121-140 of 2,680 results  for:

  • 17th c./Early to mid-Baroque (1600-1700) x
Clear all

Article

Mariangela Donà

(b Milan, c1570; d Milan, 1630). Italian composer and organist. We know from the dedication of his Partitura del 2o libro delli motetti (1599) that he was Milanese and a pupil of Claudio Merulo, with whom he probably studied between 1584 and 1586 in Mantua. On 12 December 1591 he was appointed organist of Milan Cathedral at a salary of 400 imperial lire, and he kept this post until his death. The influence of Merulo is recognizable in his works ‘in the clarity of the counterpoint and the nature of the invention’ (to quote his own words). Banchieri numbered him among the most celebrated organists of his time.

Article

Lini Hübsch-Pfleger

(b Nuremberg, Dec 28, 1625; d Nuremberg, Dec 10, 1696). German poet and theologian. He spent virtually his entire life at Nuremberg. He was educated at the St Egidien Gymnasium (whose director from 1642 was J.M. Dilherr), and from 1644 at Altdorf University. He gained the master's degree at Jena in 1647. In 1648 he went to Leipzig and then travelled to Hamburg but arrived completely destitute after risking his life in an escape from marauding soldiers. During 1649 he participated in a disputation at Helmstedt on Original Sin chaired by the controversial syncretist G.C. Calixtus. In 1650 he returned to Nuremberg and in 1651 was appointed curate, and in 1652 deacon, of the Egidienkirche. He officiated as Monday preacher at St Salvator and, after being ordained at Altdorf on 14 May 1653, was from 1654 morning preacher at St Walpurg auf der Vesten. In 1659 he became deacon of St Lorenz, the leading church in Nuremberg, where in ...

Article

Nona Pyron and Peter Allsop

(b Bologna, Feb 26, 1619; d Bologna, July 17, 1701). Italian organist and composer. He spent his entire life in Bologna. He was a pupil of Ottavio Vernizzi whom he succeeded as second organist at S Petronio in 1649, being promoted to first organist ten years later. In December 1661 he was summarily dismissed following a vitriolic attack on the maestro di cappella Maurizio Cazzati, circulated anonymously as the Dialogo fatto tra un maestro ed un discepolo desideroso d'approfittare nel contrappunto. While Gaspari attributed this work to Arresti, it is now considered unlikely that it is by him. Matters came to a head when Arresti published his Messa e Vespro dell Beata Virgine (1663), including the Kyrie of Cazzati's Messe e salmi a 5 voci (1655) liberally marked with alleged errors. Cazzati was forced to reply in the lengthy Risposta alle opposizoni fatte dal Signor Giulio Cesare Arresti nella Lettera al Lettore posta nell'opera sua musicale...

Article

Josef-Horst Lederer

(b S Vito al Tagliamento, March 10, 1597; d S Vito al Tagliamento, June 8, 1675). Italian composer and organist. There is no evidence that he was related to Carlo Arrigoni. From 1632 to 1638 he is recorded as an organist in the Hofkapelle, Vienna. After 1638 he does not seem to have been active in Vienna, although his link with the Viennese imperial court continued: Leopold I was the dedicatee of his three-act festa teatrale, Gli amori di Alessandro Magno e di Rosane. From 1638 he was in his home town of S Vito al Tagliamento and in Venice, and from 1652 to 1655 he directed an opera company in Udine. According to Gerber he was a member of the Accademia Fileleutera in Venice, with the academic name of ‘L’Affettuoso’, although that need not signify that he lived there. He may also have had connections with the court of Duke Carlo II of Mantua, since he dedicated his volume of ...

Article

Almonte Howell

(b southern France; fl 1609–14). Spanish liturgist of French birth. A Dominican friar, educated at the monastery at Saint-Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume, Provence, he served as cantor in a number of houses of his order in France, Aragon and Castile, including S Pablo at Valladolid and finally S María de Atocha in Madrid. He was commissioned to prepare a new simplified processional for the Spanish Dominicans, Processionarium secundum morem almi ordinis Praedicatorum S.P.N. Dominici (Madrid, 1609), which contains information on past chant manuals of the order, and the rubrics and music for the special services involving processions. Its music was badly garbled by the printer. Artufel’s second work, Modo de rezar las horas canónicas conforme al rezo de los Frayles Predicadores … con un Arte de canto llano y con la entonación de los hymnos y sus rúbricas (Valladolid, 1614), is in three parts with separate paginations. The first, a ceremonial for the Office, is chiefly an extract in translation from the Dominican Ordinary but with some interesting added material on the use of the organ; the second part contains the hymn intonations; the third is a manual on chant consisting of 23 chapters on the rudiments of music (notation, solmization, intervals, modes) and a collection of examples. The bulk of the technical material is taken verbatim from the ...

Article

Karl-Ernst Bergunder

(b Stettin [now Szczecin], Dec 29, 1654; d Jena, Dec 13, 1732). German composer and violinist. He was taught the violin by his father, a Stettin town musician, and in 1668 he received composition lessons from Johann Theile. He studied with J.H. Schmelzer in Vienna in 1676 and 1677 and in the latter year became a violinist in the Hofkapelle at Zeitz, where he remained until the Kapelle was disbanded in 1682. In the following year he became Konzertmeister in the Hofkapelle at Merseburg. There he enjoyed friendly relations with the Hofkapellmeister, David Pohle, whom he had known when he held a similar position at Zeitz from 1680 to 1682. In 1695 Aschenbrenner returned to Zeitz, where he was director of music until, in 1713, he went back to Merseburg as Hofkapellmeister. He still, however, retained an honorary title from Zeitz as ‘Kapellmeister von Haus aus’, though this cannot have continued beyond ...

Article

Gary R. Boye

(b probably in Reggio nell’Emilia, fl 1674–6). Italian composer and guitarist, ancestor of Bonifazio Asioli. He is known by two collections of guitar music, both printed by Giacomo Monti: Primi scherzi di chitarra (Bologna, 1674/R) and Concerti armonici per la chitarra spagnuola op.3 (Bologna, 1676; 3 ed. in Chilesotti, 1886; 1 also ed. in Chilesotti, 1921). The second book is more varied in content than the first, containing, besides the typical dances, two arias, two capriccios, a prelude and a sonata with fugue. Each piece is dedicated to a member of the Parma Collegio dei Nobili, where Asioli apparently served as guitar instructor. There are four pieces that spell out the dedicatees' names in alfabeto chords (where letters of the alphabet designate fingering positions), a device first used by Corbetta. Asioli's music combines strummed chords and pizzicato notes in a competent, if rather conservative style, with little use of ...

Article

Robert L. Kendrick

[Agata]

(b ?Pavia, c1590; d Lomello, after 1618). Italian composer and nun. Assandra alluded to Pavia as her birthplace in the dedication of her surviving motet book, Motetti à due, & tre voci, op.2 (Milan, 1609³, 1 ed. in Bowers, 1996), which is dedicated to G.B. Biglia, the Bishop of Pavia. Her musical talents were noted early by the publisher Lomazzo in the dedication to G.P. Cima’s Partito de ricercari, e canzoni alla francese (RISM 1606¹5). She received instruction from the German Catholic exile Benedetto Re (or Reggio), maestro at Pavia Cathedral, who dedicated a piece to her in 1607. Her op.1 (probably before 1608) is lost, but two motets, Ave verum corpus and Ego flos campi, which survive untexted in a German organ tablature, are probably from that volume ( D-Rtt ; ed. C. Johnson: Organ music by Women Composers before 1800...

Article

José Quitin

(fl 1622–30). Flemish composer and organist. The title-page of his first publication shows that in 1622 he was chaplain and organist of the collegiate church of St Paul, Liège. From 17 October 1623 he held a benefice at Liège Cathedral. On the title-page of his volume of 1626 he is described as chaplain of the cathedral, and he is mentioned in documents in the cathedral archives dated 4 August 1628 and 20 April 1630. He was replaced as beneficiary before 1639. As a composer he is known by two books of motets, Prolusiones musicae, for two to five voices and continuo (Douai, 1622, incomplete), and Tomus secundus Prolusionum musicarum, for three to six voices and continuo (Douai, 1626). They are similar on all counts. Ath was brought up in the polyphonic tradition, but he included continuo parts and made each voice equally important. The motets begin with strict imitation and continue with freer imitative textures. The motifs are generally short, and there are some roulades, often in dotted rhythm. As a disciple of the Jesuits he took special care over the correct accentuation of the words. His works most probably influenced those of Hodemont and the young Du Mont....

Article

Alice Ray Catalyne

(b c?1657; d Puebla, Mexico, March 1726). Mexican composer, probably of Spanish birth. He became a priest, and by 1695 ranked among the leading musicians at Mexico City Cathedral. In 1710 he officially protested against the selection of Zumaya as substitute for the ailing choirmaster Salazar, noting that he himself was considerably older than Zumaya, and indeed had substituted for Salazar in 1703. He departed soon after for Puebla, where he won the post of maestro de capilla on 15 January 1712, serving until his death. The Biblioteca Palafoxiana there contains texts of 12 sets of villancicos printed between 1715 and 1722 (and an undated one) and sung at Puebla Cathedral with music composed by Atienza. His surviving liturgical compositions reveal a skilled composer with a fluent command of polyphonic techniques. He adhered to the Spanish tradition in generally employing the prima pratica.

Article

(d London, bur. Feb 12, 1671). English violinist and composer. He became one of the king's band of violins in 1660 and served until his death early in 1671. His widow Sarah (whom he had married in 1639) was in receipt of his back pay for several years thereafter. Although John Playford did not publish any of his songs, several, mostly drinking-songs, survive (in GB-Lbl Add.29396, F-Pn Rés.2489, US-NYp Drexel 4275 and particularly Drexel 4041). One source, Drexel 4041, may have originated close to the composer as one of a circle of musicians having connections with the City of London. The fact that it is an important source of pre-Commonwealth playsongs could indicate that the composer was a theatre musician; his settings of Davenant's This lady ripe and fair and fresh may have been made for the original production of The Just Italian (1629; one of four songs by Atkins in ...

Article

Diana Poulton

revised by Robert Spencer

(fl 1622; d ?Ross, Herefordshire, c1640). English lutenist and composer. In his book of ayres Attey described himself as ‘Gentleman, and Practitioner in Musicke’, while in the dedication to the Earl and Countess of Bridgwater he wrote that his songs were for ‘the best part composed under your roofe while I had the happiness to attend the service of those worthy and incomparable young Ladies your daughters’. John Egerton (1579–1649), Earl of Bridgwater and his wife Frances, daughter of Ferdinando, Earl of Derby, lived at Ashridge, in the parish of Little Gaddesden, Hertfordshire. Fellowes (1921) gave Attey's death date as above but the source for his statement is not known: Ross parish registers do not survive from before 1662.

Attey's only publication, The First Booke of Ayres for four voices and lute (London, 1622/R; ed. in EL, 2nd ser., ix, 1967...

Article

Robert Lamar Weaver

In 

Article

James R. Anthony

( bc 1656; d Paris, 1704). French singer . She sang at a young age in the musical establishment of Philip, Duke of Orleans, and first appeared on stage as Diana in Les amours de Diane et d’Endymion by Sablières at Versailles (1671). Her performance impressed Robert Cambert, who cast her as Phyllis in his pastorale Les peines et les plaisirs de l’amour (1671). She created six leading roles in Lully’s operas: Aeglé in Thésée (1675), Sangaride in Atys (1676), Io in Isis (1677), Philonoé in Bellérophon (1679), the title role in Proserpine (1680) and Andromeda in Persée (1682). She assumed such a ‘prodigious size’ that she retired in 1684 because ‘she could not walk and appeared toute ronde’ (F. Parfaict: Histoire de l’Academie royale de musique, MS, 7741, F-Pn ).

Aubry fanned the antagonism between Lully and Guichard, her former lover. She told Lully that Guichard plotted his murder by asking her brother to mix arsenic in Lully’s tobacco. There followed a bitter trial lasting nearly three years....

Article

John H. Baron

(b Pontoise [now Cergy-Pontoise], c1592; d Paris, March 22, 1660). French composer. The son of a wine merchant, Auget had the money and social connections to obtain quickly a musical position worthy of his talents. He found favour with Jean-François de Gondi, Abbé of St Autin and doyen of Notre Dame, and through him began his career at court. He served as master of the abbé’s music and at various times as singer and master to the queen, the queen mother and the king. On 13 January 1625 he became surintendant de la musique de la chambre du roi, a post he shared with Antoine and, later, J.B. Boësset. By 1638 he was enobled and living on a comfortable pension, but he still held his position as surintendant in 1654 when he participated in the coronation of Louis XIV. Contrary to statements by Prunières and others his daughter did not marry Jean de Cambefort, his successor as ...

Article

Thomas Walker and Norbert Dubowy

(b Murano, Venice; fl 1652–1708). Italian librettist. He wrote some 50 librettos, including a few adaptations. Until 1687 he seems to have lived mainly in Venice (except for a brief sojourn in 1659 at the Viennese court), where he was a member of the Accademia Delfica and the Accademia degli Imperfetti, both of them probably offshoots of the famous Accademia degli Incogniti, among whose members there were many librettists. From 1688 to 1694 he was employed by the Duke of Parma; during this period he produced about a dozen dramatic works, all set by the court composer Bernardo Sabadini. Most of his subsequent librettos were written for Venice and other cities of the Venetian republic. He occasionally revised texts of other librettists, including Moniglia and Morselli. His works are whimsical and at times bizarre transformations of the most disparate historical and mythological source material. They reflect the evolution of Venetian taste (to which he admittedly pandered) from the libretto’s first point of stability to the era of Arcadian reform....

Article

(fl 1691–6). Italian singer. She is described in contemporary documents as ‘torinese’, although that may refer to her service in the court of Turin; she is also described as ‘ musica di camera to His Royal Highness of Savoy’ in the libretto of La pace fra Tolomeo e Seleuco by C. F. Pollarolo (1691, Piacenza). A singer of no particular distinction, she usually took second female parts. Among the most important productions in which she appeared were those at the Teatro S Giovanni Grisostomo in Venice, where she sang with the best singers of the time: G. F. Tosi’s L’incoronazione di Serse (1691) and C. F. Pollarollo’s Ibraim sultano, Onorio in Roma (both 1692), Rosimonda and Ercole in Cielo (both 1696) and L’Ulisse sconosciuto (1698). By 1695 Aureli had married the librettist Pietro d’Averara. She seems not to have been related to the Bolognese family of singers of the same name....

Article

[Arthur]

(b ?Amiens, c1590; d Paris, c1656). French composer and singer. Although his birthplace is not known, there were families bearing this name in Amiens; a member of one, a relative of the composer, served as mayor of the town. Aux-Cousteaux studied under Jean de Bournonville at the choir school of the collegiate church at Saint Quentin. From 1613 to 1627 he sang haute-contre in Louis XIII's chapel. A period at Noyon followed about which little is known. He succeeded Bournonville as maître de musique both at Saint Quentin (1631) and Amiens (c 1632–4). On 24 June 1634 he relinquished this more lucrative post for that of a ‘clerk’ haute-contre at the Ste Chapelle in Paris. In spite of a recalcitrant and quarrelsome nature (‘scandalous, insolent and disrespectful acts committed daily during the Office’), Aux-Cousteaux advanced rapidly and by 1643 was maître de musique...

Article

Eleanor Selfridge-Field

(b Rimini, c1600; d Rimini, c1678). Italian composer and author. He was a priest and maestro di cappella of Rimini Cathedral. From 1649 he was librarian of the Biblioteca Gambalunghiana, Rimini. He wrote literary and historical works; all his music dates from his early years. He had some connection with the pseudonymous composer Accademico Bizzarro Capriccioso, to each of whose opp.1 and 2 (1620–21) he contributed a madrigal, one for two voices, the other for three. As a composer he is known mainly for three volumes of sacred music written mostly in a simple style suited to the needs of a provincial maestro di cappella: 14 eight-voice psalms with organ continuo, op.1, a book of four- and five-voice concertato masses, op.2 (incomplete), and four masses and two motets with organ continuo, op.3 (all Venice, 1623). The description ‘a tre voci variate’ of op.3 refers to an unusual arrangement of partbooks – one each for the highest, middle and lowest voices....

Article

Josef-Horst Lederer

(fl 1657). Italian theorist and ?composer. His treatise Regole di musica, divise in cinque trattati (Rome, 1657) indicates that in 1657 he was Predicatore in the Minori Osservanti – an order of strict Franciscans – in the province of Terra Lavoro. In some reference works he is mentioned as a composer of lute music, but there are no known compositions. The Regole di musica deals not only with music but with a range of other subjects as well, including astronomy and astrology. However, Avella’s theories and views failed to impress his contemporaries and fellow theorists: G.F. Beccatelli, for instance, in his Annotazioni (MS, I-Bc ) on the Regole, rightly accused Avella of ignorance of musical history in attributing the Guidonian Hand not only to Boethius but also to Plato and Aristotle, and in making Guido of Arezzo a contemporary of Pope Gregory I.

J.-H. Lederer: Lorenzo Penna und seine Kontrapunkttheorie...