121-140 of 947 results  for:

  • 19th c. /Romantic (1800-1900) x
Clear all

Article

Nicholas Michael Butler

(b St. Mary Newington, Surrey, England, 1774; d Charleston, SC, Oct 1, 1802). British singer and actress. Broadhurst was performing on the New York stage as early as 1797, and in subsequent years participated in theatrical productions in several cities along the Atlantic coast, singing popular airs and in English operas. Contemporaries praised the quality of her voice and her vocal technique, but not the attractiveness of her person. Broadhurst spent the last year of her life in Charleston, South Carolina, where she arrived with a theatrical group in the autumn of 1801. During her tenure there she performed at the Charleston Theatre, Vauxhall Garden, and at the exclusive subscription concerts of the St. Cecilia Society. She succumbed to “stranger’s fever” (yellow fever) and was buried at St. Philip’s Church. An obituary noted that Broadhurst was survived by her widowed mother, whom she had supported since her 14th year....

Article

( fl 1776–1807). Italian bass . He was a singer of buffo parts. His first known appearances were in Venice (1776–7), Reggio Emilia (1779) and Warsaw (1780–81). In 1782–4 he was in St Petersburg, where he created Figaro in Il barbiere di Siviglia and Ernesto in ...

Article

David Cummings

(b Leiden, July 24, 1878; d Berlin, Sept 22, 1957). Dutch baritone . He studied with Julius Stockhausen in Frankfurt and made his début in Hamburg in 1901 (Das Nachtlager in Granada by Kreutzer). After five years in Hamburg he moved to the Berlin Hofoper, where his most notable roles were Amonasro, Amfortas, Posa and Telramund. His only English appearance was as Papageno at Drury Lane (...

Article

Dominique-René De Lerma

revised by Valeria Wenderoth

(b Dover, NH, 1845; d Boston, MA, Jan 1924). American soprano. After singing in local churches in Dover from 1865 to 1874, she studied voice with Mrs. J. Rametti and Professor O’Neill in Boston, where she performed in several recitals. In 1876 she made her New York début at the Steinway Hall. The same year in Boston she sang at the Centennial Musical Festival, organized and conducted fifty girls in the operetta Laila, the Fairy Queen, and married Lieutenant Charles L. Mitchell. After attending the School of Vocal Arts, she studied and graduated at New England Conservatory in 1879. For the following nine years she was music director at Bloomfield Street Church, and in 1882 she made her début in Philadelphia. From 1882 to 1885 she was “Prima donna soprano” with James Bergen’s Star Concerts when Marie Selika also performed as a star. In 1886 she founded the Nellie Brown Mitchell Concert Company, and from ...

Article

Andrew Lamb

(b Valencia, c 1870). Spanish soprano . The daughter of actors, she was a zarzuela chorister from an early age and at 12 deputized in Chueca and Valverde’s Cádiz. She progressed through zarzuela and operetta roles to become a member of the company of the Teatro Eslava in Madrid, where she created the title role in Chapí’s El tambor de Granaderos (1894). From 1896 she was a member of the company of the Teatro Apolo, where she created the leading soprano roles in Giménez’s Las mujeres (1896), Chapí’s Las bravías (1896), La revoltosa (1897) and El puñao de rosas (1902), Chueca’s Agua, azucarillos y aguardiente (1897), López Torregrosa’s La fiesta de San Antón (1898) and Serrano and Valverde’s El perro chico (1905). She was noted as a versatile interpreter with a fine soprano voice....

Article

(b Courtenay, Loiret, May 6, 1851; d Paris, Feb 10, 1925). French singer and songwriter. He began as a chanson writer and performer in cafés-concerts in Paris, but in the 1880s gained renown as a critic of social injustice through his performances first at the Chat Noir, then at his own cabaret Le Mirliton, where he created the semblance of low life for a mostly bourgeois audience. He published many of his own songs in a journal named after the cabaret. His singing style and lyrics had a lasting influence on the 20th-century chanson. He continued performing into the 1920s but was more active after 1901 as a writer of novels and plays. Many of Bruant’s cabaret acts were published as Dans la rue: chansons et monologues (Paris, 1889–1909), Chansons et monologues (Paris, 1896–7) and Sur la route: chansons et monologues (Courtenay, 1897); a collection was edited as ...

Article

Nicola Lucarelli

(b Fratta [now Umbertide], Feb 28, 1758; d Fratta, Jan 17, 1821). Italian castrato soprano . He studied in Fratta and then in Urbania with Francesco Paciotti. His début was in Fratta in 1772 playing female roles and he first sang as primo uomo in Treviso in 1780. He sang also in Rome, Florence, Bologna, Milan, Naples and other important Italian towns. From 1787 to 1790 he was in St Petersburg as primo uomo of the Italian Theatre, at a salary of 4000 roubles. In 1793 he sang in London and in the same year Ercole III d’Este appointed him virtuoso da camera in Modena. His last performance was in Bologna in 1796. The reporter of the Morning Herald (6 February 1793) said about him: ‘Bruni, the new man, is the best singer of his kind within our remembrance, being distinguished from the rest by uniting to their softness and clearness of tone greater strength than they were master of’. On January 26, 2013 a theater in Umbertide (ex Oplas) was named after Bruni....

Article

Boris Semeonoff

(b Moscow, 15/March 27, 1824; d St Petersburg, 15/Oct 27, 1875). Russian tenor . He was a member of a distinguished musical family: his father, Pyotr Alexandrovich Bulakhov (?1793–1835) and elder brother, Pyotr Petrovich Bulakhov (1822–85) were both tenors, and the younger Pyotr’s daughter, Yevgeniya Zbruyeva, achieved fame as the leading operatic contralto of her day. Following his operatic début in St Petersburg in 1849, Pavel Bulakhov embarked on a versatile career that embraced the spoken theatre as well as Russian and Italian opera. His principal roles included Almaviva, Lyonel (Martha) Sobinin (A Life for the Tsar) and Finn (Ruslan and Lyudmila). In 1856 he created the role of the Prince in Dargomïzhsky’s Rusalka, partnered by his wife Anis’ya Alexandrovna Bulakhova (née Lavrova, 1831–1920) in the role of Natasha. Like her husband, Bulakhova was particularly noted for her appearances in Glinka’s operas: apart from their creators, Mariya Stepanova (...

Article

J.B. Steane

(b Prague, March 29, 1890; d Dresden, Feb 9, 1946). Czech baritone . He studied in Prague, where he made his début in 1915. After a season at Augsburg, he joined the company at Dresden and remained there from 1916 to the time of his death. He took the title role in two important premières: Busoni’s Doktor Faust (1925) and Hindemith’s Cardillac (1926). He was also involved in the ‘Verdi renaissance’ of those years, under Fritz Busch, singing such roles as Count di Luna in Il trovatore, Renato in Un ballo in maschera and Amonasro in Aida. At Bayreuth he appeared first in 1933, singing Kothner in Die Meistersinger and Klingsor in Parsifal and gaining highest praise for his Alberich. A guest artist in many other German cities, he also made some appearances in Austria, Hungary and Switzerland. Whatever his best qualities, they are not well represented on records, where the voice sounds ungainly and the style often faulty: his acting ability and carrying power created a more favourable impression in the theatre....

Article

Elizabeth Forbes

(b Holzkirchen, Upper Bavaria, Sept 27, 1871; d Gmund, April 19, 1945). German tenor . He studied in Frankfurt and with Kniese at Bayreuth, where he made his début in 1894, singing the First Knight of the Grail (Parsifal) and Heinrich der Schreiber (Tannhäuser). The same year he sang Siegfried at Nuremberg and in ...

Article

Desmond Shawe-Taylor

[Burrian, Carl]

(b Rousinov, Jan 12, 1870; d Senomaty, nr Prague, Sept 25, 1924). Bohemian tenor. He made his first appearance at Brno on 28 March 1891 as Jeník in Smetana’s The Bartered Bride; after singing the title role in the same composer’s Dalibor the next day, he was offered a contract. By 1899 he had reached the National Theatre in Prague, but he did not remain for long with that company, having by then become a Heldentenor much in demand in Germany. For over a decade before World War I Burian was a leading and much-admired tenor at the Dresden Opera, where he made a powerful impression in the première (1905) of Strauss’s Salome as Herod, repeating this role in the first productions of the opera in both New York and Paris in 1907. Wagner was the mainstay of his international repertory; as well as singing Tristan in the Hungarian première of ...

Article

Harold Rosenthal

(Arbrickle )

(b Toronto, July 12, 1876; d Pasadena, ca , Feb 19, 1970). Canadian bass . He studied at the RCM and in Paris with Duvernoy, and made his début at Montpellier in 1905 as Cardinal Brogni in La Juive. After appearances in Nice and The Hague he was engaged in ...

Article

(b Erie, PA, Dec 2, 1866; d Stamford, CT, Sept 12, 1949). American singer, composer, arranger, and music editor. His early music study included piano, voice, guitar, and bass viol. In January 1892 he won a scholarship at the National Conservatory of Music in New York. Among Conservatory faculty who influenced his career were Victor Herbert and Antonín Dvořák, director of the conservatory from September 1892 to April 1895. Burleigh became Dvořák’s copyist and librarian of the Conservatory orchestra, in which he played timpani and bass viol. He sang plantation songs and spirituals for Dvořák that he had learned from his grandfather, a former slave. Dvořák’s Symphony no.9 in E minor, “From the New World,” was written and premiered while Burleigh was at the Conservatory.

In New York Burleigh took his place among prominent African American singers such as soprano Sissieretta Jones (known as the Black Patti). In the years ...

Article

J.A. Fuller Maitland, H.C. Colles and Andrew Porter

(Ellen)

(b Southwick, Sussex, Feb 1, 1872; d North Stoke, Oxon, Jan 23, 1936). English contralto. She studied with Daniel Rootham in Bristol, and in 1890 gained a scholarship at the Royal College of Music, where she was a pupil of J.H. Blower. She made her début at the Royal Albert Hall as Ursula in Sullivan’s Golden Legend on 7 December 1892, and three days later sang the role of Orpheus in the RCM production of Gluck’s opera at the Lyceum Theatre. From that date her success was assured.

It was almost entirely a success of the concert platform, and later of her own platform: that is, in her own concerts, more or less of the ballad type, given all over the British Empire. She was also much in request for other concerts, and particularly for the English festivals. Elgar’s Sea Pictures (Norwich Festival, 1899) was written for her, and she made his ...

Article

J.B. Steane

(b Mariager, Dec 28, 1891; d Copenhagen, June 13, 1980). Danish bass baritone. He studied in Copenhagen, where he made his début in 1911 as Prince Gremin in Yevgeny Onegin. Developing a wide repertory, he became one of the most valued members of the Danish Opera, the resident Wotan, Sachs, Iago and Falstaff, and retired in ...

Article

Alexis Chitty

revised by Harold Rosenthal

(b Liège, Jan 31, 1827; d Maisons-Laffitte, May 23, 1885). Belgian soprano. She studied in Liège with Bouillon and in Brussels with Ferdinand Cabel and with L.J. Cabel, whom she married in 1847. She continued her studies at the Paris Conservatoire (1848–9) and made her début at the Opéra-Comique (1849) in Halévy’s Val d’Andorre, but failing to stir the Parisian critics or public, she accepted a three-year engagement in Brussels (1850). In 1853, after great successes in Brussels, Lyons and Strasbourg, she appeared in Paris at the Théâtre-Lyrique as Toinon in Adam’s Le bijou perdu. She repeated the role with the company the next year in London, where she was also acclaimed as Marie in La fille du régiment, among other roles. In 1856 she returned to the Opéra-Comique in Auber’s Manon Lescaut; she also created there the title role in Meyerbeer’s ...

Article

Desmond Shawe-Taylor

revised by Karen Henson

(b Decazeville, Aug 15, 1858; d Millau, Jan 6, 1942). French soprano. A pupil of Jules Puget, Mathilde Marchesi and Rosina Laborde, she made her début as Marguerite in Faust at the Théâtre de la Monnaie, Brussels, on 23 September 1881, and three years later appeared in Paris, mainly at the Opéra-Comique. In 1887 she was called to La Scala, Milan to create the heroine of Samara’s Flora mirabilis; but she did not achieve lasting success until a triumphant return in 1890 as Ophelia in Thomas’ Hamlet (with Battistini in the title role) was followed by appearances with Fernando de Lucia in Cavalleria rusticana in various Italian cities and with the same tenor in the première of Mascagni’s L’amico Fritz (31 October 1891, Rome). Calvé soon became one of the first favourites of the international public, especially in London and New York, where her Santuzza and above all her Carmen were considered incomparable. Although these parts were to dominate her repertory, Massenet wrote two roles for her, Anita in ...

Article

J.B. Steane

(b Venice, Nov 17, 1855; d Milan, May 31, 1927). Italian baritone. After a premature operatic début at the Dal Verme in Milan he became a cellist, playing first at La Scala and from 1884 with the Boston SO. In 1893 he returned successfully to singing, appearing first with Gustav Hinrichs’s company in Philadelphia and making his début at the Metropolitan the following year as Luna. His first conspicuous success was as Ford in the American première of ...

Article

Elizabeth Forbes

(b Parma, June 30, 1845; d Corcagno, nr Parma, Nov 22, 1896). Italian tenor. He studied with Griffini at the Regia Scuola di Canto in Parma, making his début there in 1863 as Oloferno Vitellozzo in Donizetti’s Lucrezia Borgia. Engaged to sing Manrico in Il trovatore in Odessa, he stayed three years in Russia, returning to Italy for further study with Lamperti in Milan. In 1871, after singing Gounod’s Faust, Don Ottavio and Gennaro (Lucrezia Borgia) at La Scala, he attracted wide attention when he sang Lohengrin at Bologna under Angelo Mariani, in the first Italian performance of Wagner’s opera. At La Scala he also sang the title role of Marchetti’s Ruy Blas and Lohengrin (1872–3). Having made his London début in 1872 at Drury Lane as Gennaro, in 1874 he sang Kenneth in the première of Balfe’s Il talismano. In 1875 he sang Faust in ...

Article

(b Brussels, Feb 5, 1779; d Brussels, April 24, 1848). Belgian singer, violinist and composer. His fame rests chiefly on the composition of La brabançonne, now the national anthem of Belgium, at the time of the revolution in 1830.

He began his career in the orchestra at the Théâtre de la Monnaie. Having developed a high tenor voice, he appeared on the stage, first in amateur performances, then professionally at Ghent and finally at La Monnaie. He studied further with Plantade, and during the ensuing 30 years sang in the chief towns of the Netherlands, Belgium and France, and made his farewell appearance at Ghent in 1828. He composed several operas, including Grotius (Amsterdam, 1808), Le passe-partout (Lyons, 1815) and L’heureux mensonge, a ballet Diane et Endymion, and much sacred and instrumental music, all of little importance. A requiem, four masses and a few other vocal pieces survive only in manuscript (...