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Albert  

Philip J. Kass

Family of violin makers and dealers. John Albert (b Liel, Baden, Germany, 24 June 1809; d Philadelphia, PA, 2 Jan 1900) began as an engineer and inventor. He came to New York from Freiburg, Germany, in 1854 as a refugee of the 1848...

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Nicholas Shackleton

(b Brussels, April 26, 1816; d Brussels, May 11, 1890). Belgian woodwind instrument maker. He is known chiefly for his clarinets. His three sons Jean-Baptiste (-Gustav) (1845–99), Jacques (-Emile) (1849–1918) and Joseph-Eugène (known as E.J. Albert; 1860–1931) were also woodwind instrument makers specializing in clarinets. Eugène Albert is recorded as a maker from ...

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Jaak Liivoja-Lorius

(fl Milan, c1737–63). Italian violin maker. His violins are roughly reminiscent of Giovanni Grancino’s model although without its symmetry. The craftsmanship rarely approaches any degree of refinement, though the tonal qualities invariably rise above these limitations, and authentic examples in good condition command respectable prices. The varnish on the better instruments is a reddish-brown, most of the others being a clear yellow-brown. Alberti took over Grancino’s shop, which is acknowledged on his printed labels: ‘Ferdinando Alberti in Contrada/Larga di Milano a Segno della/Corona F. l’Anno 17 –’ or ‘Ferdinando Alberti fece in Milano/nella Contrada del pesce al Segno/della Corona l’Anno 17–’. (R. Vannes: ...

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Hans Klotz

(b Stuttgart, May 12, 1938; d 1984). German organ builder. Born into a family of organ builders once active in the vicinity of Waldhut, he was trained by the firm of Walcker, followed by Rieger in Schwarzach (Vorarlberg), for whom he didSeit 1960...

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William Waterhouse

( b 1872; d Switzerland, Jan 1938). Italian flute maker, flautist and composer . He was a flautist at La Scala, Milan, from 1897. In 1910 he invented his ‘Albisiphon’, a vertically-held, Boehm-system bass flute in C, with a T-shaped head, which he described in his ...

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A bass flute invented by Abelardo Albisi in 1910. See Flute, §II, 3, (v).

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Alboka  

Sabin Bikandi Belandia

Basque double-pipe hornpipe similar to the pibgorn and the Scottish stockhorn. The idioglot single reeds are cut into small, removable cane tubes that fit into the upper ends of the parallel cane pipes. The pipes share a cowhorn bell and a second horn at the upper end that serves as a wind cap. A decoratively carved wooden yoke supports both the pipes and the horns. Circular breathing is used. Old instruments vary in size and tuning. In the late 20th century the scale was standardized, producing in the five-holed left-hand pipe the notes ...

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Italian 16th-century cleric who invented the Phagotum.

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Cynthia Adams Hoover

American firm of piano makers. Charles Albright (Albrecht by 1864) is listed in Philadelphia city directories from 1863. He was in partnership with Frederick Riekes (as Albrecht & Riekes, 1864–5), with Riekes and Richard T. Schmidt (as Albrecht, Riekes & Schmidt, 1866–74), and with Riekes and Edmund Wolsieffer (as Albrecht & Co., ...

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Cynthia Adams Hoover

American firm of piano makers. Charles Albright (Albrecht by 1864) is listed in Philadelphia city directories from 1863. He was in partnership with Frederick Riekes (as Albrecht & Riekes, 1864–5), with Riekes and Richard T. Schmidt (as Albrecht, Riekes & Schmidt, 1866–74), and with Riekes and Edmund Wolsieffer (as Albrecht & Co., ...

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Cynthia Adams Hoover

(b Germany, 1759/60; d Montgomery, PA, June 28, 1848). American piano maker of German birth. He was active in Philadelphia as a piano maker by the 1790s, probably arriving there on the ship Hamburgh in October 1785. (His marriage to Maria Fuchs is listed in the records of St Michael′s and Zion′s Lutheran Church, Philadelphia, for ...

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Cynthia Adams Hoover

(b Hanover, Jan 6, 1788; d Philadelphia, PA, March 1843). American piano maker of German birth. He immigrated to the United States, arriving in Philadelphia on 17 October 1822, and from 1823 to 1824 ran a business there at 106 St John Street; from ...

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Cynthia Adams Hoover

(b Hanover, Jan 6, 1788; d Philadelphia, March 1843). American piano maker of German birth. He emigrated to the USA, arriving in Philadelphia on 17 October 1822, and from 1823 to 1824 ran a business there at 106 St John Street; from 1830 to 1843...

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Jaak Liivoja-Lorius and Sylvette Milliot

( b Mirecourt, April 28, 1765; d Paris, 1843). French violin maker . One of the third generation of a Mirecourt family of violin makers, he settled in Paris in 1785, firstly at 16 rue des Arcis, moving to 30 rue de Bussy about 1807...

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Alele  

Notched flute of the Edo/Bini people of Nigeria.

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Alembic  

Tony Bacon

American manufacturer of electric bass guitars, six-string electric guitars, preamps, and related accessories, located in Santa Rosa, California. The recording engineer and Ampex designer Ron Wickersham and his wife, the painter Susan Frates, began the company in 1969 as a consulting firm to improve performance and recording audio quality for such bands as the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, and Crosby Stills Nash & Young. They soon moved to premises in San Francisco and while continuing to provide audio services to touring bands, opened a repair facility, recording studio, and retail store. The firm then turned to providing new components for guitars and basses, designing new pickups, and remodelling instruments. Alembic electronics and pickups were first installed in David Crosby’s 12-string Guild guitar and Phil Lesh’s (Grateful Dead) psychedelic SG bass; next, Lesh’s and Jack Casady’s (Jefferson Airplane) hollow-body basses were retrofitted with new low-impedance pickups and ‘active electronics’, a system that uses a built-in preamp to boost the volume and widen the frequency range. Alembic also renovated Bobby Weir’s and Jerry Garcia’s guitars. This work led the firm, which included Owsley (‘The Bear’) Stanley, the guitar builder Rick Turner, and designer Geoff Gould, to produce its own Standard Series I and II electric guitars and basses, promoted from the mid-1970s by the bassist Stanley Clarke, among other well-known performers....

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Ałepa  

Laurence Libin

Term for various instruments among the Choctaw people of Mississippi, USA. Meanings of the term were probably extended to cover non-native instruments by Rev. Cyrus Byington, a 19th-century missionary concerned with translating the Bible into Choctaw. Ałepa chito denotes a large drum or bass fiddle, ...

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Barbara Owen

French firm of reed organ makers. It was founded in 1829 by Jacob Alexandre (b Paris, 1804; d Paris, 11 June 1876) for the manufacture of accordions; in 1834 he exhibited a small reed organ (two sets of reeds) in Paris. With the purchase in ...

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Guy Oldham and Pierre Hardouin

In 

See Thierry family

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John M. Schechter and J. Richard Haefer

Rattle of Ecuador and the Valle de Tenza of Boyacá, Colombia. It resembles the modern rain stick and is made from a tube of cane (Gaudua angustifolia) 5 to 8 cm in diameter and 20 to 25 cm long, into which are placed seeds, stones, or shot pellets. Small sticks pierce the tube diametrically to keep the seeds in place and increase their vibrations. It might have two series of slits cut parallel to the length in both the top and bottom portions of the cane. It can be shaken vertically or horizontally. The ...