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Yury Gabay

(b Gyandzha [later Kirovabad], Nov 22, 1922; d Feb 2, 1984). Azerbaijani composer. The son of a famous tar player and singer, he studied at the Kirovabad Music College (tar class 1938) and then at the Baku College in the composition classes of Burshteyn and Karnitskaya. In ...

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Mary Oyer and Doreen Helen Klassen

The Protestant denominations of the Amish (249,000 in North America in 2010) and the Mennonites (1.6 million in 56 countries worldwide and 524,000 in North America in 2009) have a common source in the Anabaptist movement of 16th-century Europe. Emerging in the 1520s, the Swiss Brethren separated from the early Reformers and the Roman Catholics for reasons more radical than those of Luther or Zwingli: believers’ baptism (thus Anabaptists, or “Rebaptizers”), priesthood of all believers, separation of church and state, and commitment to discipleship of Christ to the point of rejecting participation in war. Within the next decade, Anabaptists emerged in Bohemia, southern Germany, and the Netherlands....

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William Ashbrook

Tragedia lirica in four acts by Franco Faccio to a libretto by Arrigo Boito after William Shakespeare ’s play Hamlet; Genoa, Teatro Carlo Felice, 30 May 1865 (revised, Milan, Teatro alla Scala, 9 February 1871).

The second and last of Faccio’s operas, Amleto commands attention for two reasons. First, it marks an effort of two prominent members of the Scapigliatura (a late Romantic reform movement in northern Italy in the 1860s and 70s) to renew the tradition of Italian opera. Second as the first of Boito’s librettos derived from Shakespeare, it reveals the future poet of ...

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Marita P. McClymonds

Opera seria in two acts by Gaetano Andreozzi to a libretto by Giuseppe Maria Foppa after a tragedy by Jean-François Ducis; Padua, Teatro Nuovo, 12 June 1792.

Amleto (soprano castrato) is tormented by his father’s ghost demanding revenge for his murd’er. In an attempt to learn who committed the deed, all gather at his funeral urn. As Amleto’s mother Geltrude (soprano) and her lover Claudio (tenor) approach, the urn bursts into flames. Amleto holds Claudio responsible. Amelia (mezzo-soprano), Claudio’s daughter and Amleto’s betrothed, reports to Geltrude and Noresto (mezzo-soprano castrato) that conspirators are seeking Amleto’s death. In the final scene Claudio fatally wounds Geltrude. Amleto captures him and bids a heartbroken farewell to his dying mother....

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AMM  

Simon Adams

British free improvising ensemble, formed in 1965 by the percussionist Eddie Prévost, the tenor saxophonist Lou Gare, and the guitarist Keith Rowe. Initially including the pianist and composer Cornelius Cardew (1966–73), it made its first recording in 1966, toured Europe in the late 1960s, visited the USA in ...

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Laurence Libin

German manufacturer of harpsichords. The firm was founded in 1927 in Eisenberg (Thuringia) by the brothers Michael and Alois Ammer (both d 1947), who had previously worked in Eisenberg for their uncle, the piano maker Josef Ammer (b Munich, 1887). Gebr. Ammer, like its competitors Neupert, Sperrhake, and Wittmayer, produced ...

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Clyde William Young

(b Naumburg, c1530; d Leipzig, bur. 29 Jan 1597). German organist and keyboard music arranger. In the foreword of his 1571 tablature Ammerbach stated that he had ‘from childhood on, even from birth, a singular desire and love, charm and inclination’ towards music so that he ‘proceeded to eminent masters in foreign lands, to probe, bear, and endure much for it’. He enrolled for half a year at the University of Leipzig in ...

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Anthony F. Carver

(b Imst, Tyrol, c1560; d Vienna, between 1 and June 21, 1590). Austrian composer. He may have belonged to a Franconian family who moved to Imst from Bamberg in the mid-16th century. He was a choirboy in the Hofkapelle of Archduke Ferdinand I at Innsbruck and probably attended the choir school there (it was founded in about ...

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August Scharnagl and Clytus Gottwald

(b Elsa, nr Coburg, Jan 26, 1540; d Marktbreit, Bavaria, Jan 26, 1589). German clergyman and hymn writer. He matriculated at the University of Wittenberg on 13 October 1561, at the University of Jena in September 1562 and at Wittenberg again in October 1564...

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Peter C. Muir

(b Chicago, IL, Sept 23, 1907; d Chicago, Dec 2, 1949). American jazz pianist. He was one of the most important figures in the popularization of boogie-woogie. Ammons began playing professionally as a teenager and performed in jazz bands and on the rent party circuit in Chicago. By the late 1920s he was working regularly as the pianist in several small bands, including those of Francis Moseley, William Barbee, and Louis D. Banks. It was with the last of these that he first recorded, in ...

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Kenny Mathieson

(b Chicago, IL, April 14, 1925; d Chicago, Aug 6, 1974). American jazz tenor saxophonist and bandleader, son of Albert (C.) Ammons. He studied music under Captain Walter Dyett at Du Sable High School and was influenced by Lester Young and Coleman Hawkins. After touring with the trumpeter King Kolax in ...

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Anthony J. Greening

(b Ely, bap. Aug 24, 1579; d Ely, bur. July 28, 1641). English composer and organist. He was born into a family which had close connections with the music of Ely Cathedral; a Michael Amner, who was a lay clerk there from 1576 to 1588...

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Renato Bossa

(b Sciacca, nr Agrigento, c1650; d Naples, c1695). Italian composer. He went from his native Sicily to Naples to complete his musical education and remained there until his death. He was maestro del coro of S Paolo Maggiore and later of the Conservatorio di S Onofrio (...

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Jeffry Mark and Gaynor G. Jones

(b Bamberg, 1763; d Wallerstein, nr Nördlingen, March 29, 1825). German conductor and composer. He studied singing with Fracasini and the violin with Bäuerle at Bamberg. After his voice broke, he studied the horn with Punto, who took him on concert tours in Germany, France and Austria. From ...

Article

Amor  

F.J. de Hen

Drum of the Alur of eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, reserved for the use of the king. The two cowhide heads are laced together with leather thongs on the wooden shell. It is beaten with two sticks, or by two men each beating one head with two sticks. (...

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Scott L. Balthazar

Farsa sentimentale in one act by Simon Mayr to a libretto by Gaetano Rossi after Jean-Nicolas Bouilly ’s libretto Léonore, ou L’amour conjugal; Padua, Teatro Nuovo, 26July 1805.

Mayr’s opera is the third of four works based on Bouilly’s story; the others are by Gaveaux (...

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Opera by Giovanni Paisiello; see Molinara, La .

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Opera by Domenico Scarlatti; see Narciso.

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Opera by Alessandro Scarlatti; see Equivoci nel sembiante, Gli.

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Graham Hardie

Commedia per musica in three acts by Leonardo Leo to a libretto by Gennaro Antonio Federico; Naples, Teatro Nuovo, autumn 1739.

Amor vuol sofferenza is one of the finest surviving examples of the Neapolitan dialect comedy tradition, with the librettist at pains to ensure cohesion between the ...