbury Opera, founded in ...

Article

(b Sydney, Aug 3, 1928). Australian double bass player . His father was a saxophonist who served as mayor of Christchurch, New Zealand, and president of New Zealand’s musicians’ union; other members of his family were musical as well. Christie studied medicine at Otago University (BM 1957). Later, while practicing professionally in Sydney (from 1961), he led his own groups and recorded with Errol Buddle (1963) and Judy Bailey (1964). After moving to New York in 1965 he became chief resident at Yonkers General Hospital. He studied with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra double bass player Homer Mensch (1968–9) and played in symphony orchestras, though he also worked with Mike Mainieri (recording with him in 1967), Jaki Byard, Paul Winter, Chet Baker, Ahmad Jamal, and many others. In the 1970s he toured and recorded with Toshiko Akiyoshi (1971), toured Germany with Attila Zoller (...

Article

Graham Hair and Greta Mary Hair

(b Sydney, Jan 19, 1945). Australian composer, conductor and teacher. She studied English and French at the Australian National University (BA 1966) and music with Larry Sitsky at the Canberra School of Music; later she studied at the Kodály Institute in Hungary (Diploma of Music Education 1982). On her return to Canberra in 1983 she founded Gaudeamus, an institute for music teaching and performance for children, youth and adults. She has been particularly involved with composing and conducting vocal music – especially for children’s voices – and her output includes much choral and church music. She has also written many stage works for children, most of them to her own texts, and incidental music for several plays.

(selective list)

Article

Philip L. Scowcroft

(b Sydney, Sept 26, 1866; d London, Nov 17, 1951). British pianist and composer of Australian birth. He came to London in 1889 after touring as a pianist in Asia and Australasia and appeared as an accompanist in England before concentrating on composition. He also wrote music criticism for The Observer from 1908 to 1918 and later was vice chairman of the Performing Right Society. Until about 1914 his compositions were not aimed at a wide commercial audience: orchestral works were performed by major London orchestras and four operas were staged, including King Harlequin which was produced in Berlin. The watershed between his serious and light music was his collaboration with the composer Bath and the lyricist Basil Hood in a patriotic operetta, Young England, produced in Birmingham in 1916, before transferring to Daly's and then Drury Lane in London. This was the first of several musicals both original and using music, though not exclusively so, by others, like the popular ...

Article

Derek Coller

(b Melbourne, Australia, Feb 21, 1931). Australian trombonist and bandleader . Originally a brass-band musician, from 1948 he led his own semiprofessional jazz bands, the Jazz Bandits (1948–50) and the Jazz Kings (1950–62). He began playing professionally in 1962 as a member of the Melbourne New Orleans Jazz Band, which visited England in 1963. Collie remained in England and joined the London City Stompers (1963); when he became leader in 1966 the group was renamed the Rhythm Aces. It has performed at festivals and concerts and in theaters throughout the world. During one of its three American tours (1973–5) it won the World Championship of Jazz in Indianapolis (August 1975). In 1984 Collie began touring with a show called “New Orleans Mardi Gras,” in which Ken Colyer and Cy Laurie appeared; from 1986, in addition, he presented “The High Society Show” with many of the same musicians. He has made a large number of recordings as a leader (from ...

Article

Alan Blyth

(b Ballarat, April 16, 1927; d London, Dec 7, 1971). Australian soprano. She studied in Melbourne, making her début there in 1954 as Santuzza, then touring as Magda in The Consul. After further study in Milan and London, she joined the Covent Garden company in 1956, making her début as Musetta. Among the roles she sang there were Tosca, Aida, Butterfly, Liù, Elisabeth de Valois, Lisa (Queen of Spades), Manon Lescaut, Jenůfa, Chrysothemis (which she recorded for Solti) and Marie (Wozzeck). In 1962 she created the role of Hecuba in Tippett’s King Priam, and the following year sang Katerina Izmaylova in the first British staging of Shostakovich’s opera. In all, she sang 293 performances at the Royal Opera. At Sadler’s Wells she sang Venus, Tosca, Concepcion (L’heure espagnole) and Kát’a. At the Metropolitan, New York, she created the role of Christine in Marvin David Levy’s ...

Article

Elizabeth Forbes

(b Port Elizabeth, Oct 22, 1946; d London, February 18, 2012). Irish soprano of South African birth. She studied at the London Opera Centre, making her début in 1972 as a mezzo-soprano at Wexford as Varvara (Kát'a Kabanová). With Australian Opera (1973–4) she sang Venus, Kostelnička and Amneris. Engaged by the ENO (1975–80), she sang Eboli, Azucena, Mariya Bolkonskaya (War and Peace), Herodias, Waltraute (which she recorded under Goodall), Kabanicha, Eglantine (Euryanthe), Rossini's Isabella, Bartók's Judith, Sieglinde, Santuzza, Donna Elvira and Marina. She made her Covent Garden début in 1976 as Viclinda (I Lombardi). After Ortrud and Brangäne at Bayreuth (1980–81), she cancelled all engagements, reappearing in 1983 as a soprano. Following performances of Fiordiligi at La Scala, she sang Electra (Idomeneo) in Salzburg and Norma in Geneva. She made her Metropolitan début as Vitellia (...

Article

Michael Barkl

(b Sydney, Aug 27, 1944). Australian composer. After initial involvement in music as a jazz pianist, he studied at the University of Sydney (MA, 1965–9), where his teachers included Sculthorpe (composition), with Takemitsu on a Churchill Fellowship to Japan (1970), and at the University of Melbourne (DMus 1980). A Harkness Fellowship facilitated further research and study at the University of California, San Diego and Princeton University (1972–4); an Australia Council Fellowship enabled him to spend a year at the University of Aix-Marseille (1974); and a Fulbright Senior Fellowship funded study at the University of Minnesota and Pennsylvania State University (1982). In 1975 he accepted a teaching post at the University of Melbourne and later served as dean of creative arts at the University of Wollongong (1990–94). He was appointed vice-chancellor of Southern Cross University in 1994...

Article

Alice M. Moyle and Stephen A. Wild

An Australian Aboriginal dance with music, generally performed publicly; the same word may denote an Aboriginal occasion on which public singing and dancing take place. Pronounced with the emphasis on the second syllable, the term probably originated (perhaps with different emphasis) in an Aboriginal language of New South Wales in the latter part of the 18th century, although it now has a wider currency among non-Aboriginal Australians than among Aborigines. The words ‘boojery carib-berie’ (‘good dance’) appear in John Hunter's An Historical Journal of Events at Sydney and at Sea, 1787–1792 (ed. J. Bach, Sydney, 1968, p.145). Aboriginal words for public singing and dancing used by people of different language groups in other parts of Australia include purlapa (Warlpiri language), inma (Pitjantjatjara), turlku (Pintupi), ltarta (Alyawarra) in the central and western deserts; dyunba (Wunambal, Worora, Ungarinyin), nurlu (Nyigina, Yawuru, Dyugun, Ngumbarl, Dyabirr Dyabirr, Warrwa), ilma (Nyul Nyul, Bardi), maru (Garadyarri), ...

Article

Bruce Johnson

[Francis James ]

(b Emmaville, Australia, Sept 10, 1904; d Sydney, 6 or April 7, 1979). Australian bandleader, trombonist, trumpeter, arranger, and singer. From 1922 he worked in Sydney and Melbourne in the bands, among others, of Bill James (1923), Frank Ellis (1924), Walter Beban (1925), Carol Laughner (1926–7), and Linn Smith (1927–8). In England he worked with Jack Hylton, Fred Elizalde, Al Collins, and Al Starita (all 1928–9). Following his return to Australia he played as a sideman and as a leader in Brisbane, Sydney, and Melbourne, and during a residency at the Sydney Trocadero (1936–9) he established a reputation as a pre-eminent swing bandleader. He led an army band (1943–5), then played again at the Sydney Trocadero (1946–51, 1954–70), after which he gradually withdrew from musical activities. The finest dance-band and swing musicians in Australia passed through the ranks of Coughlan’s band....

Article

David Tunley

(b Sydney, Feb 1, 1931). Australian musicologist, music critic and conductor. He graduated from the University of Queensland with the BA in 1964 and founded the department of music at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, in 1966 (the university first offered music as an interdisciplinary study before it established an institute of practical studies and music education). He took the doctorate at New South Wales in 1976 and was appointed Chair in 1984. His work covers a broad spectrum and includes writings on 17th-century Italian and 19th-century German and French opera, but his major contribution has been in Australian music. His Australia's Music: Themes of a New Society (1967) is regarded as the classic study on this topic, and his insights into the Australian repertory (and beyond) have been sharpened through his work as chief music critic at the Sydney Morning Herald (from 1960...

Article

J.M. Thomson

(Richard)

(b Wellington, Oct 13, 1944). New Zealand composer. He came from a strong Salvation Army background, and began his extensive musical studies at Victoria University of Wellington with Frederick Page and Douglas Lilburn (BMus 1968) and continued with a Commonwealth Scholarship, at Toronto University (MMus 1970), Aberdeen University (PhD 1974) and a Netherlands government bursary at the Institute of Sonology in Utrecht (1974–5). From 1976 to 1978 he taught at Glasgow University, and between 1980 and 1982 he was Forman Fellow in Composition at Edinburgh, in the final year taking a computer music course at MIT. He was Cramb Fellow in Composition at Glasgow University (1982–5) and then worked as a freelance composer based in Edinburgh, which involved numerous European and antipodean cultural visits. He has been closely associated with the BBC Scottish SO which has given premières of several of his works, notably the Cello Concerto (...

Article

Laurence Libin

(b Napier, New Zealand, May 14, 1946). Intermedia artist whose transdisciplinary practice includes video/sound work and installations, experimental instruments, graphic scores, and improvisation. He studied at Elam School of Fine Arts, Auckland (DipFA Hons, 1971) and the University of West Sydney, Nepean (MA Hons, 2000). Since the early 1970s his sound-based artworks have involved newly invented instruments. A member of the original Scratch Orchestra in London (1968–9), Dadson founded Scratch Orchestra (NZ) in 1970 and later From Scratch (1974–2004). A key part of From Scratch’s development was instrument invention, from using found objects to making unique, custom-designed devices. Tunings evolved from randomly pitched sounds to 12-note and microtonal tunings, and just intonation. Central to this development were tuned percussion stations composed of rack-supported, four-tiered assemblies of PVC pipes, tuned-tongue bamboos and bells (in which parallel slots cut in the materials produce a vibrating tongue matching the resonant frequency of the open or closed tubes), and roto-tom drums, combined with special methods of playing. These percussion stations, along with other novel struck and spun acoustic instruments, produced the characteristic From Scratch sound. More recent instruments include the Zitherum (long-stringed instruments that are drummed and bowed), the metal-pronged Nundrum, the stroked RodBaschet, the gong tree, Foley-trays, the Water Cooler Drumkit, water bells, the Gloop-spring-string-drum family, the Sprong family, and other fanciful types....

Article

Michael Hannan

Tragic opera in one act by James Penberthy to a libretto bv Mary Durack after her novel Keep him my Country; Perth, Australia, Somerville Auditorium, 22 January 1959.

Dalgerie (soprano), an aboriginal woman with leprosy, waits to see her former white lover and employer, Stan (baritone), before she dies. There is a series of flashbacks to the events leading to the present. Because a marriage between Dalgerie and Stan is forbidden by tribal law, she performs love magic to ensure that ‘though they may be parted in life, their spirits can be united in death’. Dalgerie resists tribal love rituals (played by a band of aborigines) and Stan tries to take her away from them, but she realizes that she now belongs to Julunggal, the snake. Dalgerie leaves the district and spreads a rumour that she has died. In their final meeting she reassures Stan that they will be reunited, and then dies in his arms. Penberthy’s score makes use of driving rhythmic and melodic ideas from aboriginal music, combined with his own romantic idiom that he feels is a response to the mystical and melancholic qualities of the Australian landscape. ...

Article

Andrew D. McCredie

revised by Samantha Owens

(b Sydney, Australia, April 16, 1887; d Brisbane, Australia, July 31, 1959). Australian conductor, composer, and music collector. He studied with Arthur Mason and Gordon Lavers in Sydney. In 1912 he was appointed organist and choir director at Christ Church Anglican Cathedral and conductor of the choral society in Grafton, New South Wales. After war service he went to London for further study with Frederick Bridge, R.R. Terry, and Charles W. Pearce. He returned to Australia in 1919 and settled in Brisbane, where he served as organist and choirmaster at St Andrew’s Presbyterian Church (1919–32) and the Anglican churches of St Thomas at Toowong (1933) and All Saints, Wickham Terrace (1933–41). He directed the University of Queensland’s Musical Society (1920–30), an association that culminated in what was believed to have been the first Bach Festival in the southern hemisphere, held in ...

Article

Bruce Johnson

revised by Roger T. Dean

[David Frederick ]

(b Freeling, nr Gawler, Australia, Oct 25, 1914; d Adelaide, South Australia, March 24, 2003). Australian composer, bandleader, pianist, arranger, and trombonist. He was first exposed to jazz through recordings, notably those of Duke Ellington. In 1945 he took over the leadership of the Southern Jazz Group, a dixieland band in Adelaide, and in 1946 appeared with it at the first Australian Jazz Convention; the band recorded several times between then and 1950, and Dallwitz remained its leader for its intermittent performances from 1951 to 1961. He then withdrew from jazz, but continued to play (on cello and bassoon) and compose in symphonic, chamber, and light-music contexts. His return to jazz performance and composition was marked by a recording in 1972. From that time he led several concert bands, including the Hot Six, a big band, and a ragtime ensemble – the last reflecting a change in his interests; these different groups provided opportunities for the presentation of his prolific compositional output, which often focused on Australian history. His finest album, ...

Article

Elizabeth Forbes

(b Melbourne, Sept 29, 1950). Australian countertenor. He studied in Brisbane and made his début in 1974 at Vadstena, Sweden, in Provenzale’s La Stellidaura vendicata. He has sung with Scottish Opera, at Berne, Amsterdam, Venice, Innsbruck, Paris, Geneva, Munich, Buxton and Lausanne. His repertory includes Monteverdi’s Orfeo and ...

Article

Bruce Johnson

(James )

(b Sydney, Aug 22, 1943). Australian bandleader, drummer, composer, and arranger. He first played in pop groups, then from 1959 worked in nightclubs and recording studios. After touring in the USA with the singer Kirby Stone, Si Zentner, and Buddy DeFranco (1967–8) he returned to Australia and, with Ed Wilson, formed the Daly–Wilson Big Band (1969). This group performed and recorded until 1971, then, following a period of inactivity, re-formed in 1973; its personnel included at different times the best Australian big-band and studio musicians of the period. Daly’s work with the band is heard to advantage on My Goodness, from The Daly–Wilson Big Band on Tour (1973, Rep. 4003). After the group disbanded in 1983 Daly formed his own big band the following year; he also worked as a music director in television. He performed occasionally in the 1990s, and then after taking a four-year break from music, resumed performing and bandleading in spring ...