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Article

Dyegele  

Konin Aka

Term for a xylophone or ensemble of xylophones and kettledrums of the Senufo people in the Korhogo region of the Ivory Coast. The ensemble normally comprises three or four frame xylophones, each with 12 bars slung on cords attached to the frame at each end. Under each bar is a gourd resonator with spider’s web mirliton. All the xylophones have the same pentatonic tuning; they are accompanied by three wooden kettledrums. The players wear iron jingles on their wrists. The ...

Article

Ebim  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Lamellaphone of the Mbun people in the Kwango region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has usually about 10 to 12 metal tongues and a box resonator, with a soundtable that projects beyond the box. Under a variety of names, and with a variable number of tongues, it is the most common type of lamellaphone throughout the Democratic Republic of the Congo and was called the ‘river type’ (...

Article

Ebumba  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Lamellaphone of the Ngombe people of the north-western Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Bangala call it ekumbe. It has metal tongues and an elliptical soundtable sewn onto a tortoise carapace or hollowed piece of wood serving as a resonator. In the past, sometimes a human or monkey skull was used as a resonator, especially among the Lokele....

Article

Edjwa  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Single-headed tronco-conical drum of the Sengele people of the Lake Mai Ntombe region, Democratic Republic of the Congo. The body is about 50 cm tall and has a handle on the side. The head is laced to a tension band which is nailed around the body.

O. Boone: Les tambours du Congo belge et du Ruanda-Urundi...

Article

Ega  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Ehonga  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Ekembi  

J. Gansemans, K.A. Gourlay and Ferdinand J. de Hen

[ekembe, ekeme]

Lamellaphone of the Loi people of the north-western Democratic Republic of the Congo. Eight or nine wooden or metal tongues are attached to a wooden soundtable which is affixed with rubber to the underside of a tortoise carapace serving as a resonator. Other ethnic groups in the DRC call lamellaphones like this by different names, for example the Bango ...

Article

Ekidi  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

[kpai]

Board zither of the Mamvu, Bari, and Budu peoples of the northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. It usually has five parallel strings of rattan that are plucked with a small wooden plectrum. Small board zithers like the ekidi (about 20 by 50 cm) often have a calabash resonator. Larger board zithers can have 12 to 20 strings divided in two groups....

Article

K.A. Gourlay

Mouth bow of the Konjo people of Uganda. It is made from a section of the wall of a bamboo pole 1.5 to 1.75 cm wide and a few millimetres thick. A small half-calabash, the size of an orange and large enough to cover the player’s mouth, is tied to the centre of the bow; the string is slack when not in use and for performance is passed over notches to the ends of the bow to hold it taut. When played, the half-calabash is placed over the mouth, or across a corner of the mouth and cheek, and the tip of the bow is supported firmly in the upturned left hand, the thumb and forefinger of which are free to stop the string, or occasionally to pluck it. The right hand strokes the string with a broad piece of grass not more than 5 cm long. (K.P. Wachsmann and M. Trowell: ...

Article

Ekulu  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

[ekuku]

Drum of the Tetela people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The ekuku of the Doko is a war drum that is also used in rituals after the death of an important person. The ekulu and ekuku are both played with a stick.

O. Boone: Les tambours du Congo belge et du Ruanda-Urundi...

Article

Elolom  

Article

Elondja  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

[elundja]

Clapperless iron bell of the Binja people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is about 50 to 60 cm long and usually mounted on a wooden two-pronged fork. It is hit with a wooden stick tipped with a rubber ball; the place where it is struck is generally decorated with 10 to 13 bumps hammered from the inner side. Among the Yela and Kota of the DRC, elondja denotes a clapperless bell with, instead of the fork, a simple metal hook forged in the iron. Among the Kusu elondja refers to a double clapperless bell. Formerly the elondja was owned only by a rich person or a chief, who used it to announce war or to gather people.

F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi (Tervuren, 1960), 42, 44, 45 G. Knosp: Enquête sur la vie musicale au Congo belge, vol.1 (Tervuren, 1968)...

Article

Emidiri  

Peter Cooke

[emudiri]

Drum of the Teso people of Uganda. It is called emidiri in Soroti and Serere, and emudiri in Ngora, Kumi, and Pallisa districts. It is cylindrical, open at the bottom, approximately 1 metre long and 30 cm in diameter, and is held between the knees and beaten by the flat of the hand. The drum is played for the birth of twins, usually with two smaller ...

Article

Endumba  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Article

Engwara  

Peter Cooke

Mirliton of Busoga, eastern Uganda. It is made from a section of the long neck of a gourd, with its narrow end covered by the membrane from spider’s egg capsules. With its mouth-hole cut into the side, it resembles a small, side-blown gourd trumpet, but it is sung into, not blown, by women members of the ...

Article

Peter Cooke

[obulere]

Panpipe of the Soga people of Uganda. It is a single row or raft of 8 to 13 (most commonly 10) pipes made from lengths of elephant grass. Nowadays larger instruments often contain pipes made from modern materials such as plastic tubes from bicycle pumps. The pipes are usually laced together between two flat pieces of wood using fibre or, more commonly nowadays, rubber strips from old inner tubes. The mouth-holes, at the top, are cut straight across and the lower ends are closed by a natural node or a plug. In the 1950s only one clan played these instruments, in three different-sized pairs to the accompaniment of two small drums. They now occur in small mixed ensembles that may include drums, fiddles, rattles, a flute, and sometimes a xylophone, played for dancing and general entertainment....

Article

Ennanga  

K.A. Gourlay

Bow harp of the Ganda people of Uganda. Similar bow harps are found throughout Uganda (except in the northeast and extreme southwest) under various names including the Soga kimasa, Nyoro ekidongo (ekidongo li), Acholi opuk agoya and loterokuma, and Lango and Labwor tum. The necks of the Teso adeudeu, Jopadhola entongoli, and Gwere otongoli have a shallow curve, and the neck rests loosely in the soundbox, which can be a tortoise shell. All these harps have tuning pegs; the Ganda ennanga also has movable rings of banana fibre around the neck to act as brays and add a buzz to the sound. The soundtable is of mammal skin or, with some Nyoro ekidongoli and Konjo kinanga (ekihako), lizard or snakeskin. The strings pass through individual holes in the skin and are knotted through a flat wooden strip that acts as tailpiece; this is pulled tight against the soundtable by the tension of the strings. One or two large soundholes in the skin also provide an opening for repair. Ganda, Soga, and Nyoro harps use the dense W-type lacing from the soundtable to a retaining strip of skin at the back of the soundbox, similar to that of the Uganda drum of those areas; the Teso ...

Article

Enseegu  

Peter Cooke

[ensegu, nseegu, nsegu]

Term for a set of flutes, or a single flute, associated with the courts of the kings of Bunyoro and Tooro in Uganda. The instruments in Bunyoro were made by joining two wooden troughs to form a slightly conical tube made airtight along its length by a covering made from the trachea of a cow or strips of lizard skin. The tube has a sharply bevelled blowing rim and usually a small hole at the the tip of the distal end. This hole can be opened to provide an extra note, though the larger flutes each sound usually only one note in an ensemble. The playing is sometimes combined with brief vocal recitations.

In neighbouring Nkore, which once also supported a royal court, the sets were known as esheegu (or nshegu) and were made from bamboo or clay in three different sizes (called, from smallest to largest, enyahuro, encwa...

Article

Epopo  

Article

Esamo  

F.J. de Hen

Kundu name for a Lamellaphone of the Kutu of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has 10 metal tongues fastened to a box resonator about 12 × 26 × 3 cm in size.

LaurentyS, 194 F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi (Tervuren, 1960), 78, 79, 92...