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Article

Vera Lampert

(b Budapest, Aug 28, 1928). Hungarian musicologist. He studied music in Budapest at the National Conservatory and the Academy of Music, and took a doctorate at the university in 1952 with a dissertation on manuscripts containing music in Budapest libraries. While working in the music department of the National Széchényi Library (1952–61) he was head of the music section at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (1956–61), where in 1961 he helped to establish the Bartók Archives, becoming a research assistant and then scientific secretary. In 1963 he took a kandidátus degree in musicology with a dissertation on the music of three Hungarian rhymed Offices, which in 1964 served as his Habilitationsschrift at Budapest University, where he has lectured on medieval music. After directing the music history museum at the Musicological Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (1970–73), he became assistant director and subsequently director (...

Article

William R. Lee

(b Cesarea, Turkey, Nov 29, 1859; d Thetford, VT, May 22, 1947). American music educator and scholar. Born of American missionary parents, he was educated at Robert College in Constantinople and later studied and taught piano in Worcester, Massachusetts (1880–88). He became music supervisor in Boulder, Colorado and head of the Music Department at the University of Colorado (1888–1900). Later, as head of the Music Department at Teachers College, Columbia University (1900–24), Farnsworth organized one of the pioneering bachelor’s degrees in music education (1901). Among his several books were his Education through Music (New York 1909), which was influential in teacher education, The Why and How of Music Study (New York 1927), and Short Studies in Music Psychology (New York 1930). He served on the prestigious Educational Council of the Music Supervisors National Conference and was president of the Music Teachers National Association (...

Article

Gregory F. Barz

(b Philadelphia, Aug 20, 1949). American ethnomusicologist. He was educated at Hofstra University (BA 1971), studying with Colin Turnbull, and at Indiana University, where he earned the PhD with a dissertation on sound and sentiment in 1979 under Alan Merriam. From 1980 to 1985 he was professor of communications at Pennsylvania University, after which he became professor of anthropology and music at Texas University, Austin (1985–95). In 1995 he became professor of anthropology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, until 1997 when he joined the same faculty at New York University. He has been the recipient of several honours, including a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (1991–96), and he was named a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994. His areas of research and study include language and music/speech, Papua New Guinea and West Papua, world music/world beat, the politics of music, soundscapes and acoustemology. As a performer (trombone, bass trumpet, bass trombone and euphonium), he has played and recorded since ...

Article

(b Neila, Province of Burgos, Dec 11, 1939). Spanish musicologist and choral conductor. While an intern at the Benedictine monastery of Santo Domingo de Silos he was head boy chorister. From 1958 to 1962 he studied at the Solesmes abbey, where his teachers included Dom Joseph Gajard. On returning to Silos he was appointed director of the monastic choir, which had a triumphal début in Madrid in 1972. In 1973–4 he studied the Mozarabic codices in the British Library and translated Salinas’s epochal treatise into Spanish. He resumed secular status in 1975, and in the summer of 1978, after numerous teaching appointments, joined the faculty of the Real Conservatorio Superior de Música at Madrid and in 1983 rose to tenured professor of Gregorian chant. He became a member of the three-person editorial board of the Diccionario de la música española e hispanoamericana in 1988.

Elected president of the Spanish Musicological Society in ...

Article

Amra Bosnić

(b Mostar, 1946). Bosnian and Herzegovinian musicologist. She gained the Masters in Pedagogical Sciences in the Faculty of Philosophy (1977), and the Doctorate in Pedagogical Sciences at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo (1984). She worked at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo from 1971 until her retirement in 2011. She was employed at various levels from teaching assistant to full professor at the Academy, teaching subjects including methods in music education, and pedagogy with the basics of psychology, and was appointed Dean of the Academy from 2003 until 2007. She was also engaged as a professor of Music Culture and Methods at the Pedagogical Academy in Sarajevo (1992–2009).

Ferović was actively involved in establishing and leading the most important music institutions in Sarajevo: the Musicological Society of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Institute of Musicology (2007–9) at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo, the Sarajevo vocal octet Preporod, and the academic female vocal ensemble, also called Preporod. She was an editor and reviewer of the collection of papers of the International Symposium, ...

Article

Eugène Cardine

(b Subiaco, Rome province, Dec 3, 1866; d Bologna, May 23, 1938). Italian scholar and teacher of Gregorian chant. He took his vows as a Benedictine monk at Subiaco on 12 March 1884 and was ordained priest on 20 December 1890; from 1900 to 1919 he was abbot of the monastery of S Giovanni Evangelista, Parma. In 1922 he was appointed director of the Scuola Pontificia (from 1931 the Pontificio Istituto di Musica Sacra) in Rome. Up to his death he taught every aspect of the study and practice of Gregorian chant there. He took up a subtle and prudent stance on the controversy over rhythm; in his writings, however, he seemed gradually to incline towards Mocquereau’s views. His chief work is in the first volume of the Estetica gregoriana (1934); he was engaged on a second volume at the time of his death.

Principii teorici e pratici di canto gregoriano...

Article

F.E. Kirby

(b Pirna, March 21, 1527; d Wittenberg, Dec 29, 1558). German theorist, composer, teacher and organist. He was the great-nephew of the composer Heinrich Finck. After early training, presumably in Pirna, it is thought that he joined the chapel of King Ferdinand I of Hungary and Bohemia. In 1545 he matriculated at Wittenberg University, where in 1554 he became a teacher of music. Three years later he was appointed organist in Wittenberg. He does not appear ever to have lived in Poland, as has been suggested on the basis of the dedication of his most important work, the treatise Practica musica, to members of the Gorca family (Polish nobility prominent in Wittenberg).

Finck was involved with the intellectual life of Wittenberg, then a centre of Lutheranism and humanism. In particular he gained the support of Melanchthon, two of whose poems he set to music and whose Epistola complectens commendationem musicae...

Article

Cecilia Sun

(Wallace )

(b Boston, MA, Oct 14, 1961). American musicologist. Fink received a BA summa cum laude in music from Yale University (1983), an MA in Music Theory from the Eastman School of Music (1988), and a PhD in historical musicology from the University of California, Berkeley (1994). He taught at the Eastman School of Music (1992–1998) before joining the musicology faculty at UCLA. Focusing on music after 1945, Fink’s research unites detailed musical analysis with insights drawn from cultural criticism. His primary areas of interest are minimalism and post-minimalism, popular music (especially electronic dance music and 1960s soul), and postmodernism and the canon. In his influential book Repeating Ourselves Fink eschews the formalism typically advocated by practitioners and critics. Instead he analyzes minimalist compositions within the context of postwar American consumer society by comparing them with disco, advertising strategies, innovations in hi-fi technology, and the Suzuki pedagogical method. In his articles “Elvis Everywhere” and “ORCH5” Fink turns his attention to the post-canonic musical landscape where popular and classical music (and their scholars) can no longer be segregated. He has also published on Gilbert and Sullivan’s ...

Article

Douglas Johnson

(b Butschowitz [now Boskovice], Moravia, April 4, 1804; d Vienna, June 28, 1857). Austrian music historian, pianist, composer and teacher. He had some piano lessons as a child, and in 1822 went to Vienna to study medicine while taking instruction in the piano from Anton Halm and in composition from Seyfried. After deciding on a music career in 1827, he taught the piano for many years and in 1833 joined the staff of the conservatory of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde. Although well known in his lifetime as a pianist and composer, he is remembered chiefly as a collector and as the author of several articles and monographs, including a history of piano building (Vienna, 1853). His library, one of the great private collections of the century, contained a large number of published scores, books on music theory and music manuscripts. Most of the major composers of the 18th and early 19th centuries and many of the minor ones were represented in manuscript; the concentration of manuscript sources for the works of J.S. Bach was especially impressive, including nearly 200 cantatas. After Fischhof's death his library was bought by the Berlin music dealer Julius Friedlaender, who sold most of it to the Berlin Royal (now State) Library....

Article

Jere T. Humphreys

(b Gardner, MA, June 3, 1942). American music educator and scholar. He received degrees in music education from Boston University (BM 1964, MM 1969) and in music psychology from the University of Connecticut (PhD 1973). He taught instrumental music in New England public schools (1964–74) before joining the Faculty of Music at the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada, where he served as chair of the Music Education Department (1980–85) and continues to teach and conduct research in cognitive psychology and philosophy. He also served as chair of the International Society for Music Education Research Commission (1990–92) and of the Research Alliance of Institutes for Music Education (1995–7). He has sat on the editorial boards for Psychomusicology, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Asia-Pacific Journal of Education, and Action, Criticism, and Theory. In addition to numerous papers, he is the author of five books published by The Edwin Mellen Press....

Article

Jorge Luis Acevedo Vargas

(b San José, July 28, 1937). Costa Rican composer, musicologist and teacher. His first music teacher was Carlos Enrique Vargas. He trained at the Eastman School of Music in New York (1951–64; BM, 1961, MM, 1962, PhD in composition, 1964). At the Eastman School he studied the piano with José Echániz and composition with Wayne Barlow, Bernard Rogers and Howard Hanson. After graduating he went on a research tour in Central America, and from 1965 to 1966 he taught at the Castella Conservatory of the University of Costa Rica. He taught theory at the Eastman School of Music (1966–7), then returned to Costa Rica to teach at the Castella Conservatory, the Escuela Superior de Música and the University of Costa Rica. At the university he carried out a large-scale institutional reforms and in 1971 set up degree courses in musical science and composition. He also set up the School of Musical Arts of the Rodrigo Facio University (inaugurated in ...

Article

Dennis Libby

revised by John Rosselli

(b San Giorgio Morgeto, Calabria, Oct 12, 1800; d Naples, Dec 18, 1888). Italian librarian, musicologist, teacher and composer. The varied activities of his career were dominated by a single theme: the preservation and glorification of the Neapolitan musical tradition. At 12 (or 15) he entered the Naples Conservatory, where he was a fellow student of Bellini, who became his closest friend and the object of his intense devotion. He was made archivist-librarian there in 1826 and (perhaps his most important achievement) acquired a large part of the library’s rich holdings. He also served as director of vocal concerts and singing teacher there. His widely praised Metodo di canto (Naples, ?1840; Milan, 1841–3, enlarged 3/?1861) was conservative in tendency, claiming to be based on the precepts of the castrato Crescentini, then director of the conservatory’s singing school, and intended to restore the ‘antico bello’ of ‘the only true tradition of Italian song’, that of Scarlatti, Porpora and Durante, which had been displaced by ‘la moda barocca’ of the present age. Florimo composed in all genres except the dramatic, but apart from a ...

Article

Paula Morgan

(b Portland, OR, Dec 23, 1926; d Hamden, CT, October 16, 2014). American music theorist. He was educated at Columbia University, where he received the BA in 1950 and the MA in 1952. From 1953 to 1959 he taught at Columbia University Teachers' College, and from 1957 to 1959 he was a member of the theory faculty at the Mannes College of Music. In 1959 he joined the music department of Yale University; he was appointed professor of music there in 1968. He was editor of the Journal of Music Theory between 1960 and 1967. From 1977 to 1982 he was president of the Society for Music Theory. He was named a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1995.

Forte's theoretical writings ranged from Tonal Harmony, a textbook on the underlying principles of harmonic practice, to analyses of the music of Webern. Much of his work showed the influence of Schenkerian theory. More recently he investigated the uses of set theory and computer technology in the analysis of atonal music. His interests also included the music of the 18th and 19th centuries, and American popular song....

Article

Paula Morgan

(b Gloversville, NY, July 24, 1904; d Gloversville, Oct 15, 1983). American musicologist. He studied at Cornell University, taking the AB in 1926. He was an assistant in psychology at the University of Illinois (1926–9) and then returned to Cornell, taking the PhD in 1933. He also worked at the universities of Heidelberg (1928) and Munich (1929). In 1932 he joined the faculty of the Eastman School of Music as an instructor in psychology; he taught musicology there from 1934. He was also editor of Notes (the quarterly journal of the Music Library Association, 1941–2) and the Journal of the American Musicological Society (1952–9) and was president of the MLA, 1954–6. He was made professor emeritus in 1971.

Fox wrote on both the psychology of music and historical musicology, particularly on the music of the Renaissance. A symposium was held in his honour at Eastman in ...

Article

Sanja Majer-Bobetko

(b Zagreb, May 22, 1930; d Zagreb, Dec 14, 2012). Croatian musicologist. She received the bachelor’s degree in musicology at the Ljubljana Faculty of the Humanities and Social Sciences with Dragotin Cvetko (1973) and took the PhD at the Zagreb Faculty of the Humanities and Social Sciences with Josip Silić (1994) with a dissertation on Croatian musical life, the role and the significance of the journal Danica ilirska, and terminology during the period of the national revival (1835–49). She was a piano teacher at the Zagreb Ballet School (1954–80), research assistant, then research associate at the Department of Croatian Music History of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts (1980–95). She was on the editorial board of Arti musices (1980–95).

Franković was interested primarily in 19th century Croatian music history. She researched and published on the development of lexicography, musicology, criticism, nationalism in music, and terminology, particularly in the works of Franjo Ks. Kuhač (...

Article

Paula Morgan

(Schofield)

(b Rochester, NY, Aug 26, 1935). American musicologist. He received the BA from Harvard in 1957 and began graduate studies at Princeton University, where he worked with Mendel and Strunk; he took the MFA at Princeton in 1960, and the PhD in 1967, with a dissertation on currents of change in Italian opera from 1675 to 1725. He taught at Princeton from 1963 until 1968, when he joined the music faculty of MIT. In 1973 he was appointed professor of musicology and third director of the Eastman School of Music, Rochester, and in 1997 he became president of the New England Conservatory in Boston.

Freeman's principal area of scholarly inquiry was 18th-century Italian opera and the reform of the libretto in the first third of the 18th century; he also worked on piano music of the early 19th century, and has given piano recitals in both the USA and Europe. Since moving into musical education his interests have moved towards educational issues and arts funding....

Article

Clement A. Miller

[Fries, Hans]

(b Greifensee, canton of Zürich, 1505; d Zürich, Jan 28, 1565). Swiss schoolteacher, theologian, philologist, humanist and music theorist. Between 1527 and 1531 he attended the cathedral school in Zürich on a scholarship provided by the Swiss reformer, Ulrich Zwingli. In the company of his friend the polyhistor Conrad Gesner he went to Paris in 1533 and for two years studied music and philology at the university. After spending a year teaching in the Lateinschule at Basle he returned to Zürich in 1537 as a teacher of Latin, Greek and music in the cathedral school, a position he held until his death. In order to complete his education he went to Italy in 1545. Although he visited many Italian cities, Venice was of particular importance, for there he studied Hebrew and numerous Latin and Greek manuscripts. After returning to Zürich in 1547 he reorganized musical instruction in its schools. He was interested in both sacred and secular music, and studied the lute in ...

Article

Jere T. Humphreys

(Charlotte)

(b Schleswig, Germany, Aug 27, 1946). American music educator and scholar of German birth. After graduating from the University of Hamburg and the Musikhochschule für Musik und darstellende Kunst with a Teaching License (Staatsexamen) (1970), she taught at the University of Hamburg (1970–72) while studying sociology and philosophy. In 1976 she received a PhD from the University of Texas at Austin and joined the faculty at the University of North Texas, specializing in research, philosophy and sociology of music, and comparative music education. Among her publications are Sociology for Music Teachers: Perspectives for Practice (2007) and (with her late husband Edward L. Rainbow) Research in Music Education: An Introduction to Systematic Inquiry (1987). She was on the Executive Committee of the Music Education Research Council of the Music Educators National Conference (MENC) (1980–86; coordinator of MENC Special Research Interest Groups, ...

Article

John Warrack

revised by James Deaville

(b Würzburg, May 28, 1780; d Würzburg, Jan 5, 1862). German teacher, musical organizer, critic, theorist, conductor and composer. He studied music at the student institute of the Juliusspital in Würzburg, and studied law and philosophy at the university there. In 1801 he began his career as a violinist in the prince-bishop’s court orchestra. He also founded the Akademische Bande, a student choral and orchestral group, which in 1804 became the Akademisches Musikinstitut and was made part of the university, thus becoming the basis of the first state music school in Germany. His teaching and organizational work was of the highest importance and encompassed several disciplines and activities. He became reader in aesthetics in 1812, reader in pedagogical studies in 1819 and professor in 1821. In 1820 a singing school was established as part of the institute. He also conducted important historical concerts for King Ludwig I in ...

Article

Ada Benediktovna Schnitke

(b Leningrad, Jan 27, 1936). Russian musicologist, pianist and teacher. He entered the Kazan′ Music School in 1943 following the evacuation of his family to Kazan′ in 1941. After returning to Leningrad in 1945 he continued his musical education at the Special School for Gifted Children in the class of Ė.I. Shteynbok. He studied the piano with N.Ye. Perel′man at the Leningrad Conservatory from 1953 and, after graduating in 1958, undertook postgraduate research at the conservatory with Barenboym in the history and theory of pianism (1958–61). In 1946 he gained the Kandidat degree with a dissertation entitled Chertï fortepiannogo stilya i voprosï interpretatsii fortepiannoy muzïki rannego Prokof′yeva 1908–1918 (‘Features of the Piano Style and Questions Surrounding the Interpretation of Prokofiev's Early Piano Music, 1908–18’). He was appointed to teach at the Leningrad Conservatory in 1961, later becoming a senior lecturer (1967) and professor (...