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Patricia Brown

(b Liverpool, Feb 17, 1950). Australian performer and composer, of English birth. After studying English at the University of New South Wales (1969–77) he worked as a solo and ensemble player on a wide range of medieval, Renaissance and Baroque string, wind and percussion instruments; he also specialized in folk instruments from a variety of countries. This instrumental ability led him to work with cross-cultural groups such as Sirocco, Southern Crossings (a world music quartet founded by Atherton in ...

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Atys  

Roger J.V. Cotte

(b St Domingue [now Haiti], April 18, 1715; d Paris, Aug 8, 1784). French creole flautist, composer and teacher. His skill as a flute virtuoso and teacher made him renowned in Paris and Vienna, but his concert career was cut short by a chin wound received in a pistol duel. He was among the first flautists to use crescendo and diminuendo instead of simple echo contrasts. His compositions, all published in Paris, are primarily intended for amateur flautists: they include duos ‘en forme de conversation’ op.1 (...

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(b Verneuil, Dec 9, 1796; d Verneuil, Jan 28, 1870). French composer and teacher. His later achievements in the encouragement of amateur music-making in the provinces were foreshadowed in his youth when, at the age of 11, he wrote some marches for the local wind band at Verneuil. He played the flute and the horn, and in ...

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Boris Schwarz

(b Veszprém, June 7, 1845; d Loschwitz, nr Dresden, July 15, 1930). Hungarian violinist and teacher. He began his studies at the age of eight at the Budapest Conservatory with Ridley Kohne, continued them at the Vienna Conservatory with Jakob Dont (1857–8...

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(b Veszprém, Hungary, June 7, 1845; d Loschwitz, nr Dresden, Germany, July 15, 1930). Hungarian violinist and teacher. From 1868–1917, he taught violin at the St. Petersburg Conservatory, where his pupils included Jascha Heifetz, nathan Milstein , Mischa Elman and Efrem Zimbalist. He helped to establish the Russian school of violin playing that included use of the “Russian bow hold” in which the middle of the index finger presses into the stick resulting in a noticeably high wrist posture. He famously rejected the original dedication of Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto and only played the work after his own revisions to the solo part in ...

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Jeremy Siepmann

(b Kongsberg, Oct 22, 1948). Norwegian pianist. He gave his first recital in Oslo at the age of 15 and later studied in Paris, New York, Munich and London. In 1970 he became the first non-French pianist to win the Concours National de la Guilde Française des Artistes Solistes in Paris, and he gained international attention in ...

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Thomas Clark

(b Duncan, OK, Sept 12, 1930). American composer. A talented trumpet player from Vernon, Texas, Austin played jazz in the first One O’clock Lab Band at North Texas State University, and later served in the Fourth US Army Band based in San Antonio. He studied with Violet Archer (North Texas State University), ...

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(b Tonnedorf, nr Erfurt; d Eisenberg, nr Gera, Jan 22, 1617). German writer on music, composer and schoolmaster. In 1579 he was teaching at the Lateinschule at Ronneburg, near Gera, and in 1591 he was Rektor of the Lateinschule at Gera. Later he was a preacher at Bernsdorf, near Torgau, at Munich and at Krossen, near Gera, and from ...

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(b Mariupol, Ukraine, near the north coast of the Sea of Azov, Sept 27, 1875; d Athens, May 16, 1924). Greek composer, critic, and music educator. After the return of his family to Athens in 1887 he studied music privately with Loudovikos Spinellis, and later, in ...

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William Waterhouse

(b Bolzano, Jan 15, 1967). Italian bassoonist and teacher. After studying with Romano Santi in Bolzano from 1978 to 1985, he spent four years in Hanover with Klaus Thunemann. Following success in various international competitions and a brief spell as an orchestral player, he embarked on what has been a spectacular career as soloist, teacher and chamber artist. At the age of 22 he was appointed professor at the Stuttgart Musikhochschule, exchanging this for a similar appointment in Basle in ...

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See Liszt, Franz

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Laurie J. Sampsel

(b Milton, MA, Feb 18, 1760; d French Mills, NY, Nov 23, 1813). American composer, singing master, singer, and tunebook compiler. Babcock lived most of his life in Watertown, MA, where he worked as a hatter. As a teenager he fought in the Revolutionary War, and he died while enlisted in the Army during the War of ...

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Tatjana Marković

(b Belgrade, Feb 10, 1927; d Belgrade, Oct 13, 2009). Serbian composer and music critic. He studied composition with Milenko Živković at the Academy of Music in Belgrade, graduating in 1955, and at the Accademia Nazionale di S. Cecilia in Rome (1967–8...

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Douglass Seaton

(b Berlin, 4/Oct 5, 1796; d Berlin, April 15, 1869). German organist, teacher and composer. He was not a descendant of J.S. Bach. He received his earliest musical training from his father Gottfried Bach, organist at the Dreifaltigkeitskirche in Berlin, and accompanied services there while still a boy. After completing his secondary education he took a teaching position in a noble household outside Berlin. On his father’s death in ...

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Peter Ross

(b Zürich, Dec 26, 1695; d Zürich, June 23, 1755). Swiss composer and music pedagogue. The year of his birth has been given incorrectly in some sources as 1697. His father Joseph, originally a tailor and from 1692 a schoolteacher, planned a theological training for Johann Caspar, who was his second son. After study at the cathedral school, the Collegium Humanitatis, and (from ...

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(b ?Normandy, ?1625; d Paris, Sept 27, 1690). French singing teacher and composer. He may have been a priest. He lived for most of his life in Paris but he was also in the service of Charles of Lorraine, Duke of Elbeuf. Although he was important as a composer and teacher, Bacilly’s most valuable legacy is the vocal treatise ...

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Truus de Leur

(b Vienna, June 9, 1879; d Brussels, Jan 3, 1963). Dutch violinist and teacher of Hungarian origin. He studied at the conservatories in Vienna and Brussels (with Ysaÿe and César Thomson), and taught at the Brussels Conservatory, 1910–18. In 1919 he settled in Holland and was one of the distinguished violinists who supplemented the Amsterdam Concertgebouw Orchestra under Mengelberg for the historic Mahler Festival of ...

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Mary Berry

(b nr Ilchester, c1214; d Oxford, c1292). English theologian and philosopher. He studied first under Grosseteste in Oxford, then in Paris. In 1247 he gave up his official teaching in Paris, returning some three years later to Oxford. In about 1255...

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Jui-Ching Wang

(b Newton, MA, March 20, 1920). American music educator. A leader in the American Kodály movement, she attended the Dana Hall School in Wellesley, Massachusetts, and the New England Conservatory (BM 1952, MM 1954). She taught in the former school before becoming founding director of its music unit, the Dana School of Music (...

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Paul C. Echols

(b Detroit, MI, Feb 19, 1803; d New Haven, CT, Dec 23, 1881). American author of hymn texts and hymnbook compiler. The son of a missionary to the Native Americans, he was educated at Yale University and Andover Theological Seminary. While at Andover he compiled a small pamphlet containing 101 missionary hymns, three of them his own: entitled ...