17,901-17,920 of 18,024 results  for:

Clear all

Article

Jaroslav Pašmik

[Buddy ]

(b Rokycany, Czechoslovakia [now Czech Republic], Sept 16, 1964). Czech drummer. His parents were amateur musicians. From the age of 12 he played clarinet, saxophone, and drums and performed in a local brass band. He studied drums and percussion at the conservatory in Plzeň (1979–85), where he played in different rock bands and began to concentrate on jazz. In 1987 he became a member of the Czech Radio Jazz Orchestra (known from the early 1990s as Big Band Radio Prague), and he also performed with a variety of small jazz and funk groups in Prague, in the course of which he had opportunities to work as a sideman with George Mraz, Benny Golson, and Benny Bailey.

Article

Zeami  

Masakata Kanazawa

[Motokiyo, Kanze Saburō]

(b? 1363; d ?Aug 8, 1443). Japanese nō actor and writer. As a boy he was known as Fujiwaka. He was the eldest son of Kan'ami Kiyotsugu, the founder of the Kanze school of . Their performance in 1374 so impressed the shogun Ashikaga Yoshimitsu that he invited them to his court and became their lifetime patron, and eventually became the official performing art of the shogunate. Of about 50 surviving plays by Zeami, the most famous are Takasago, Izutsu and Matsukaze. He also wrote many treatises and essays, the most important of which is Fūshi Kaden (1400), better known as Kadensho (‘Book of Flowers’), a treatise on the aesthetics of . After the death of Yoshimitsu in 1428, Zeami fell foul of his successor, Ashikaga Yoshinori, and was banished to Sado Island in 1434. Whether he returned to Kyoto is not known.

See also...

Article

Karmen Salmič Kovačič

(b Ljubljana, Slovenia, Dec 22, 1912; d Ljubljana, March 13, 1970). Slovenian composer and conductor. He studied at the Ljubljana Conservatory until 1934 as a composition student of Osterc. He continued his studies at the Prague Conservatory, taking masterclasses under Suk, Hába, and Talich (1934–6). His conducting career started at the Opera and Ballet of the Slovenian National Theatre in Ljubljana after his return from Prague (1936). From 1949 to 1952 he was an artistic director of the Opera and Ballet at the Maribor National Theatre, where he founded the Maribor Philharmonic Orchestra. From 1952 until 1958 he worked as a conductor in the Zagreb National Theatre. Then he was invited back to Ljubljana as director of the Opera and Ballet at the Slovenian National Theatre for ten years (1958–68). In 1960 in Slovenia, he married the soprano Ksenija Vidali. He was one of the most highly regarded Slovenian conductors and opera directors, under whom the Slovene National Theatre achieved its strong reputation, even beyond the borders of the former Yugoslavia. He was less well-known as a composer during his lifetime, because his compositional activity was most intensive in the 1930s and 40s. After ...

Article

Roberta Costa

(b Bologna, July 23, 1904; d Bologna, Dec 20, 1995). Italian composer, conductor and musicologist. He studied the violin and, later, composition with Alfano and Nordio at the Bologna Conservatory. He then undertook much work as a conductor and organizer, founding and directing the choir Euridice, the Bologna Chamber Orchestra and, in 1950, the female G.B. Martini madrigal group. A teacher of choral music and choral conducting (1942–60), fugue and composition (1960–65) at the Bologna Conservatory, he was director from 1965 to 1974. He was secretary of the Italian Contemporary Music Society (1956–9), president of the Association of Italian Choirs and of the National Association of Music Teachers, a member of the Accademia Filarmonica di Bologna e di Roma and of the RAM, London. He also contributed to newspapers and periodicals, was editor of the journal Educazione musicale, and was responsible for the publication of several collections of popular Italian songs....

Article

Bettina Brand

revised by Roswitha Sperber

(b Grosshartmannsdorf, Saxony, June 22, 1926; d Munich, Aug 4, 2007). German composer, harpsichordist, and organist. She studied at the Leipzig Musikhochschule (1943–9), where her teachers included Johann Nepomuk David and Wilhelm Weismann (composition), Karl Straube and Günther Ramin (organ), and Anton Rohden and Rudolf Fischer (piano). From 1950 she taught at the Hanns Eisler Musikhochschule, Berlin, where she became professor for composition in 1984, the first woman in Germany to be so appointed. In 1970 she was elected to the DDR Akademie der Künste, where she gave a composition masterclass, and in 1990 she was made vice-president of the Berlin Akademie der Künste. As a performer of harpsichord and organ she specialized in early English keyboard music, the music of J.S. Bach, and contemporary music. Her many honours include the Hanns Eisler Prize (1968), the National Prize of the DDR (1975, 1982...

Article

Piero Rattalino and Noël Goodwin

(b Milan, Jan 2, 1928). Italian conductor and musicologist . He studied at the Milan Conservatory with Votto and Giulini, and he made his conducting début in 1956. He worked in the USA (1959–61) teaching and coaching the winners in American vocal competitions. He then took charge of the Italian repertory at the Deutsche Oper, Berlin (1961–3), worked with the New York City Opera in a similar capacity from 1963 and began guest conducting more widely. In 1969 he published (in Milan) a critical edition of Il barbiere di Siviglia, which was taken up by several companies and recorded under Abbado (1972); Zedda used it for his Covent Garden début in 1975, and in 1989 with the Cologne Opera in East Asia.

This publication heralded much scholarly research for the Fondazione Rossini at Pesaro, of whose complete edition of Rossini (Pesaro, 1979–) Zedda is joint general editor, with Philip Gossett. Zedda conducted numerous performances in Europe and America of familiar and less familiar Rossini works such as ...

Article

Elizabeth Forbes

(b Vienna, Feb 21, 1940). Austrian tenor . After studying in Vienna, he made his début in 1964 at Graz as Trabuco (Forza). Engaged at the Vienna Staatsoper for more than 30 years, he created Kalb in von Einem’s Kabale und Liebe (1976). He sang David, Mime and Loge at Bayreuth (1970–80) and made his Metropolitan début in 1981 as Mime and Loge. He sang at Frankfurt, Zürich and Salzburg, where he created the Producer in Berio’s Un re in ascolto (1984), repeating it at La Scala (1986). He also took part in the premières of Krenek’s Kehraus um St Stephan at the Ronacher, Vienna (1990), and Schnittke’s Gesualdo at the Vienna Staatsoper (1995). An excellent character actor with a strong voice, he had a repertory of some 140 roles, ranging from Monostatos, Pedrillo and Jaquino to Vašek, Remendado, Valzacchi, Herod and the Captain (...

Article

Tully Potter

(b Salzburg, Nov 23, 1961). Austrian violinist. His parents started teaching him the violin at five, and from 1973 he studied at the Mozarteum with his father, Helmut Zehetmair, also learning composition. Later he worked with Franz Samohyl, Max Rostal and Nathan Milstein. In 1975 he won the ‘Jugend musiziert’ competition and in 1978 the international Mozart competition. That year he made his début in Vienna, and since then he has been regarded as one of the most interesting exponents of the Austro-German violin literature. From 1981 he studied performance practice with Nikolaus Harnoncourt, for whom he acknowledges admiration. His playing of Bach, clearly influenced by the period instrument movement, strikes a good balance between the excesses of that tendency and the equally questionable practices of the old school. Sometimes, as in his 1997 recording of the Beethoven Concerto with Frans Brüggen conducting, he has played a violin set up in period fashion. Zehetmair often appears with chamber orchestras, directing the players himself in the concertos of Bach, Haydn and Mozart; and since ...

Article

(b Bielitz, July 16, 1863; d Chicago, Aug 20, 1927). American pianist of Austrian origin . She was taken to the USA in 1868 by her parents, who settled in Chicago, adopting the name of Bloomfield. She studied there under Bernhard Ziehn and Carl Wolfsohn, and in 1878 went to Vienna, where she studied with Leschetizky for five years. She returned to the USA in 1883 and at once made a name as a pianist. In 1893 and 1894 she made concert tours in Germany. In 1898 she appeared in London and at the Lower Rhine Music Festival at Cologne; she made European tours in subsequent years. She married Siegmund Zeisler, a Chicago lawyer, in 1885. She was a cousin of the pianist Moriz Rosenthal. Her style was one of individuality, fiery intensity and incisiveness. Critics noted particularly the beauty and power of her tone and the clarity and polish of her passage work. She had a special interest in promoting the works of female composers, and published a paper called ‘Women in Music’ in the Music Teachers National Association ...

Article

Robert L. Doerschuk

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[Dennis Jay ]

(b Chicago, April 10, 1938). American keyboard player. He grew up in a musical family and received extensive training in classical music, though he was always interested in improvisation. While in high school and at the University of Illinois he frequently spent time in Chicago jazz clubs, playing with such notable musicians as Joe Farrell, Wes Montgomery, Ira Sullivan, Wilbur Ware, Bob Cranshaw, and Johnny Griffin. As a medical student at Johns Hopkins University he performed frequently, concentrating on bop, and while studying at Columbia University in 1963 he took part in an audition for John Hammond, who subsequently produced four albums by Zeitlin’s trio. Later in 1963 Zeitlin moved to the San Francisco area, where he pursued two careers – one in psychiatry and one as a jazz musician. He formed a trio, which from 1964 to 1967 included Charlie Haden. In the late 1960s his experiments with prepared piano led him to use electronic keyboard instruments, but he was again concentrating on piano in the late 1980s, when his trio (consisting of the double bass player Joel DiBartolo and the drummer Peter Donald) moved into the area of lighter mood music known as new age. In the 1990s Zeitlin gave performances as an unaccompanied soloist, with his trio, and in an acclaimed duo with David Friesen; these displayed his thorough grasp of jazz theory, a sense of structure, and mastery of free improvisation. He has written some film scores (notably that for Philip Kaufman’s ...

Article

Michael Steinberg

(b Dubrovnik, Feb 21, 1922; d Rochester, NY, May 2, 2012). American violinist of Russian origin . After studying at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, his principal violin training was at the Juilliard School, New York, under Sascha Jacobson, Louis Persinger and Ivan Galamian. He made his début with the Palestine Orchestra in 1940, and first performed in New York in 1951, and in London (Wigmore Hall) in 1961. The same year he made débuts in Vienna, Milan, Stockholm and Amsterdam. As well as playing the standard repertory, he was specially involved with contemporary music and gave first performances of concertos written for him by Paul Ben-Haim (1962), Sverre Jordan (1965) and Carlos Surinach (1982) and other works by Jacob Druckman, Robert Starer, Ben-Zion Orgad, Samuel Adler and Verne Reynolds. He was one of the few violinists of his generation to have Schoenberg’s concerto in his repertory, and brilliantly mastered its musical and technical difficulties; he gave its first performances in South America (...

Article

Zofia Chechlińska

(b Grodkowice, nr Kraków, July 6, 1837; d Kraków, Jan 23, 1921). Polish composer, conductor, pianist and teacher. He studied in Kraków with Jan Germasz (piano) and Franciszek Mirecki (harmony), then (from 1859) in Prague with Alexander Dreyschock (piano) and Joseph Krejčí (composition). From 1866 to 1870 he studied composition in Paris with Henri Reber and Berthold Demcke. He had earlier studied philosophy at the University of Kraków and in 1862 received the PhD from the University of Prague. In 1871 he returned to Poland. He was appointed professor of harmony and counterpoint at the Warsaw Music Institute (1872–8) and became director of the Warsaw Music Society (1878). In 1881 he moved to Kraków, where he was initially a teacher of theory at the music school. In 1888 he helped to establish the conservatory of the music society in Kraków, and became its director. He also conducted symphony concerts and wrote articles for the Kraków journal ...

Article

Elizabeth Forbes

(b Voitswinkel, Laufen, June 7, 1856; d Weimar, Aug 9, 1934). German tenor. His voice was discovered by Richard Strauss, who arranged for him to study in Munich. He was then engaged at Weimar, making his début in 1888 as Lohengrin. At Bayreuth (1891–2) he sang Tannhäuser, Heinrich der Schreiber, Melot and an Esquire in ...

Article

(b Melbourne, Nov 15, 1874; d Melbourne, March 3, 1927). Australian violinist and conductor. He was the son of an Italian musician who had taken an opera company to Australia in the 1860s. Alberto, who was largely self-taught in music, made his first appearance as a violinist at six, and at 17 toured as a soloist in Tasmania and New Zealand; in his early years he also conducted light opera. He taught privately, at the Melbourne University Conservatorium and at the Albert Street Conservatorium. He founded several musical organizations in Melbourne, including the Melbourne String Quartet (1905) and the Melbourne SO (1906), which then consisted largely of amateurs and his own pupils. For 16 years he was conductor of the Melbourne Philharmonic Society, giving many choral works (including the Australian premières of several by Elgar) with leading soloists from Australia and abroad. He conducted one season with Melba. In ...

Article

Hans-Günter Ottenberg

(b Berlin, Dec 11, 1758; d Berlin, May 15, 1832). German composer, conductor and teacher. His father George, a mason from Saxony, settled about 1750 in Berlin, where he worked as a building contractor and married Anna Dorothea Hintze, daughter of a cloth-worker; Carl Friedrich was the second of two sons of this marriage. Zelter was first taught at home and then attended the Joachimsthaler Gymnasium. At his father’s wish, he trained as a mason, becoming in 1783 a master mason and partner in his father’s business, which he took over in 1787; he remained a member of the Berlin masons’ guild until 1815. In 1787 Zelter married Sophie Eleonora Flöricke, née Kappel, who had three children by her first marriage and bore him eight more but died in 1795. A year later he married the singer Juliane Pappritz (d 1806), who bore him two children....

Article

(von)

(b Vienna, Oct 14, 1871; d Larchmont, NY, March 15, 1942). Austrian composer and conductor. Although closely linked to the Second Viennese School (Schoenberg was his pupil), Zemlinsky was no outright revolutionary. While undisputedly a conductor of the first rank and an interpreter of integrity, he lacked ‘star quality’ and was overshadowed by more domineering personalities. His music is distinguished by an almost overpowering emotional intensity. It took several decades before it became known and began to be appreciated.

His father, born in Vienna of Slovakian Catholic descent, converted to Judaism in 1870; his mother, born in Sarajevo, was the daughter of a mixed Sephardi-Muslim marriage. At the age of four he showed aptitude at the piano, and after completing his regular schooling in 1886 he enrolled at the Vienna Conservatory, studying the piano with Door, harmony and counterpoint with Krenn and Robert Fuchs (1888–90), and composition (...

Article

Wilfried Gruhn

(b Wiesbaden, Nov 22, 1936). German composer and conductor. He studied the piano with August Leopolder and Edith Picht-Axenfeld, composition with Kurt Hessenberg and Wolfgang Fortner, and conducting with Carl Ueter at the Musikhochschule in Frankfurt and Freiburg. He began his professional career in 1959 as Kapellmeister for the Städtische Bühnen, Freiburg. From 1964 to 1968 he was the principal conductor of the Bonn opera and in 1969 accepted the post of general music director in Kiel. In 1971 he was appointed principal conductor of the Saarbrücken RSO, which became one of Europe’s leading contemporary music ensembles under his direction. He went on to co-found the Musik im 20. Jahrhundert festival with Christof Bitter, commissioning compositions from both young and well-established composers. In 1984 he moved to Hamburg, where, as the general music director of the Staatsoper, he was first to produce Nono’s opera Intolleranza. He also served as the general music director of the city. From ...

Article

Bonnie J. Blackburn

[Cavaliere Luigi del Cornetto ]

(b Ancona, 1547/8; d ?Naples, after 1602 ). Italian cornett player and writer. He was engaged as a cornett player at the court of Maximilian II in Vienna in November 1569; he left without permission in November 1573 after unsuccessfully seeking a post at the Bavarian court. After a period in Rome he returned to Vienna in 1575; by 1583 he had gained a knighthood, probably from Rudolf II. He was recruited by the court of Ferrara in 1583, where he was ‘the most highly paid single musician in the history of the Este court to that time’ (NewcombMF). During various periods of leave in Rome he sought singers for the court; in 1587 he was directing music at the Oratory of Filippo Neri. He returned to Vienna before Alfonso II d’Este’s death in 1597. His last years seem to have been spent in Naples at the court of the viceroy (Francisco Ruiz y Castro); five letters are dated from there in ...

Article

Wayne Schneider

(b New York, June 13, 1917; d Las Vegas, Jan 31, 2000). American trombonist and bandleader. He played with Les Brown (1940–42), Harry James (1943), Jimmy Dorsey (1944), and various groups in Los Angeles (1944–9); during this period he appeared in the films Seven Days Leave (1942), with Brown, and Lost in a Harem (1944), with Dorsey. He then worked as a studio musician for MGM from 1949 to 1957, when he formed his own band; in the early 1960s Zentner’s was the only newly formed jazz-oriented big band to achieve success. Up a Lazy River (1960, Lib. 55374), an arrangement by Bob Florence of the standard by Hoagy Carmichael and Sidney Arodin, was his biggest hit. The group toured the USA, accompanying such popular singers as Johnny Mathis and Nancy Wilson, and played frequently in Las Vegas. In ...

Article

David Cummings

(b Monte Carlo, 1885; d ?Monte Carlo, after 1920). Italian soprano. She sang in Venice from 1902, notably in Chopin by Giacomo Orefice and in the title role of Massenet’s Cendrillon (1905). In 1907 she appeared at the Teatro Regio, Parma, and at Covent Garden as Musetta and in Giordano’s ...