141-160 of 194 results  for:

Clear all

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama and Barry Kernfeld

(b Hiroshima, Japan, Feb 21, 1945). Japanese alto saxophonist and leader. He played clarinet in a high school brass band and alto saxophone in a college band. After moving to Tokyo (1969) he performed and recorded in Japan and Europe as a member of Yosuke Yamashita’s trio (1972–9). With his own group he toured Germany and France and appeared at the Newport Jazz Festival in New York (1979). From 1980 he led a trio, though he also organized various orchestras. In 1986 he recorded in a duo with Peter Kowald and in a wild improvised dialogue with Peter Brötzmann as a guest soloist with the group Last Exit (Brötzmann, Sonny Sharrock, Bill Laswell, and Ronald Shannon Jackson). Later he participated in projects with Laswell, Jackson, the Senegalese percussionist Ayib Dieng, the Gambian kora (plucked harp-lute) player Foday Musa Suso, and other musicians from different traditions. Sakata’s performances display considerable virtuosity and an engaging sense of humor....

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

(b Hakodate, Japan, March 14, 1952). Japanese guitarist. Having taught himself guitar he performed in Sapporo with Sadao Watanabe, who encouraged him to embark on a professional career in Tokyo; however, within a year he had returned to Hakodate. In 1977 he moved to Chicago, and two years later he performed at the first Chicago Jazz Festival. Later he recorded in duos with Harvie Swartz (1989) and Ron Carter (1991) and in a trio with Swartz and Victor Lewis (1989) and toured Japan leading a quintet that consisted of Randy Brecker, Don Friedman, Swartz, and Jimmy Cobb (1991).

G. Lees and J. Reeves: Jazz Lives: 100 Portraits in Jazz...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Oct 6, 1941). Japanese pianist, composer, arranger, and leader. He studied violin and piano from the age of five, and while still in high school was a member of George Kawaguchi’s group Big Four (known during his membership as Big Four Plus One). After graduating from Keio University in Tokyo he studied at the Berklee School of Music (1966–8). He then returned to Tokyo, formed a trio, and recorded his first album, Palladium (1969), which was critically acclaimed. Also in Tokyo he recorded with Charles Mingus and Helen Merrill (1971), and in Germany he recorded as a leader (1971) and with Attila Zoller (1971), Karl Berger (1971), and Albert Mangelsdorff (1973). Sato’s best-known compositions include Samardhi, Fairy Rings, Fall Out (1972), Yamataifu (1972, played by Toshiyuki Miyama’s New Herd), ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Feb 10, 1930; d August 28, 2006). Japanese guitarist and leader. He took up guitar at the age of 12, spent much time listening to jazz on the radio, and then began playing at military bases, where, in 1957, he took lessons from a former member of Chico Hamilton’s band. A pioneer of modern jazz guitar in Japan, he formed the group Double Beats in 1954 and from 1966 led a quintet; Shotaro Moriyasu, Norio Maeda, Akitoshi Igarashi, and Motohiko Hino were among his sidemen at various times. His recordings as a leader include the albums Shungo Sawada vs Sadanori Nakamure (1975, Tei. GM5003) and Shungo (1983, Denon YX7342). Sawada performed in Japan with Benny Goodman, Stan Getz, Helen Merrill, Oscar Peterson’s trio, Dizzy Gillespie, Thad Jones, and Sonny Stitt, among others, and from 1981 he was a member of Maeda’s Wind Breakers. He established a recording company and label, Elec (...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Amagasaki, Japan, Nov 26, 1953). Japanese pianist. He learned piano from the age of six. Inspired to play jazz at the age of 13 when he watched the film The Glenn Miller Story, he formed an amateur jazz band in high school, studied composition at Kunitachi College of Music in Tokyo, and embarked on a professional career in ...

Article

Frank Büchmann-Møller

(b Bangkok, Feb 6, 1926; d Copenhagen Jan 2, 1981). Danish drummer. His father owned rubber plantations in Siam and Malaysia, and he spent his early childhood in both countries. He moved to Denmark in 1934 and played professionally with the Harlem Kiddies from 1947 to 1953. After performing in Sweden with Arne Domnérus (1953–5) he returned to Denmark to work as a freelance, and played regularly with Stan Getz during the saxophonist’s stay in Scandinavia (1958–61). He then served as the house drummer at the Montmartre, Copenhagen (1962–3), and as a member of the Radiojazzgruppen (i) (1961–5) and the Radioens Big Band (1964–9). Thereafter he was inactive on account of ill-health. Schiöpffe was regarded as one of the best European drummers of his era – he was chosen to be a member of the European All Stars during the International Jazz Festival in Berlin in ...

Article

Tony Gould

[Robert Alexander ]

(b ’Akko, Palestine [now in Israel], Aug 24, 1943). Australian pianist. As a small child he lived in England, where he first studied piano. His family moved to Melbourne, Australia, in 1950 and during the 1960s he gained experience with various ensembles there. He performed and recorded with Ted Vining (from 1969), Alan Lee (1972–3), and Brian Brown (from 1974), and accompanied such visiting Americans as Dizzy Gillespie, David Baker, Phil Woods, Jimmy Witherspoon, Milt Jackson, and Lee Konitz; he toured Scandinavia with Brown in 1978. In 1984 he formed the group Blues on the Boil, which was influenced by the blues styles of Chicago and the Mississippi Delta; he also played with Onaje, a group led by Allan Browne. He is a member of the faculty of the Victorian College of the Arts in Melbourne, where he teaches in the improvisation department....

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Dec 23, 1954). Japanese percussionist. He grew up in a family of traditional Japanese musicians and learned taiko (traditional Japanese drums) from the age of three; he made his début in kabuki when he was ten and started on drums and percussion when he was 13. Having majored in traditional Japanese percussion, he graduated from the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music, though he had already begun to work professionally in other genres at the age of 19. In 1978 he joined a popular jazz-fusion group, The Square. Later he accompanied the popular singer and songwriter Akiko Yano and worked with Akira Sakata, the traditional percussion group Kodo (1981), and the Asian Fantasy Orchestra (1992). Senba recorded with Material, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Ronald Shannon Jackson, and Kazumi Watanabe’s Mobo Band, and from 1982 he led various groups of his own. While maintaining a busy studio career he has been active in traditional Japanese music, jazz, and pop. In ...

Article

Shakti  

Barry Kernfeld

Fusion group. It was formed in the USA in 1973 as a trio by John McLaughlin, the South Indian violinist Lakshminarayana Shankar (brother of L. Subramaniam), and the North Indian tablā player Zakir Hussain; to suit the character of the other instruments, McLaughlin played a specially designed acoustic guitar based on the Indian ṇā. After giving concerts before small audiences on the East Coast the group recorded Shakti (1975, Col. PC34162), in which the original members were joined by the percussionists Vikku (T. H.) Vinayakaram (whose main instrument was the gha ṭam, a clay pot drum) and R. Raghavan (m ṛda ṅgam, a wooden, double-headed barrel drum). As a quartet (without Raghavan) Shakti recorded A Handful of Beauty (1976, Col. PC34372), then in 1977 it toured Europe and made another recording before disbanding later in the year. The name Shakti, meaning “together,” refers to the union of jazz guitar improvisation with North and South Indian rhythms. The group favored fast tempos in complex meters, but its use of repetitive patterns and simple harmonies suggested links with jazz-rock. In the late 1990s Shakti re-formed to record, with the ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Nov 3, 1939). Japanese pianist and leader. He began piano lessons at the age of seven and later studied composition at Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music. In 1963 he joined George Kawaguchi’s Big Four. Later he played in Shungo Sawada’s quintet and with the tenor saxophonist Takatoshi Oya, then in 1976 he formed his own trio and big band. From 1978 Shibuya was active as an accompanist to and arranger for singers, among them the jazzy pop singer Maki Asakawa.

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, Sept 23, 1964). Japanese pianist and leader. He took piano lessons from the age of three, and later, while studying composition in Tokyo at the Kunitachi College of Music (from 1982), he played jazz piano professionally. In 1989 he toured Japan as a member of Lionel Hampton’s orchestra and Vincent Herring’s quartet, and in 1990 he was a member, with Masahiko Osaka, of Roy Hargrove’s quartet. This led to the formation the following year of the acclaimed quintet Jazz Networks (with the addition of Antonio Hart); from 1992 Shiina served as a leader of the group. He led his own trio from 1994, which consisted of Osaka and Reginald Veal for his first album as a leader and an ensuing tour of Japan. His next two recordings (1995, 1996) were with Veal and Herlin Riley as sidemen (Nicholas Payton was guest soloist on the latter), and the following album (...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Kobe, Japan, Feb 27, 1928). Japanese drummer. He attended Kansei Gakuin University in Osaka until shortly after World War II. Having learned to play drums at American military bases in 1945 he began working professionally as a drummer and moved to Tokyo in 1946. There he played with the Red Hot Boys, the Gramercy Five, and the CB Nine, one of the first bop groups in Japan, and during the early 1950s he joined Toshiko Akiyoshi’s Cozy Quartet and Shotaro Moriyasu’s group. After a period of relative inactivity in the 1960s he led trios and quartets in the 1970s and performed with trios led by the pianist Yuzuru Sera and Norio Maeda, as well as with other groups. Shimizu is highly regarded in Japan for his sensitive, energetic, and melodic style of playing.

Article

W. Anthony Sheppard

[Takeshi ]

(b Sacramento, CA, Nov 11, 1922; d San Dimas, CA, April 17, 2002). American Jazz and film music arranger, composer, and band leader. Shindo grew up in the Little Tokyo district of Los Angeles where he heard traditional Japanese music. In his teens, he became interested in jazz but planned to pursue a career in electrical engineering. As a second generation (Nisei) Japanese American, Shindo was interned at the Manzanar Relocation Center in March 1942. He pursued musical studies in the camp and completed correspondence courses in orchestration. Shindo left Manzanar in November 1944 when he enlisted as a translator in the Military Intelligence Service. Discharged from the Army in 1947, he formed his own big band in Los Angeles.

Shindo continued musical studies at multiple institutions in Los Angeles, studying composition at the University of Southern California with miklós Rózsa and eventually completing a Masters in Asian Studies in ...

Article

Sitar  

Barry Kernfeld

A large, plucked, fretted string instrument used chiefly in the classical repertory of the South Asian subcontinent. It became familiar to Western audiences in the late 1960s when it was used by several rock musicians, and was introduced to jazz soon after; Miles Davis recorded in 1969 with a group that included a sitar. In the same year Collin Walcott played sitar on the title track of Tony Scott’s album Homage to Lord Krishna (Verve 68788), and he later came to be regarded as the most important sitarist in jazz; he played the instrument regularly in the groups Oregon and Codona. A fine example of jazz sitar playing is Walcott’s solo on the track Witchi-tai-to from Oregon’s album Out of the Woods (1978, Elek. 154). John Scofield recorded on electric sitar with Herbie Hancock in 1995, but this is not a significant performance, and since Walcott’s death in 1984...

Article

Peter Darke

(b Rangoon, Burma, 1918). British clarinetist. While at college in Burma in the late 1930s he organized a cooperative group, the Jive Boys. After the Japanese invaded Burma in 1942 he was evacuated to India and played as a freelance before joining Teddy Weatherford at the Grand Hotel, Calcutta; among the recordings he made with a small group from the band is One Dozen Roses (1942, Col. FB40231). Solomon left Weatherford at the end of 1944 and formed a new Jive Boys group, which recorded extensively, then after Weatherford’s death (1945) he took some of the former’s members and augmented his own group to 14 pieces. He also wrote arrangements for this new band. He emigrated to Australia after World War II and worked initially as a musician in Sydney.

K. P. Darke: “Teddy Weatherford’s Indian Recording Sessions 1941–45,” Matrix, nos.107–8 (1975), 3 P. Darke...

Article

Otto Flückiger

[Max ]

(b Basel, Switzerland, March 2, 1914; d Colombo, Sri Lanka, March 12, 1980). Swiss clarinetist and saxophonist. Educated in architecture, he played harmonium, violin, and guitar before taking up clarinet and saxophone. Having first performed locally in amateur bands, he left Basel to take a professional engagement in Surabay, Java, but he returned in 1938 and the following year worked with Fred Böhler. He was drafted into the Swiss Army at the outbreak of the war and established a musical cabaret for soldiers. Following his discharge he formed a group which gradually grew into a big band (from 1944), with his wife, Molly McCormick, as its singer; from 1947 he reduced this to a smaller group which toured Switzerland, the Netherlands, and elsewhere. Later, in Berne, Strittmatter opened a music shop and manufactured amplifiers. In the late 1970s he moved to Colombo, Sri Lanka, where he performed in clubs. He specialized in playing “dirty” (i.e., with a gruff, vocalized timbre), and he may be heard to advantage on two tracks as a leader, ...

Article

(b Madras, India, July 23, 1947). Indian violinist and leader. In his youth he learned violin and performed in classical concerts. After a period reading medicine he traveled to the USA to study Western music as a graduate at the California Institute for the Arts (MFA). In 1973–4 he toured the USA and Europe with the rock guitarist George Harrison and the sitar player Ravi Shankar, performing a fusion of Indian music and rock, and in 1978 he composed for and recorded with Stu Goldberg and made a series of duo recordings with Larry Coryell and his first album as a leader. Later he recorded as a member of the group Rainbow with John Handy and the sarod player Ali Akbar Khan (the album Fantasy without Limit, 1979, Trend 524), as the leader of a quartet consisting of Coryell, George Duke, and Tom Scott (c1982), and as a leader with Stephane Grappelli (the album ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

[Colgen ]

(b Tokyo, May 26, 1940; d Tokyo, May 21, 2001). Japanese pianist, arranger, and leader. He took piano lessons from the age of 11, began to play jazz while attending Keio University, Tokyo, and made his début with George Kawaguchi’s Big Four. After playing with the Bluecoats, led by Shigenori Obara, and the quartet led by the drummer Akira Ishikawa he joined Terumasa Hino’s quintet in 1968, following the departure of Masabumi Kikuchi; thereafter he contributed greatly to the group’s success. From 1979 to 1986 he led a quintet, The Players, though he also led a trio and was active as a studio musician. Suzuki taught piano and arranging in Tokyo at Ann School of Music.

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama and Barry Kernfeld

[Hisao; Oma]

(b Tokyo, Jan 2, 1946). Japanese double bass player and leader. He first played double bass at American military bases. Later he recorded with the pianist Shotaro Mariyasu (1954), played with Hidehiko Matsumoto (1961–4) and Sadao Watanabe (1964–5), and led a bop group in Tokyo (1965–9); he also recorded with Hampton Hawes (1968). In New York he worked with Art Blakey (1969–70) and performed with Thelonious Monk, Ella Fitzgerald, Wynton Kelly, Ron Carter, Charles Mingus, Paul Desmond, Bobby Timmons, and Jim Hall, usually in duos. In 1971 he returned to Japan, where he appeared as a sideman with Kenny Burrell’s quartet and Mal Waldron’s trio, among others, and worked again as the leader of various groups, including Soul Family, which in 1975 included Kazumasa Akiyama. He doubled on cello on a number of his albums recorded between ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama and Barry Kernfeld

(b Yokohama, Japan, Aug 16, 1932; d Tokyo, Sept 10, 1995). Japanese clarinetist and leader. His father played violin in orchestras accompanying silent films, and all three of his brothers became professional musicians. He grew up in Zushi from 1945 (after Yokohama was bombed) and began practicing on his elder brother’s clarinet; he turned professional at the age of 16. After playing successively with four bands, including Fumio Nanri’s Hot Peppers, in 1952 he formed a quintet, the Rhythm Aces, modeled after Benny Goodman’s classic small groups; in tribute to Goodman’s forthcoming appearance in Japan in January 1957 he made several recordings in this style. Later in 1957 he had considerable success with a Hawaiian-style pop recording, Suzukake no michi (Sycamore road), on which Peanuts Hucko played. His swing quintet recorded in New York with Hucko as guest soloist in 1962, and in spring 1966 Suzuki spent a month deputizing for Hucko at Eddie Condon’s club. He continued to lead the Rhythm Aces in Japan into the mid-1990s, making further recordings with this group, and also performed with Hucko, Helen Merrill, and others in a concert tour of Japan in ...