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Raoul F. Camus

(b Scranton, PA, June 5, 1890; d New York, May 12, 1968). American bandmaster and publisher. He began studying the violin at the age of seven, and from 1905 to 1910 served in the United States Military Academy Band at West Point. He joined Shapiro, Bernstein & Company as a staff arranger and soon developed an excellent reputation that brought him work from many other publishers as well. He played with the 22nd (New York) Regiment Band under Victor Herbert, and then became leader (1914–17). He led a United States Navy band during the war, 1917–18. At one time he was leading six different bands in New York: the Fire Department Band (1920–58), Mecca Temple Shrine Band, Brooklyn Elks’ Band, Brooklyn Edison Band, Metropolitan Life Insurance Band and the 22nd Regiment Band, now renumbered the 102nd Engineer Regiment Band (1920–40). He operated his own music publishing and retail business from ...

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Hans-Martin Plesske

(b Leipzig, April 13, 1867; d Lörrach, May 9, 1957). German music publisher. He purchased several companies which formed the basis for his music publishing firm founded in 1893 in Leipzig. From 1906 he belonged to the Gewandhaus-Direktorium and was its chairman from 1920 to 1936. He provided 30 years of valuable stimulus for the development of Leipzig’s concert life. The publishing firm was especially concerned with the promotion of contemporary opera (Humperdinck, Leoncavallo, d’Albert), and by 1918 had published 30 music dramas. From 1898 Brockhaus promoted Hans Pfitzner’s work, publishing his operas and some orchestral, choral and chamber works, as well as 53 lieder and songs; he also published numerous compositions by Siegfried Wagner (Brockhaus considered himself a friend of both composers). The firm’s publications have consistently achieved a high artistic standard. In 1940 Brockhaus’s daughter Elisabeth Gruner took over the business, which suffered considerable war damage in ...

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Jon Newsom

(b New York, Dec 1, 1905; d New York, Dec 16, 1967). American editor and musicologist. He attended City College, New York, and studied music privately, but as a music scholar he was largely self-educated. His career in editing and music publishing began with his appointment as associate editor of the Musical Quarterly (1945–67) and manager of the publications department at G. Schirmer (1945–54); he subsequently became chairman of the publication committee of the American Musicological Society (1952–4), executive director of the American Section of RISM (1961–5) and music editor at W.W. Norton & Co., New York (1963–7). He also taught at Columbia University (lecturer 1946–52, associate professor 1959–62) and served as president of the American Musicological Society (1963–4). He received a Guggenheim Fellowship (1956) and a Ford Foundation Grant (1961)....

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Yolande de Brossard

(b Dompierre, bap. Sept 12, 1655; d Meaux, Aug 10, 1730). French priest, theorist, composer, lexicographer and bibliophile. He was descended from a family founded by Antoine de Brossard (b c1286), a natural son of Charles de Valois (son of Philip the Bold) and Hélène Broschart, daughter of the king's treasurer. Sébastien was the last of a family of glass-blowers from lower Normandy. He studied at the Jesuit college in Caen and then attended that city's famous university, studying philosophy for two years and theology for three. When he turned to music, therefore, he was self-taught; he studied the lute, copying and composing pieces for the instrument. He took minor orders in 1675 and became a sub-deacon the next year, but the date when he became a priest is not known, nor is the date of his arrival in Paris. He was living there in ...

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Ellen T. Harris

(b Los Angeles, April 13, 1930; d Venice, Feb 20, 1993). American musicologist and editor. He took the BA at Harvard College in 1951, then studied singing and conducting privately in Vienna. He returned to Harvard in 1953 for graduate studies with Piston, Gombosi, Merritt and John Ward and received the MA in 1954 and the PhD in 1959, with a dissertation under Ward on music in the French secular theatre of the Renaissance. While at Harvard he studied the flute privately with Georges Laurent of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and as a graduate student he conducted and performed both early and 20th-century music extensively in Boston and Cambridge. He first taught at Wellesley College, where he was instructor from 1958 to 1960. In 1960 he was appointed assistant professor at the University of Chicago, where he later became associate professor (1963), professor (1967) and chairman of the music department (...

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Ruth M. Wilson

(b Bolton, CT, May 13, 1746; d Smithfield, NY, 1815). American composer, singing master, and printer. He was prominent among the Connecticut composers who contributed many psalm and fuging-tunes to the repertory of 18th-century choral music. Brownson taught in several parts of Connecticut, and from 1775 to 1797 was mostly in Litchfield, Simsbury, West Simsbury, and New Hartford. He was associated with Asahel Benham, Timothy Swan, and Alexander Ely in the sale of music books. He settled in Peterboro, New York, sometime between 1797 and 1800.

Brownson’s compositions were first published in Law’s Select Harmony (Cheshire, CT, 1779). Brownson’s own Select Harmony, issued in four editions (probably in Hartford, CT) between 1783 and 1791, contained a large number of new pieces by Americans with “Author’s Names set over the tunes,” as well as 22 original works. The title page, engraved by Isaac Sanford, depicts a church choir arranged around three sides of the gallery, the leader at the center with a pitchpipe in hand. Brownson also published ...

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Kornel Michałowski

(d Lemberg [now L′viv], June 1831). Polish bookseller, music publisher, lithographer and printer. In 1822 in Warsaw he founded a bookshop which until 1825 dealt mainly in music. He was in contact with many booksellers in Poland and abroad, and imported much music from other countries, including Schott’s edition of Beethoven’s collected works. One of Brzezina’s regular customers was the young Chopin. From about 1823 Brzezina published 309 lithographed musical works, including Śpiewy historyczne (‘Historical songs’) to words by J.U. Niemcewicz, Chopin’s Rondo op.1 (1825) and Rondo à la Mazur op.5 (1828), works by J. Damse, J. Stefani, K. Kurpiński (keyboard method, 1829), as well as Auber, Boieldieu, Rossini, Weber and others. In 1832 Gustaw Sennewald, Brzezina’s partner from 1828, purchased the firm, which then traded under his name until 1905. Brzezina also published his own trade and publishing catalogues, of which four survive (...

Article

H.C. Colles

revised by Malcolm Turner

(Carter)

(b London, March 25, 1871; d London, Oct 3, 1947). English writer on music, music editor, teacher, organist and composer. He studied at the Royal College of Music under Parratt, C.H. Lloyd and Parry (1888–92). He held posts as organist of Worcester College, Oxford (1891–4), Wells Cathedral (1896–9) and Bristol Cathedral (1899–1901), and was then appointed director of music at Harrow School, a post that he held until 1927. In 1910 he succeeded Prout as professor of music at Trinity College, Dublin, occupying the chair until 1920. In 1925 he was appointed King Edward Professor of Music in the University of London and had meanwhile begun to teach at the RCM. When he left Harrow he became music adviser to the London County Council (1927–36). In August 1937, on his retirement from the London professorship, he received a knighthood....

Article

(fl 1528–55). Music printer. He joined the chapel of Renée of France, Duchess of Ferrara, as a clerk between 1525 and 1528, and probably travelled with her household from Paris to Ferrara in September 1528. A Ferrarese document of 1549 describes him as a priest of the diocese of Clermont and almoner to Renée, and he also served there as clerk of the chapel and surgeon to Renée until 1555 or later. Together with his associates Henrico de Campis and Antonio Hucher, he was one of the first to use the single-impression method of music printing in Italy, a technique introduced to Paris early in 1528 by Attaingnant, which Buglhat may have learnt before leaving France. Campis, possibly related to the Lyonnaise music printer Jannot de Campis (fl 1504–10), is listed on the rolls of the Ferrarese court chapel as a singer from 1534 until 1549...

Article

Ruth M. Wilson

revised by Laurie J. Sampsel

(b Enfield, CT, Feb 9, 1744; d Hartford, CT, Aug 20, 1825). American singing master, composer, and tunebook compiler. He grew up in Enfield and Farmington and lived most of his life in central Connecticut. Bull married five times and had several children; he probably received his musical training in a singing-school. In 1766, he advertised for subscribers to a tunebook, The New Universal Psalmodist, in the New Haven Connecticut Gazette. (This book was never published.) Bull lived in New York City during the Revolutionary War years, where he taught singing schools and became parish clerk and master of the Charity School of Trinity Church from 1778 to 1782. He returned to Connecticut where he bought a house in Hartford in 1788 (now a state landmark), remaining there until his death in 1825. He ran a dry-goods store, hardware store, and evening school, and formed a private literary academy. Although he joined the Hartford Episcopal Church in ...

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(b Erie, PA, Dec 2, 1866; d Stamford, CT, Sept 12, 1949). American singer, composer, arranger, and music editor. His early music study included piano, voice, guitar, and bass viol. In January 1892 he won a scholarship at the National Conservatory of Music in New York. Among Conservatory faculty who influenced his career were Victor Herbert and Antonín Dvořák, director of the conservatory from September 1892 to April 1895. Burleigh became Dvořák’s copyist and librarian of the Conservatory orchestra, in which he played timpani and bass viol. He sang plantation songs and spirituals for Dvořák that he had learned from his grandfather, a former slave. Dvořák’s Symphony no.9 in E minor, “From the New World,” was written and premiered while Burleigh was at the Conservatory.

In New York Burleigh took his place among prominent African American singers such as soprano Sissieretta Jones (known as the Black Patti). In the years ...

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Michael L. Mark

(b Mankato, MN, April 8, 1886; d Horton, MI, Sept 8, 1970). American music administrator and editor. He was a reporter and assistant to the editor of the Michigan Evening Bulletin (1906–8) while a student at the Ferris Institute (1907–08). He was a music store owner and then a staff member at Acorn Press in Jackson, Michigan (1908–14), editor of Jacobs Orchestra Monthly (1915–18), advertising and sales representative for the Gibson Company (1918–24), and an editor and vice president for the Walter Jacobs Music Publishing Company in Boston (1924–30). He became the first full-time executive secretary (1930–55) of the Music Supervisors National Conference (later the Music Educators National Conference [MENC]). He edited MENC yearbooks and several other publications while building MENC into a leading organization. He was a member of a joint committee during both world wars to establish a service version of the “Star Spangled Banner” and to have it sung in schools. He received a citation for his service on the subcommittee on music of the Army and Navy Committee on Welfare and Recreation during WW II. Buttelman served as editor of the ...

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[Joan, Joannes, Johannes]

(b Jegenye [now Leghea, nr Cluj-Napoca], March 8, 1629; d Szárhegy [now Lǎzarea, nr Gheorgheni], April 25, 1687). Transylvanian compiler of music anthologies, organist, organ builder, teacher and administrator. He studied music at the Jesuit school at Mănăştur, near Cluj-Napoca, which he left in 1641. In 1648 he was converted to Catholicism from the Orthodox faith into which he was born, and he entered the Franciscan school of the monastery at Csíksomlyó (now Şumuleu, near Miercurea-Ciuc), where on 17 November 1650 he was appointed organist and teacher. He continued his philosophical and theological studies at the Franciscan college at Trnava, near Bratislava, and he was ordained priest there on 5 September 1655. He then took up several appointments at Csíksomlyó. He had studied the organ from an early age, and worked as an organ builder and restorer in Transylvania and Moldavia. He was abbot of the monasteries at Mikháza (now Călugăreni) from ...

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Stefano Ajani

revised by Patrizio Barbieri

(b Orciano, Pesaro, c1632; d Rome, Oct 14, 1700). Italian music publisher. He maintained a shop in the Roman suburb of Parione ‘at the sign of the emperor and the Genoese cross’, his own trade-mark. He owned no printing press, but made use of several Roman printers during his period of activity. The first was Carlo Ricarii, who supplied for him Michelangelo Rossi's Toccate e correnti. The first, undated edition of this work does not indicate the name of the printer; this appears in the 1657 reprint, with the typographer's name engraved on the border of the title-page. Ricarii died shortly after (2 August 1660) and his widow, Benedetta Della Valle, married Caifabri on 6 February 1663. Shortly after Ricarii's death, Caifabri published compositions by Francesco Foggia, Bonifatio Gratiani and others, and several anthologies of motets and psalms drawn from composers of the Roman school (e.g. RISM ...

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Harry Eskew

(fl Maryville, TN, 1834–7). American composer and tune book compiler. He is known to have been associated with Ananias Davisson, at least through his use of Kentucky Harmony (1816) and A Supplement to the Kentucky Harmony (1820), from both of which he borrowed extensively for his own compilation, Union Harmony: or Family Musician (Maryville, TN, 1837). Union Harmony in turn influenced later Tennessee tune books, such as John B. Jackson’s Knoxville Harmony (1838), Andrew W. Johnson’s American Harmony (1839), and W.H. and M.L. Swan’s Harp of Columbia (1848). Caldwell claimed 42 tunes in Union Harmony, which he indicated were ‘not entirely original’ but carried his harmonizations. These tunes are predominantly in the American folk-hymn idiom.

See also Shape-note hymnody §2.

G.P. Jackson: White Spirituals in the Southern Uplands (Chapel Hill, NC, 1933/R) G.E. Webb, jr: ...

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Robert Strizich

revised by Richard Pinnell

(fl 1646). Italian guitarist and music editor. He edited a collection of pieces for five-course Baroque guitar entitled Intavolatura di chitarra, e chitarriglia (Bologna, 1646). The book contains brief instructions on how to read tablature and tune the instrument, followed by 65 battute (strummed) and 24 pizzicate (plucked) pieces comprising such typical mid-17th-century Italian forms as the passacaglia, ciaccona, folia, spagnoletto and Ruggiero. According to the book's title-page it includes the works of two ‘professori’. Although no composers' names are given, 25 of the battute can be identified as paraphrases of works by Francesco Corbetta. The identity of the other ‘professore’ remains a mystery, but many of the other works in the book exist in earlier versions. The extent of Calvi's contribution as composer, rather than arranger, is therefore open to question.

W. Kirkendale: L'Aria di Fiorenza, id est Il ballo del Gran Duca (Florence, 1972), 23, 25, 27, 65, 79...

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Jerome Roche

(b ?Pavia; fl 1609–29). Italian music editor and singer. Since he was known as ‘magister et reverendo’ he must have taken orders. He was a bass singer in the choir of Pavia Cathedral from 1609 to 1626. He is of greatest interest as the collector of four noteworthy anthologies of north Italian church music published in Venice (RISM 16214, 1624², 1626³ and 16295); all contain motets except the third, which consists of litanies. The volumes include eight works by Monteverdi, seven of which are found in no other printed sources, and ten unica by Alessandro Grandi (i) and four by Rovetta (his earliest published works). Other prominent north Italians represented are Stefano Bernardi, Banchieri – who dedicated his Gemelli armonici (1622) to Calvi – Ignazio Donati, Ghizzolo, Merula, Orazio Tarditi and Turini. Calvi himself contributed motets to the first two and included pieces by his ...

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Richard Griscom

(b Lorain, OH, Mar 22, 1954). American music librarian, theorist, and editor. She received her undergraduate degree in music theory from Ohio University (BM 1976). While completing studies in music theory at Northwestern University (PhD 1985), she joined the staff of the Northwestern University Music Library (1980–98). Campana was also active in the promotion of contemporary music in Chicago through performances with the ensemble Kapture (1977–86) and by editing the monthly newsletter of New Music Chicago (1982–4). Her study of library science at the University of Chicago (MA 1987) led to her appointment as music public services librarian at Northwestern (1987–98). While at Northwestern, she also held appointments as lecturer (1993–8) and assistant dean for undergraduate studies (1993–4) in the School of Music and acting head of the Music Library (1994–6). In ...

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R. Wallace

(b Kilberry, Argyll, Jan 18, 1877; d London, April 24, 1963). Scottish music editor. He was the third son of John Campbell 10th of Kilberry and was educated at Harrow and Pembroke College, Cambridge. After leaving university, he entered the Indian Civil Service. He was appointed a judge of the High Court in 1921, and in 1928 he retired to Britain and became a lecturer in Indian law at Cambridge (1929–41). Throughout his life he was interested in the music of the Highland bagpipe; he studied with some of the leading pipers of his day and became a competent amateur player and piping judge, but he came to prominence in the piping world principally as an authority on and editor of pìobaireachd (Gaelic: ‘piping’) music. He was a stalwart of the Pìobaireachd Society, which was established in 1903 for the purpose of improving public knowledge of ...