1,661-1,680 of 57,944 results

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See Gluck, Christoph Willibald, Ritter von

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Anche  

Philip Bate

The French term for the prepared reed of a wind instrument, as distinct from roseau meaning ‘reed’ in a general or botanical sense. (The latter word is used by the reed growers and is extended by French suppliers to cover cut and split sections of the plant stem up to the actual stage of shaping.) The plural, ...

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Robert Stevenson

(b ?Urrestilla, nr Azpeitia, 1462; d Azpeitia, July 30, 1523). Spanish composer. He was the second son of Martín García de Anchieta and Urtayzaga de Loyola (an aunt of Ignatius Loyola) and may have studied at Salamanca University, where the music professor from ...

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Susan Wingrove

City in Alaska, USA. Anchorage Opera, a nationally recognized regional non-profit-making company founded by Elvera Voth, its artistic director, presented Pagliacci as its first production in 1975, followed by The Ballad of Baby Doe to celebrate America’s 1976 bicentenary, then La bohème in 1977. In ...

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Concert series given in London from 1776 to 1848 by the Concert of Ancient (Antient) Music. See London, §V, 2 .

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James W. McKinnon and Robert Anderson

In 

See Lute

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Klaus Fischer

(b Fossano, region of Cuneo, Oct 19, 1545; d Saluzzo, Cuneo, Aug 31, 1604). Italian music editor, composer and possibly writer on music. He was born into a leading aristocratic family of Melle, about 30 km from Fossano. He was educated at home and, from ...

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Renato Meucci

( fl Milan, 1709–41). Italian woodwind instrument maker . His full name is known to us only from the mark on a double bassoon. His other surviving instruments, which are often made of ivory, include recorders and double recorders, oboes, a bass flute and, possibly, a flute. A search of the Milan archives has failed to reveal anyone by the name of Anciuti living in the city during the 18th century. However, it is possible that this maker was using a pseudonym: an appropriate one for a maker of reed (It.: ...

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Geoffrey Self

(b Kildare, 1880; d Richmond, Surrey, Dec 20, 1952). British composer and bandmaster. A bandmaster's son, he trained at the Royal Military School of Music (Kneller Hall), graduating at the age of 20 with the award of the gold baton for composition. For 18 years he was bandmaster of the 1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers, retiring in ...

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Ancona  

Elvidio Surian and Marco Salvarani

City in Italy. It is the capital of the Marches region. Documents of the mid-16th century attest to the activities of a group of players of wind instruments and singers employed by Municipal Authorities, to be used in civil and convivial occasions. Among the earliest musicians recorded as active in the cathedral of S Ciriaco are Nicolò Branchino or Bianchini (...

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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Livorno, Feb 28, 1860; d Florence, Feb 23, 1931). Italian baritone. Having made his début in 1889 at Trieste as Scindia in Le roi de Lahore, in 1890 he sang the King (Le Cid) at La Scala, his only appearance there. He created Silvio in ...

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Jean-Noël von der Weid

(b Paris, Aug 14, 1943). French composer. She had piano lessons when very young, then entered the Paris Conservatoire. In Olivier Messiaen’s class, she was awarded first prize for analysis (1964) and composition (1970), and in Georges Hugon’s class, first prize for harmony. She participated in courses given by Pierre Boulez, Bruno Maderna, Karlheinz Stockhausen and Henri Pousseur in Basle, Darmstadt and Cologne (...

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John Lade

Flemish family of musicians.

(b Bruges, Oct 22, 1779; d Bruges, July 12, 1848). Composer and teacher. He was a choirboy at St Donatian and then went to Paris, where he studied the violin with Kreutzer and Baillot and harmony with Catel. He returned to Bruges in ...

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Ancus  

David Hiley

In Western chant notations, a neume signifying three notes in descending order, the last of which is semi-vocalized. The ancus is the Liquescent form of the Climacus . Liquescence arises on certain diphthongs and consonants to provide for a semi-vocalized passing note to the next pitch....

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Bryce Morrison

(b Budapest, Nov 19, 1921; d Zürich, June 14, 1976). Swiss pianist of Hungarian birth. He studied at the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest, where his teachers included Dohnányi, Weiner and Kodály. He won the Franz Liszt Prize in 1940 and in 1942...

Article

Paul M. Walker

A fugue subject of extended length. The word was apparently first so defined by G.B. Martini in volume ii of Esemplare, ossia Saggio fondamentale pratico di contrappunto (1775), where it is contrasted with Attacco , an extremely brief fugue subject, and Soggetto , a fugue subject of medium or average length. Martini offered as an example of ...

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Andante  

David Fallows

A tempo (and mood) designation, often abbreviated to and.e and sometimes even ad.e , particularly in the 18th century. Though one of the most common tempo designations in the 19th century, its entry into musical scores was relatively late, and its use in the 17th and 18th centuries was often as an indication of performance manner rather than of tempo. For Brossard (...

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David Fallows

A tempo and mood designation nowadays considered a little faster than andante; but Rousseau (1768), for instance, described it as an andante with ‘a little less gaiety in the beat’. This ambiguity, which stems from whether andante is perceived as a fast or a slow tempo, troubled Beethoven, who wrote to George Thomson, his Edinburgh publisher, on ...

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David Cummings

(b Budapest, Dec 22, 1903; d Vienna, Sept 28, 1977). Hungarian mezzo-soprano . She studied with Mme Charles Cahier and Georges Anthes. After her début at the National Theatre, Budapest, she sang at the Vienna Staatsoper from 1921 (début as Carmen), appearing there regularly until ...

Article

Andelu  

Jeremy Montagu

Rattle used by ballad singers of Andhra Pradesh, India. It is a pair of hollow metal rings about 4 to 5 cm in diameter, open all around the outer circumference and containing metal pellets. The rings are worn on the thumbs or fingers. It is similar to the ...