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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Amberg, Bavaria, March 31, 1828; d Weimar, Oct 16, 1899). German bass-baritone . He made his début in 1855 at Nuremberg and was then engaged at Hamburg, Hanover and, in 1865, at the Munich Hofoper, where he remained until 1880. He sang King Mark in the first performance of ...

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Katy Romanou

(b Piraeus, 20 Nov or Dec 31, 1938; d Athens, Aug 18, 2006). Greek tuba player. Giannis Zouganelis grew up in a shack at the outskirts of Piraeus. At his father’s death from tuberculosis, his mother confined Giannis in 1948 in a borstal as a solution to her absolute poverty. Mr. Koskinas from Corfu, a music teacher in the borstal, realized Zouganelis’s talent and introduced him to some famous musicians in Athens. Zouganelis graduated from the Conservatory of Athens in ...

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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Berlin, March 29, 1800; d Berlin, July 7, 1876). German bass . He sang in the children’s chorus of the Berlin Hofoper, then in the regular chorus and in 1819 took on small parts there. After an engagement in Budapest, in 1826 he joined the Königstädtisches Theater, Berlin, making his début as Gaveston (...

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László Gombos

(b Esztergom, May 12, 1887; d Budapest, June 24, 1936). Hungarian violinist, composer and conductor. He studied the violin with Hubay and composition with Koessler at the Budapest Academy of Music (1901–6). In 1907 he qualified as a teacher, and soon after he changed his name to the more Hungarian-sounding Zsolt. As a composer, he made a highly successful début in ...

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Robert Stevenson

(b Salinas de Oro, nr Pamplona, Dec 6, 1888; d Hermosillo, Sonora, May 26, 1987). Mexican composer and pianist of Spanish birth. At the age of eight she entered the Pamplona Academia Municipal de Música, studying the piano with Joaquín Maya, and at 15 the Madrid Real Conservatorio, completing her course there in ...

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Walter Ojakäär

(b Moscow, Nov 15, 1936). Russian saxophonist and composer. Self-taught as a musician, he played clarinet in the brass band of the Moscow M. V. Lomonosov State University, where he studied physics (graduating in 1958), and tenor saxophone in the big band of the Tsentral’ny Dom Rabotnikov Iskusstva (Central house of artists; ...

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Judith Tick

(b New York, NY, Dec 25, 1885; d Miami, FL, March 8, 1981). American composer and pianist. She changed her name to Mana Zucca in her teens and became a protégée of the pianist and teacher Alexander Lambert; according to her unpublished memoirs she performed with major orchestras in New York before the age of ten (although this and other claims in her memoirs have not been verified). In ...

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Judith Tick

( b New York, Dec 25, 1885; d Miami, March 8, 1981). American composer and pianist . She changed her name to Mana Zucca in her teens and became a protégée of the pianist and teacher Alexander Lambert; according to her unpublished memoirs she performed with major orchestras in New York before the age of ten (although this and other claims in her memoirs have not been verified). In ...

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Michael Talbot

(b Casalmaggiore, nr Cremona, Nov 10, 1704; d Casalmaggiore, May 3, 1792). Italian violinist and composer. He studied the violin first in his home town, later in Parma, Guastalla and Bologna, and finally in Cremona with Gasparo Visconti. Giuseppe Gonelli taught him counterpoint. In ...

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(b London, Jan 28, 1793; d Bologna, Feb 1879). Italian bass. The son of an Italian father and an English mother, he accompanied his family to Italy in 1803 and for a time studied painting. He eventually studied singing with Crescentini in Bologna, and in ...

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Adriano Mazzoletti

(b Spilimbergo, Italy, 1911; d Asti, Italy, c1977). Italian guitarist and leader. He played guitar from the age of six. In 1934 he recorded as an unaccompanied soloist and in 1938 formed a group that later became the Quintetto Ritmico di Milano; this was modeled after the Quintette du Hot Club de France and included three guitars (of which Zuccheri played the lead), a violin (from ...

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Wolfgang Suppan

(b Vienna, July 2, 1896; d Locarno, Switzerland, April 24, 1965). Austrian musicologist and conductor, active in the USA. Possibly a member of the Schenker's circle of students in Vienna as early as 1912, Zuckerkandl studied the piano with Richard Robert and after army service during World War I, was a free-lance conductor in Vienna, ...

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Sergio Durante

( fl 1678–85). Italian soprano . She sang in Venice in 1678 in Carlo Pallavicino’s Vespasiano for the opening of the Teatro S Giovanni Grisostomo. Thereafter her name appears only in librettos of Neapolitan productions, including the first performances of Alessandro Scarlatti’s Aldimiro, o vero Favor per favore...

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James Chute and Jonas Westover

(b Cambridge, MA, Sept 25, 1944). American Flutist. She studied English at Barnard College (1962–4) before attending the Juilliard School, where she studied flute with Julius Baker (1964–6). In 1968 she married the violinist Pinchas Zukerman (they divorced in ...

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Noël Goodwin

(b Tel-Aviv, July 16, 1948). Israeli violinist of Polish descent. His father, also a violinist, encouraged a childhood instinct for music, and at eight he entered the Tel-Aviv Academy of Music, where he studied with Ilona Feher, a pupil of Hubay. In 1961...

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Michael Steinberg

(b Brooklyn, NY, 22 Oct 1943; d Hong Kong, 6 June 2017). American violinist and conductor. He started music lessons when he was three and studying the violin at the age of four. Two years later he first played in public, and at seven became a student of Galamian. He made his first orchestral appearance in 1953 with the New Haven SO, and a formal début recital at Carnegie Hall in 1956. He specialized in 20th-century music and had complete command of new and traditional virtuoso techniques. He gave the premières of concertos by Sessions (for violin, cello, and orchestra), Wuorinen (for amplified violin and orchestra), and the Scottish composer Iain Hamilton, and of works by Babbitt, Carter, Crumb, Wuorinen, and others. From 1963 to 1976 he performed frequently with the pianist Gilbert Kalish, with whom he was associated in a repertory of over 300 works. One of the original Creative Associates at the Center for Creative and Performing Arts, SUNY, Buffalo, in ...

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Jacques Aboucaya

(b Belgrade, Feb 2, 1968). Serbian pianist and composer. He discovered jazz in 1984 and quickly became one of the busiest pianists in Belgrade. After gaining a scholarship to the University of Michigan (1986) he spent time with Clare Fischer, under whose influence he renewed his approach to the piano. In the course of his service in the Serbian army (...

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Hans-Hubert Schönzeler

(b Oppach, April 9, 1850; d Munich, Sept 4, 1903). German conductor and composer. Trained at the teachers’ seminary at Bautzen (where he also received a thorough musical education), Zumpe taught in the local school at Weigsdorf in 1870–71, then went as a teacher to Leipzig, where he furthered his musical studies with Tottmann. He turned to music completely when Wagner called him to Bayreuth in ...

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(b Sachsenflur, nr Mergentheim, Jan 10, 1760; d Stuttgart, Jan 27, 1802). German composer and conductor. His father was in military service before becoming a personal servant of Duke Carl Eugen of Württemberg. After the early death of his mother, Zumsteeg received a good general education at the Carlsschule in Stuttgart, the military academy founded by the duke, where he became friendly with Schiller and the sculptor Johann Heinrich Dannecker (who made a bust of him). Zumsteeg was originally intended for a career as a sculptor, but his musical talent showed itself early. He studied the cello with the chamber virtuoso Eberhard Malterre and from ...

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Marcia J. Citron

(b Stuttgart, Dec 9, 1796; d Stuttgart, Aug 1, 1857). German composer, pianist, singer and teacher . The youngest of seven children born to the composer Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg, she studied the piano with Schlick and theory with Wilhelm Sutor. Gifted with a fine alto voice, she was soon singing and performing on the piano (e.g. at the Stuttgart Museumskonzerte). As an adult Zumsteeg mixed with leading musicians and poets. The literary ties reflected her interest in the lied, which formed the basis of her creative reputation. She also wrote several piano works, such as the early ...