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Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama

[Chin ]

(b Nagano, Japan, March 21, 1946). Japanese double bass player and pianist. He learned piano and violin from an early age, took up guitar in his teens, and played piano in a band at Waseda University in Tokyo. At the suggestion of Sadao Watanabe he changed to double bass, then performed with Watanabe’s quartet from 1969 and with Masabumi Kikuchi’s sextet from 1971. After moving to New York (1973) he worked with Stan Getz (1974), Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers (1974–6), and the quintet of Bill Hardman and Junior Cook (1977–82); he also played with Dave Liebman, Sonny Rollins, Chet Baker, Lee Konitz, and Sonny Stitt, among others, and studied at the Juilliard School. Suzuki returned to Tokyo in 1984 and led the groups Matsuri (1984–92) and East Bounce (from 1992).

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Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Takamatsu, Japan, May 10, 1960). Japanese alto saxophonist and leader. He took piano lessons from the age of seven and played flute and conducted brass bands through his years in high school. At Okayama University, when he was 20, he taught himself to play alto saxophone. He worked as a banker after graduation and performed as an amateur for five years in Takamatsu, then moved in 1988 to Tokyo to start a professional career. There he performed with the Bop Band, led by the trumpeter Hiroshi Murata (1990–93), Tomonao Hara, Masahiko Osaka, Junko Onishi’s Jazz Workshop (1996–7), Motohiko Hino’s group Art Directions (1997–9), and the big bands of the trombonist Kenichi Tsunoda and Yoshihiko Katori. While serving, with his fellow alto saxophonist Joh Yamada, as co-leader of the group Alto Nakayoshi Koyoshi (from 1993), he established his own quartet (...

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Yamagata, Japan, Dec 24, 1931; d Tokyo, February 29, 2008). Japanese bandleader and tenor saxophonist. He played professionally from 1951 and worked at American military bases near Sendai before moving to Tokyo in the late 1950s; his early style was influenced by that of Hidehiko Matsumoto. In 1961 he joined the alto saxophonist Keiichiro Ebihara and his Lobsters, and from 1966 he led Tokyo Union, a big band that made an acclaimed recording, Scandinavian Suite, in 1977; he also appeared at the festivals in Monterey (California) and Montreux (Switzerland). Tokyo Union disbanded in 1989. From 1992 Takahashi directed student and amateur big bands, and in 1996 he formed the group Jazz Groovys. His saxophone playing owed much to the work of Sonny Rollins, and the style of his band was strongly rhythmic. He had commissioned arrangements by, among others, Slide Hampton, Chikara Ueda, and Toshiyuki Honda.

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama and Gary W. Kennedy

(b Osaka, Jan 26, 1948). Japanese pianist and leader. Her mother, a piano teacher, began to give her lessons at the age of three, and she studied classical piano through her years at Tohogakuen Music University, from which she graduated in 1972; she also played double bass while in high school. She began her professional career in 1971 in the group led by the alto saxophonist Yoshio Otomo and then performed in bands led by Yoshio Ikeda, Motohiko Hino, the alto and soprano saxophonist Hidefumi Toki, and Joe Henderson. Her first recording was made in 1978, and her second, in December 1980, was as the leader of a quartet including Dave Liebman. In 1982 she performed in New York with Cecil McBee, Bob Moses, and Sheila Jordan. Having visited Europe regularly from 1981 (she appeared with her trio at the Berlin Jazz Festival that year, performed as an unaccompanied soloist in Nuremberg in ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

[JoJo ]

(b Tokyo, Dec 22, 1932; d Tokyo, June 23, 1991). Japanese guitarist. He taught himself to play guitar during his high school years and made his professional début in 1951. In 1954, while performing with Toshiko Akiyoshi, Sadao Watanabe, and Hampton Hawes, he formed his own quartet, New Direction. From 1959 through 1965 he took a leading role in various experimental activities under the banner of Shinseiki Ongaku Kenkyusyo (New Century Music Laboratory, a forum for avant-garde musicians), and in 1961 he formed the cooperative quartet Jazz Academy with Masahiko Togashi, Masabumi Kikuchi, and another of the laboratory’s central figures, Hideto Kanai. Takayanagi formed a bossa nova band in 1967. Later in his career he founded a tango group (1989) – he performed fluently in more traditional jazz styles as well – but he mainly led bands oriented towards free jazz, including the groups Jazz Contemporary and Tee & Company. In ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, April 18, 1955). Japanese tenor saxophonist and leader. He started piano lessons at the age of three but taught himself to play tenor saxophone when he was 17; later he doubled on flute and bass clarinet. After joining Elvin Jones’s Japanese Jazz Machine (1990) he became a member of Issei Igarashi’s group (1991), Shota Koyama’s group Ichigo Ichie (1996), the band led by the Hammond organ player Toshihiko Kankawa (1998), and the saxophone quartet Saxophobia (1998). His own quartet consisted of Yutaka Shiina, Shigeo Aramaki, and Dairiki Hara from 1995, but in 1998–9 he toured and recorded with an American rhythm section of Rod Williams, Jaribu Shahid, and the drummer Eli Fountain. Takeuchi is a powerful free-jazz tenor saxophonist.

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

(b Ankara, Feb 11, 1939). Turkish drummer, percussionist, and leader. Through his mother, who played ’ūd and jumbush and performed Turkish classical music, he was introduced to traditional folk musics from Turkey, Macedonia, and the Middle East. He took up trumpet, trombone, and double bass before studying percussion at the conservatory in Ankara in the mid-1950s, and in 1955 he was inspired to play jazz after hearing Charli Persip perform with Dizzy Gillespie’s band. Around this time he began working professionally as a drummer in dance bands, with which he toured Germany, Denmark, and Sweden, and met and played with, among others, Maffy Falay, Don Cherry, Johnny Dyani, and Dollar Brand. In Sweden he worked alongside Dyani in Cherry’s trio (from 1969, recording in 1969, 1971) and was a member of Falay’s group Sevda (through summer 1972); he then joined Dyani and Mongezi Feza in Music for Xaba and toured with the group Rena Rama. From around ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Fujisawa, Japan, May 1, 1967). Japanese violinist and leader. She took violin lessons from the age of four and was inspired to become a jazz musician after hearing a recording by Bill Evans (ii), Waltz for Debby. In 1986 she began working professionally, performing and recording with Shigeharu Mukai, Mal Waldron, and others. In ...

Article

Rainer E. Lotz

(b ?Turkey, 1902; d Vienna, Oct 23, 1976). Armenian guitarist. He fled Turkey in 1921 on account of the persecution of the Armenian people and settled in Berlin, where by the 1930s he was highly sought after for concert, dance, and studio work. Among the bandleaders with whom he played and recorded were Michael Jary (1939–40), Willy Berking (1939–42), Kutte Widmann (1940–41), Horst Winter and Helmuth Zacharias (both 1941–2), Benny de Weille (1941–3), and Primo Angeli and Willy Stech (both 1942–3). His most significant recordings were made as a leader in 1941 with personnel from the bands of Ernst van ’t Hoff and Jean Omer, and include his own arrangement of Lieselott (Pallas 1205). Tevelian moved to Vienna in 1943 and later left music to work for an oil company. (K. Schulz: “Sehen Sie, ich lebe weiter: die Meg Tevelian-Story,” ...

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

Record label. Its parent company, TBM, was established in Japan in June 1970 by Takeshi (“Tee”) Fuji, and by 1999 its headquarters were in Yokohama. Its more than 130 albums include recordings by such musicians as Hiroshi Fukumura, Nobuo Hara, Motohiko Hino, Terumasa Hino, Masaru Imada, Hideto Kanai, Fumio Karashima, George Kawaguchi, Hidehiko Matsumoto, Kosuke Mine, Toshiyuki Miyama, Kenji Mori, Teruo Nakamura, Toshio Oida, Shunzo Ono, George Otsuka, Isao Suzuki, Tatsuya Takahashi, Masayuki Takayanagi, Takao Uematsu, and Tsuyoshi Yamamoto....

Article

Yozo Iwanami

revised by Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, March 22, 1940; d Kanagawa, Japan, August 22, 2007). Japanese drummer, percussionist, composer, and leader. His father played double bass. He learned violin from the age of six, took up drums and made his début as a drummer with his father’s swing band when he was 14, and then moved into other jazz styles. After playing bop with Sadao Watanabe and his Cozy Quartet (1956) and working with Toshiko Akiyoshi and Tony Scott (1950s) he formed the group Jazz Academy (1961), with Hideto Kanai, Masabumi Kikuchi, and Masayuki Takayanagi. He was active as a leader from 1965, when Yosuke Yamashita appeared as his sideman in what is considered to be the first Japanese free-jazz group, and he accompanied such visitors to Japan as Sonny Rollins, Ornette Coleman, Lee Morgan, and Blue Mitchell. An accident in 1969 left him unable to play drums, and the following year he played percussion exclusively; he also wrote compositions that show a strong oriental influence. Togashi resumed performing as a drummer in the mid-1970s and toured and recorded with Don Cherry and Charlie Haden in Europe in ...

Article

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

(b Philadelphia, Oct 3, 1956). Pianist. Her father was African American and her mother Japanese American, and she later took her mother’s maiden name as a stage name. She left high school at the age of 15 and moved to Boston, where she had lessons with Margaret Chaloff and Charlie Banacos. In 1973 she lived in Connecticut and then Detroit, where she studied and performed with Marcus Belgrave. Having returned to Philadelphia (1974) she studied at the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts and received private tuition from Bernard Peiffer, Mary Lou Williams, Stanley Cowell, and Dennis Sandole; she performed in local clubs and worked with various musicians, including Odean Pope and Philly Joe Jones. In 1983 she moved to New York and attended the New School for Social Research and performed as an unaccompanied soloist at a SoHo supper club in Green Street. She made her first recording as a leader in ...

Article

John Voigt

[Nabil (Marshall) ]

(b Ramallah, Transjordan [now Jordan], April 5, 1930). American double bass player. His nickname is often misspelled Knobby. He emigrated to the USA in 1944 to attend school in Providence, Rhode Island, studied political science at Haverford College (graduated 1952), and took up double bass in 1953. While serving in the US Army he was a member of a military band and played in Japan with Hampton Hawes and Toshiko Akiyoshi (1953–4). In 1954 he worked briefly with Charlie Parker, and the following year he undertook his first engagements with Gene Krupa and Johnny Smith, with both of whom his association continued for many years; he also performed with Les Elgart (1955) and Cy Coleman (1955–7), performed and recorded with Zoot Sims (at intervals, 1956–9), and worked with Eddie Costa (1957), Herbie Mann (1958–61), Bobby Hackett (with whom he appeared in the television show “Bobby Hackett,” ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, March 5, 1944). Japanese trumpeter, singer, and leader. At the age of 13 he taught himself to play trumpet, mainly influenced by Hollywood films featuring jazz. A specialist in New Orleans jazz and the playing and singing style of Louis Armstrong, he graduated in 1966 from Waseda University in Tokyo, where he was very active in the New Orleans Jazz Club. He lived in New Orleans from 1968 to 1969 with his wife, Keiko, who plays banjo and piano, and studied under and performed with many legendary players, including George Lewis (i), Jim Robinson, and Danny Barker. In summer 1970 he led a band in Osaka, then in 1971 and 1972 he toured Europe and the USA as a member of Barry Martyn’s New Orleans Jazz Band. After returning briefly to New Orleans and then in spring 1973 to Japan, Toyama led his Dixieland Saints from ...

Article

(b Galataria, nr Istanbul, Aug 4, 1957). Armenian percussionist. He has worked under both spellings of his surname. At the age of 11 he began performing professionally in bands with his older brother, and from around 1972 he worked in Europe. Later he moved to New York (c1981), and he eventually settled in New Jersey. In the mid-1980s he became a member of Ed Schuller’s ensembles, and he played in Gust William Tsilis’s group Alithea (recording in 1986) and in Armen Donelian’s quintet (1986–91). In addition he performed with Al Di Meola’s band World Sinfonia (from 1990), Marc Johnson’s Right Brain Patrol (from 1991 into mid-1990s), Arthur Blythe (from c1991), and Hank Roberts’s trio Little Motor People (recording in 1992); he took part in recording sessions with Jim Pepper (1988), Mitch Watkins (1989), Dino Saluzzi and Ellery Eskelin (both ...

Article

Mark Lomanno

(b Hamamatsu, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, March 26, 1979). Japanese pianist. Hiromi began piano studies at age five with a teacher who encouraged her to improvise and introduced her to the recordings Erroll Garner, Oscar Peterson, and Art Tatum. In her teenage years, she performed with the Czech National Symphony, and in Tokyo at the personal invitation of Chick Corea, with whom she has maintained an ongoing collaboration. After briefing studying law, she relocated to Boston in 1999 and enrolled in the Berklee College of Music. Richard Evans, her composition and arranging professor, shared a recording of hers with Ahmad Jamal, who, along with Evans, produced her debut CD, Brain (Telarc, 2003). Known for her masterful virtuosity (which invites comparisons to another mentor, Oscar Peterson), genre-crossing arrangements, and imaginative, highly energetic live performances, Hiromi constantly refines her orchestration of sonic possibilities—using keyboards with individually crafted sounds and the full range of all the instruments in her ensembles, such as in ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Tokyo, April 16, 1947). Japanese tenor saxophonist. Self-taught, he played clarinet and alto saxophone from the age of 13 and later specialized on the tenor instrument. From 1965 he performed in the groups led by the drummer Akira Ishikawa, the guitarist Kiyoshi Sugimoto, George Otsuka, Terumasa Hino (at the Berlin Jazz Festival, ...

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Kazunori Sugiyama and Barry Kernfeld

[Dr. Umezu; Kappo]

(b Sendai, Japan, Oct 17, 1949). Japanese alto saxophone and reed player. He took up clarinet at the age of 12 and later majored in the instrument at Kunitachi College of Music, Tokyo, graduating in 1972; while still a student he played with Toshinori Kondo’s trio. From 1974 to 1976 he lived in New York, where he performed with Oliver Lake, Arthur Blythe, Ahmed Abdullah, and Ted Daniel, among many others. Upon returning to Japan he formed, with the pianist Yoriyuki Harada, the Seikatsu Kojo Iinkai Orchestra, a group which enjoyed great popular success until it disbanded in 1981; his next group, DUB (Dr. Umezu Band), also achieved wide popularity. In the 1980s he joined R. C. Succession, a popular Japanese rock band. From 1988, when DUB disbanded, Umezu led various ensembles, including the seven-piece group Shakushain (formed in 1989), an 18-piece klezmer orchestra, Betsuni Nanmo Klezmer (from ...

Article

Wim van Eyle

(b The Hague, Jan 1, 1930). Dutch trumpeter and flugelhorn player. He first toured with a big band at the age of 16, performing for troops in Indonesia. He attended the Royal Conservatory in The Hague (1947–50) and played with Ernst van ’t Hoff (1951) while working in the Arnhem Symphony Orchestra. In 1954 he joined a sextet led by his brother, the trumpeter Jerry van Rooyen, and then was a member of the Ramblers (1955–7). He worked in France with Aimé Barelli (1957–60), Kenny Clarke, Lucky Thompson, Barney Wilen, and others, and in Germany for Sender Freies Berlin as a member of a sextet which included Herb Geller, Jerry van Rooyen, and Cees See (1960–67); he also played with Hans Koller and Åke Persson. From 1967 to 1978 he lived in Stuttgart, where he joined Erwin Lehn’s orchestra and Wolfgang Dauner’s Radio Jazz Group; he was a founding member of Peter Herbolzheimer’s Rhythm Combination and Brass (...