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Sarah Adams Hoover

(b Little Fork, MN, Nov 10, 1942). American organologist and curator. He received a BFA in music education (1964) and MM in music literature (1968) from the University of South Dakota and a PhD in musicology from West Virginia University (...

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Susan Feder

(b New York, NY, Sept 22, 1899; d Plainfield, NJ, May 23, 1979). American soprano and folklorist. She studied voice in New York with Cesare Stunai, Henry Russell, and Katherine Opdycke, and made her debut in 1929, as Gounod’s Marguerite, with the Quebec Opera Company, Montreal. During the 1930s, while continuing to sing opera in New York, Philadelphia, and elsewhere (her roles included Aida, Tosca, and Carmen), she became interested in American folk music and folklore and began collecting songs, particularly from residents of the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and the Zuni Indians of New Mexico, about both of which she lectured and wrote articles. Her recital programs (from ...

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Israel J. Katz

(b Ciudad Rodrigo, Feb 3, 1868; d Salamanca, June 13, 1928). Spanish folklorist, organist and composer. His talent as a musician was nurtured during his early childhood. After serving as an organist at a local church, Ledesma became organist at the cathedral in Ciudad Rodrigo (...

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Peter Wollny

(b Berlin, June 19, 1761; d Berlin, May 11, 1854). German harpsichordist, music collector and patron. She was a daughter of the Jewish banker Daniel Itzig (1723–99) and great-aunt of Mendelssohn. On 2 July 1783 she married the banker Samuel Salomon Levy (...

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Paula Morgan and Bonna J. Boettcher

(b Philadelphia, PA, Oct 22, 1896; d Baltimore, MD, Sept 19, 1989). American collector of and writer on American popular music. He received the BA in economics (1918) from Johns Hopkins University, and for 40 years was a manufacturer of men’s hats. At the same time he began amassing a collection of more than 30,000 pieces of American sheet music from the late 18th century onward. Following his retirement, he continued collecting and made significant contributions to the scholarly literature of sheet music. One of the most significant private collections of its kind in the United States, the Lester S. Levy Collection of Sheet Music includes songs for political campaigns and presidential inaugurations, humorous songs, and items in many different popular styles. Levy’s material, now held by the Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University, has been used by publishers, students, and musicologists (...

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David Johnson

(b Denholm, Roxburghshire, Sept 8, 1775; d Batavia [now Jakarta], Indonesia, Aug 28, 1811). Scottish antiquarian and folksong collector. He was a powerful force in Edinburgh's intellectual life from the mid-1790s until his departure for India in 1802. His two outstanding contributions to Scottish folksong scholarship were in helping Walter Scott to collect material for the ...

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Paula Morgan

(b Chicago, Sept 19, 1944). American organologist and curator. He was educated at Northwestern University, Evanston (BMus 1966), and at King's College, University of London (MMus 1968), studying with Thurston Dart. He then returned to the USA to study for the PhD at Chicago University with Howard Mayer Brown and Edward Lowinsky (...

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Luise Eitel Peake

A circle or club of people dedicated to the cultivation of popular song. Examples are the ‘Mittwochskränzchen’ (‘Cour d’amour’) that met during the early 1800s in Goethe’s Weimar home, the Stägemann circle in Berlin, 1815–18, that included the young poet Wilhelm Müller, the Dresden Liederkreis (‘Dichtertee’), ...

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M.A. Lobanov

(b Brest-Litovsk [now Brest, Belarus], Dec 28, 1853/Jan 9, 1854; d Moscow, Jan 24, 1919). Russian polyphonic folksong collector. After receiving professional training as a singer, she performed in operatic productions in Vienna, Budapest, London, Paris and Moscow (1882–3, Bol′shoy). She also worked clandestinely for an illegal revolutionary publishing organization, translating the works of Marx and Engels (...

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Walter Blankenburg

(b Schneeberg, Saxony, April 4, 1515; d Königsberg, Nov 27, 1585). German jurist and humanist. He was one of the children of a Saxon mine inspector. In 1527 he went to school and later to university in Leipzig; in 1535 he took the Master of Arts degree and remained as a teacher at the university until ...

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Loyal Jones

(b Mars Hill, NC, Mar 21, 1882; d Asheville, NC, Sept 4, 1973). American folk-music collector and performer. He played the fiddle and sang as a child, but had no formal musical training. His first job, as a traveling fruit-tree salesman in the mountain areas of the Carolinas, Georgia, and Tennessee, brought him into contact with the Appalachian folk-music tradition. He learned folklore methodology and observed professional standards of collection; in order to preserve the culture he organized the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival in Asheville, North Carolina, in ...

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Jennifer Spencer

(b Hrynky, nr Kremenchug, Poltava district, 10/March 22, 1842; d Kiev, 24 Oct/Nov 6, 1912). Ukrainian composer, pianist, conductor and folksong collector. He was first taught the piano by his mother, but was taken to Kiev at the age of nine to have lessons with Panochini and to study theory with Nejnkevič. He attended the Gymnasium at Khar′kiv and then took a course in natural sciences, first at the university there, and then at the University of Kiev (...

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Carole Pegg

(b Salford, Lancs, 1915; d Oct 22, 1989). English folk singer, songwriter and collector. He inherited a large repertory of traditional Scottish songs from his parents, William Miller and Betsy Hendry. During the early 1930s he wrote satirical songs. In 1934 he married Joan Littlewood, with whom he formed several theatres, the most famous of which was Theatre Workshop. He changed his name during the Lallans movement in Scotland in the 1940s. He married the dancer Jean Newlove in ...

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Robert J. Bruce

( b Cologne, bap. Jan 15, 1730; d Oxford, Dec 12, 1812). German violinist, collector of national melodies and watercolour artist . Son of a watchmaker, he sang in the choir of Cologne Cathedral for six years from 1744. By 1751 he was in Nancy and in about ...

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Rodney Hall

(b Melbourne, April 21, 1915; d Brisbane, April 19, 1985). Australian folksong collector and poet. After graduating in modern languages from Cambridge University, Manifold became active in Baroque music circles in London. He served with the intelligence corps during World War II. His first book of poems was published in New York in ...

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( b Cartagena, Oct 24, 1863; d St Blasien, Baden, Feb 27, 1929). Spanish composer, folklorist and music critic . His father was a captain of a marine infantry battalion, and he began his musical training under a military bandsman in his father's regiment. In the early 1880s, while stationed in Madrid as a second lieutenant, he began to study harmony, counterpoint, fugue and composition with Ruperto Chapí, remaining his sole disciple until Chapí's death in ...

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Arthur Searle

(b nr Leeds, June 24, 1836; d London, Nov 21, 1903). English collector and writer on music. From a Yorkshire industrial family, he sang in the choir of Leeds Parish Church under S.S. Wesley. He went to London in 1861 to pursue his interest in art, racket games and music, about all of which he wrote. One of the principal contributors to the first edition of Grove's ...

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( b Cholula, Mexico, Jan 27, 1894; d Mexico City, Oct 27, 1964). Mexican folklorist . He was born of a musical family (his great-grandfather was an organist, his grandfather a tenor and his father a piano teacher) and he began his studies at home at an early age. When his family moved to Mexico City in ...

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Patricia Brown

(b Holbrook, NSW, Jan 17, 1920). Australian folksong collector, folklorist and oral historian . In Sydney he came into contact with other enthusiasts for the collection and performance of Australian traditional bush songs and verse, and in 1954 he formed the original Bushwhackers band, in which he played the button accordion, as a means of ensuring performance of many of the songs and dance tunes he had collected. Also in ...

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Christiane Spieth-Weissenbacher

( b Colombes, July 5, 1884; d Paris, May 10, 1974). French collector . Having taken the degree in English literature at the Sorbonne (1904), he became an industrialist. When he was 15 he began an eclectic collection of considerable musical interest. Its most unusual section consists of drawings and engravings relating to music and musicians; its most important part comprises printed scores from the 17th century to the 19th, especially 18th-century instrumental music, chiefly French. Meyer always opened his collection to interested students. He was treasurer of the Société Française de Musicologie from ...