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Esanjo  

F.J. de Hen

[esanji, esandjo, esanyo, esanza]

Lamellaphone of the Bwende, Konda, Kota, Mbole, Mongo, Ngbaka, Ngombe and Oli of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has seven to 12 metal tongues, sometimes made of umbrella stiffeners, fastened to a box resonator. The ezanza, or esanzo, of the Bonkoso Mongo is a flat-board lamellaphone (LaurentyS...

Article

Gabus  

Article

David K. Rycroft

revised by Andrew Tracey

[!gama-kha:s]

Musical bow, with separate resonator, of the Bergdama of Namibia. It is a simple bow with a string originally of sinew, now of nylon. One end rests on a hollow wooden block or serving dish resting upside down on the ground, and the other end against the player’s chin. The right forefinger plucks the string and a second performer can tap the lower part of the string with a stick. Pitch is changed by bending the stave with the left hand to alter the tension of the string. Among the Damara of Namibia, where it is called ...

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Gangana  

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Gara  

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Gbessi  

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

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F.J. de Hen

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Whistle of the Pende people of the south-western Democratic Republic of the Congo. The elongated tronco-conical wooden body is about 30 cm long. The upper part is slightly dilated and has one or two fingerholes on the sides.

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Gibinji  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Lamellaphone of the Kwango-Kasayi region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The 8 to 12 wooden or bamboo tongues and their bridges are tied with rattan to three bars of a very soft wood, the middle one sometimes shorter than the others, nailed together in the form of a raft. The Pende call it ...

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Ferdinand J. de Hen

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Gonongo  

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Gude  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Set of whistles of the Boa people in the Uele region, Democratic Republic of the Congo. The beautifully carved whistles, usually seven or eight, from about 2 to 11 cm long, are strung on a cord and hung around the player’s neck.

J.S. Laurenty: Systématique des aérophones de l’Afrique centrale...

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Guere  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

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Guinbri  

Lucy Durán

[gimbri, gmbri, gnibra, gombri, gumbri, gunbri, gunibri]

Large plucked half-spike lute with one to three strings, of North Africa. It is particularly an instrument of the Gnawa brotherhood of Morocco, among whom it has three strings. The neck protrudes into the resonator where its end, accessible through the soundhole, is cut into three spikes to which the strings, traditionally of sheep’s gut but now often nylon, are attached. At the upper end the strings are tied to leather bands around the neck; these can be adjusted for tuning. In construction the guinbri is clearly related to the family of plucked lutes found throughout the West African savanna, although it is somewhat larger and the resonator is rectangular, about 15 cm wide and deep but sometimes narrower and slightly waisted. The soundtable is camel or cowhide and the wooden bridge is higher than is normal for plucked instruments. The instrument’s ancestry might be traced to the ancient Egyptian long-necked lute. The Moroccan ...

Article

Gule  

Konin Aka

[goule, ule, kule, kwi]

Ceremonial slit drum of the Guere, Niabua, and Wobe peoples of the Ivory Coast. In the music of the secret kwi (‘spirit’) society the player holds a mirliton in his mouth and conducts a dialogue with the gule, which is later used for purely rhythmic accompaniment. The Guere also play the ...

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Gulu  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Tulip-shaped slit drum of the Mamvu people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The upper side is about 60 cm long. The term also refers to a zoomorphic slit drum of the Mamvu, Angba, and Mangbele of the northern DRC.

J.S. Laurenty: Les tambours à fente de l’Afrique centrale...

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Gundi  

Ferdinand J. de Hen