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Rosario Marciano

(b Vienna, March 10, 1899; d Berlin, Nov 26, 2001). Austrian composer and pianist. She studied at the Graz music school (1912–17) with Hugo Kroemer (piano) and Mojsisovics (composition). In 1917 she moved to Berlin and continued her studies with Martin Krause (piano) and Rudolf Maria Breithaupt. From 1919 she taught at the Stern Conservatory. She began to attract notice as a composer in 1921 with the first performance of her Japanese songs for soprano and piano. In 1926 she went to the Berlin Hochschule für Musik to continue her composition studies with Schreker, and it was through him that she forged a strongly individual style. In 1928 she was awarded the Mendelssohn Prize for composition as well as the Schubert Grant from the Columbia Phonograph Company. She was the first woman to receive the title of honorary professor from the Austrian president (1958); later honours included the Austrian Ehrenkreuz für Wissenschaft und Kunst (...

Article

Alan Blyth

(b Hofheim am Taunus, Feb 9, 1963). German soprano . She studied with Christoph Prégardien at the Musikhochschule in Frankfurt and with Elsa Cavelti. She made her début as Valencienne in Die lustige Witwe in Heidelberg in 1988, and then worked at the Deutsche Oper am Rhein (1990–91). Her first international engagement was as Pamina with Solti at the 1991 Salzburg Festival. She later sang the role at La Scala, the Staatsoper in Munich, Dresden's Sächsische Staatsoper and the Vienna Staatsoper. She made her début at the Opéra Bastille in Paris as Susanna in 1993, followed by Sophie in 1998, and first appeared at Covent Garden in 1997 as Ighino (Palestrina). Her other roles include Ilia, Aenchen (Der Freischütz) and Countess Almaviva, which she sang to acclaim at Glyndebourne and in Zürich in 2003. Ziesak is also an accomplished soloist in concert works; she won first prize at the lieder competition at 's-Hertogenbosch, and following her Viennese recital début in ...

Article

Razia Sultanova

(b Fergana Basin, Feb 1, 1956). Uzbek dutār player. From 1970 to 1974 she attended the Fergana College of Art. From 1974 to 1979 she studied the dutār with Fakhriddin Sadyqov at the Tashkent State Conservatory, learning many pieces from the traditional classical repertory including well-known makom melodies such as Shafoat, Chohorgoh and Chully Iroq. In 1979 she began working with the Uzbek State Radio naqam ensemble founded by Yunus Rajabi. During the next two decades many of her performances were recorded for the archives of Uzbek State Radio, and in 1987 she received a Golden Gramophone award from the Melodiya recording company. Her use of ornamentation in performance has been acclaimed. She was appointed to teach at the Tashkent State Conservatory in 1991 and founded an ensemble of female dutār players in 1993, maintaining the tradition of the Fergana area where the dutār is especially associated with women....

Article

Richard Dyer

(b Paris, France, April 1, 1904; d Falmouth, MA, Sept 13, 1984). Harpist and pianist of French birth. He studied piano from the age of eight, and harp, principally under Marcel Tournier, from the age of 12. At 14 he was playing professionally in a French tango orchestra, and he later joined the orchestra of the Paris Opéra. In 1926 Sergey Koussevitzky brought him into the Boston SO, where he remained until his retirement in the summer of 1980. For 17 seasons he was also the orchestra’s staff pianist, in which post his responsibilities included assisting Koussevitzky in the preparation of new works. Between 1936 and 1942 he was active as a conductor and organized one of Boston’s first chamber orchestra series. Throughout his performing career and afterwards, Zighera was much sought after as a teacher of the harp. A master of his instrument, he produced a beautiful and unforced sound....

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

(b New York, April 14, 1945). American drummer. He began playing drums while at school and later studied theory at the Mannes College of Music. After graduation from CCNY in 1969 he moved to California, where from 1970 he appeared as a freelance with, among others, Ron McClure, Steve Swallow, Art Lande, Mike Nock, and Mel Martin, and worked regularly with Vince Guaraldi. In 1974 he returned to New York and performed in the Persian Room at the Plaza Hotel. Zigmund played drums with Bill Evans (ii) from January 1975 through 1977, and occasionally afterwards until November 1978. During his tenure with Evans he worked in a short-lived trio with Eddie Gomez and Bennie Wallace and recorded under Gomez’s leadership (1976). He then joined Richard Beirach’s trio Eon and worked as a freelance in Jim Hall’s trio (alongside Harvie Swartz), as well as with Chet Baker, Stan Getz, and others. He toured Japan in Fred Hersch’s trio with Red Mitchell in ...

Article

Roberto Pagano

(b Palermo, Nov 11, 1909; d Rome, Feb 1, 1995). Italian composer, conductor and teacher. He was director of the conservatories of Palermo, Naples and Rome, and a member of the Accademia di S Cecilia. He was also director of two important musical institutions from the time of their foundation: the Teatro Lirico Sperimentale in Spoleto and the Orchestra Sinfonica Siciliana, with which he produced interesting series of concerts, of which the Giornate di Musica Contemporanea deserve special mention. In writing his Ricordi di un musicista (Palermo, 1994) at the end of his busy career, Ziino declared that compared with other aspects of his multiple artistic personality, he considered composition to be his main musical activity. A pupil of Antonio Savasta, an exceptional teacher who instilled in him a love of counterpoint, Ziino completed his studies under Pizzetti (composition) and Bernardino Molinari (conducting). He was an active, highly competent conductor, with a repertory which ranged from orchestral music of every period and style to opera; this repertory allowed him to assimilate contemporary idioms, which he did with discernment, never merely copying famous models. A prolific composer, his melodic style – while based on Sicilian folksong – avoids the explicit quotation of folk material; his pieces show a contrast between lively, rhythmic movements and spare-textured calm adagios. Among his most important works are the ...

Article

David Fanning

(b Moscow, April 19, 1965). Russian pianist. She studied with Ada Traub at the Gnesin Special Music School from 1971 to 1983, and then with Alexander Satz at the Gnesin Institute from 1983 to 1990. Her first prize in the Busoni Competition in 1987 led to a German début in ...

Article

Klaus Kirchberg

(Karl Josef)

(b Frankfurt, Aug 18, 1881; d Würzburg, Jan 1, 1948). German composer, pianist and conductor. Born into a family of musicians, he studied at the Hoch Conservatory in his home town and then embarked on a career as a pianist. In 1908 he joined the staff of the Munich Academy of Music, and from 1920 to 1944 he was principal of the Würzburg Conservatory, where he also conducted and played a large part in the Mozart festivals founded in 1922. As a composer he represented a current of south German traditionalism that was heavily dependent on Schumann and Brahms and sometimes inclined to a popular style. Zilcher employed Impressionist harmonies on occasion, and he also drew on Baroque music and on folksong. His large output (about 100 works were published) is not always strikingly individual, but his music gives an impression of vivid inventiveness, with convincing contrapuntal thematic development....

Article

J.B. Steane

(bBussetto, June 3, 1906; d Milan, Feb 18, 1977). Italian tenor. He studied with Alfredo Cechi in Milan and in 1928 made his début there at the Dal Verme in Madama Butterfly. At Rome he sang in the première of Wolf-Ferrari’s La vedova scaltra (1931) and Mascagni’s Pinotta (1932). In that year he also made his début at La Scala, where he continued to appear until 1946. His roles there included Dmitry in Boris Godunov, Enzo in La Gioconda and Des Grieux in Manon Lescaut, in which he was widely considered to be the best of his generation. He made guest appearances at San Francisco in 1938 and travelled extensively in Europe. When Busoni’s Turandot had its Italian première in 1940 he sang the role of Calaf. He also appeared with Maria Callas in the revival of Rossini’s Armida at the Florence Festival of ...

Article

Elizabeth Forbes

(b Fagnano, Udine, Nov 11, 1864; d Havana, Jan 1901). Italian soprano . She made her début in 1887 at Ferrara as Paolina (Poliuto) and in 1889 first sang at La Scala as Camille (Zampa). There she created Alice Ford in Verdi’s Falstaff (1893...

Article

Gregory S. Dubinsky

(Petrus Ignatius)

(b Würzburg, April 1, 1905; d Hamburg, Dec 18, 1963). German composer and conductor. He studied with Schoenberg from 1925 to 1928, first privately in Vienna, then as a student at the Preussische Akademie der Künste in Berlin. He was an assistant of Kleiber’s at the Berlin Staatsoper (1927–8). He worked as a solo coach and conductor at the Staatstheater in Oldenburg (1928–32). There he helped mount one of the first performances of Berg’s Wozzeck outside a major opera house. Zillig held the post of conductor in Düsseldorf from 1932 to 1937 and in Essen from 1937 to 1940. He was then the principal musical director of the Reichsgautheater in occupied Poznań (1940–43). From 1947 to 1951 Zillig conducted at the Hessische Radio in Frankfurt, and from 1959 until his death he led the music division of NDR. As conductor and lecturer, he energetically promoted the music of Mahler, Schreker, Reger and Schoenberg, and was responsible for the first European performances of many works. Some of his radio programmes served as the basis for his survey of 20th-century music ...

Article

(b nr Kharkiv, 27 Sept/Oct 9, 1863; d New York, Dec 8, 1945). Ukrainian pianist and conductor . He studied the piano at the Moscow Conservatory with Zverev from 1871 and with Nikolay Rubinstein, Taneyev, Tchaikovsky and Hubert from 1875, graduating with a gold medal in 1881. He worked with Liszt in Weimar (1883–6), co-founded the Liszt-Verein in Leipzig, and made his professional début there in 1883. Returning in 1887, he taught at the Moscow Conservatory, where his students included Goldenweiser, Maksimov and his cousin Rachmaninoff. In this period he began work as editor for Tchaikovsky, particularly on the first and second piano concertos. He left the conservatory in May 1891 and from 1892 to 1900 lived and toured in western Europe. He also toured New York, Boston, Cincinnati and Chicago in 1898. From 1901 to 1903 Ziloti directed the Moscow PO; from 1903 to 1917...

Article

Boris Schwarz

(Alexandrovich )

(b Rostov-na-Donu, April 9, 1890; d Reno, NV, Feb 22, 1985). American violinist, composer and teacher of Russian birth . His father, a professional violinist and conductor of the Rostov Opera, taught him for the first few years. In 1901 Zimbalist joined Auer's class at the St Petersburg Conservatory, and received the Gold Medal and the Rubinstein Prize on his graduation in 1907. That year he made his débuts in Berlin (7 November) and London (9 December). He made a memorable appearance at the Leipzig Gewandhaus on 1 January 1910 under Nikisch, playing the Tchaikovsky Concerto. At his American début in Boston on 27 October 1911 Zimbalist introduced Glazunov’s Concerto. His success made him decide to settle in the USA. He married twice, in 1914 the singer Alma Gluck with whom he frequently appeared in joint recitals as a violinist and also as an expert accompanist, and in 1943...

Article

Bryce Morrison

(b Zabrze, Dec 5, 1956). Polish pianist . He studied with Andrzeij Jasinski, first privately and then at the Katowice Conservatory. He gave his first recital at the age of six and in 1975 became the youngest-ever winner of the International Chopin Competition in Warsaw. Feeling the need to expand his horizons, Zimerman worked intensively with Rubinstein, one of his greatest musical heroes, in 1976. In 1980 he curtailed his flourishing career and took a 14-month sabbatical in London. On his return to the concert platform his playing was marked by even greater freshness and vitality, which he attributes to his refusal to give more than 50 or 60 concerts a year. Among the finest pianists of his generation, he has made numerous recordings, including the Lutosławski Concerto (written for him and first performed by him in 1988), the complete Beethoven and Brahms concertos (the latter with Bernstein), much Chopin and an imaginative coupling of Liszt’s B minor Sonata with several of his later, prophetic works, including ...

Article

Vladimír Zvara

(b Ružomberk, May 16, 1926; d Bratislava, Jan 21, 1993). Slovak composer, pianist and teacher. He studied the organ, the piano with Anna Kafendová (from 1941) and composition with Suchoň at the Bratislava Conservatory before continuing his studies in composition under Farkas at the Budapest Music Academy (1948–9) and in Salzburg (1949). From 1945 to 1948 he contributed to Czechoslovak radio and, for the next four years, taught theory and the piano at the Bratislava Conservatory. Thereafter he devoted his time to composition and, exceptionally, to performance as a concert pianist.

His compositional style had its roots in the work of Suchoň, manifested by his emphasis on concise structure (based mostly on Classical or Romantic forms) and in the use of modally extended tonality, with elements of dodecaphony in works of the 1960s. After an early period of compositional constructivism and sober emotionality (as in the Concerto grosso, ...

Article

K. Thomas Brantley

(b Canton, OH, March 1, 1866; d Englewood, NJ, Dec 18, 1935). American Trombonist. Zimmerman grew up in Canton, Ohio. He left for New York City in 1896, accepting a position with the Frederick Neil Innes Band. Largely self-taught, Zimmerman became a highly sought-after soloist. In 1903, Zimmerman replaced the departing Arthur Pryor as John Philip Sousa’s trombone soloist....

Article

Sophie Fuller

(Marie Jacobina)

(b Cologne, July 5, 1847; d London, Nov 14, 1925). English pianist and composer of German birth. Her family moved to England when she was a young child. From 1857 to 1864 she attended the RAM, studying the piano with Cipriani Potter and Ernst Pauer, and composition with Charles Steggall and George Macfarren (who later wrote his third piano sonata for her); she won the King’s Scholarship in 1860 and again in 1862. She made her professional début in 1863 at the Crystal Palace, where she performed two movements of Beethoven’s ‘Emperor’ Concerto. In 1865 she gave the first of a long-running series of recitals and chamber concerts at the Hanover Square Rooms, continued from 1875 at St James’s Hall. Zimmermann was praised for her clarity and control, and was regarded as one of the country’s leading pianists. She performed regularly at the Popular Concerts in London and accompanied Joachim (the dedicatee of her first violin sonata), Neruda and Alfredo Piatti; she also made several tours of Germany....

Article

Harold Rosenthal

(b Meissen, Nov 29, 1892; d Berlin, Feb 24, 1968). German tenor . He studied in Dresden, where he made his début in 1918. Engagements in Dortmund, Brunswick and Leipzig followed; from 1925 to 1931 he was a member of the Staatsoper in Munich, and from 1931 to 1934...

Article

Margaret Campbell

(b Duisburg, Feb 27, 1965). German violinist . He studied at the Folkwang Hochschule, Essen, with Valery Gradov, the Staatliche Hochschule in Berlin with Saschko Gawrillof, and from 1980 with Hermann Krebbers in Amsterdam. He made his début in 1975 playing Mozart's G major Concerto k216, and in 1976 he won the Jugend Musiziert competition. Zimmermann subsequently appeared as a soloist throughout Europe and made his US début in 1984 with the Pittsburgh SO. He has since followed an international solo career, performing with the world's leading orchestras and conductors, and has often played in major festivals. Notable among his many recordings are Tchaikovsky's Concerto and Prokofiev's First Concerto with the Berlin PO conducted by Maazel, Mozart sonatas with Alexander Lonquich and Paganini's 24 Caprices (1985). He plays the ‘Hilton’ Stradivarius of 1691, strung with gut strings, on which he produces a beautiful, pure tone.

S. Tomes...

Article

Elizabeth Forbes

(b Buenos Aires, Aug 1942). Argentine mezzo-soprano. She studied in Buenos Aires, making her début in 1977 at the Teatro Colón as Gluck’s Orpheus, then singing Carmen and Ulrica at the Landestheater, Salzburg. She made her American début at Miami in 1979 as Delilah and her Covent Garden début in 1980 as Cherubino, and sang Rosina at San Francisco (1982). She has sung in Brussels, Naples, Madrid, Bologna, Venice, Geneva, Rome, Lyons and Paris. Her repertory includes Juno (Cavalli’s Ercole amante), Purcell’s Dido, Handel’s Agrippina and Julius Caesar, Dorabella, Idamantes, Zerlina, Sextus, Rosina (Haydn’s La vera costanza), Andromache (Ermione), Fricka and Lola. She created the title role of Piazzolla’s Maria di Buenos Aires (1987, Turcoing). Her beautiful, warm-toned voice, not large but well-projected, is particularly effective in French music: Berlioz’s Marguerite and Dido, and Massenet’s Charlotte, Dulcinée and Thérèse are among her finest roles, while she sang the Old Prioress (...