161-180 of 3,329 results  for:

Clear all

Article

revised by Martin Marks

(b New York, NY, 19 April 1888; d Ukiah, CA, 13 Feb 1959). Composer and conductor. After private music study in Berlin, he conducted for Oscar Hammerstein's Manhattan Opera Company, which closed in 1910, and then for productions on Broadway. By 1921 he had become an assistant conductor at the Capitol Theater, where silent films were presented with full orchestral accompaniment; in 1923, in partnership with David Mendoza, he replaced Erno Rapée as principal conductor. In addition to conducting, he composed incidental film music for the Capitol as needed, including 57 pieces published in the Capitol Photoplay Series (New York, 1923–7). From 1925 to 1929 he collaborated with Mendoza in New York on compilation scores for at least 20 MGM films, beginning with The Big Parade. Their collaboration continued with the music for Don Juan (1926), the first feature film score to be presented using the Vitaphone process, which mechanically synchronized the playback of music recorded on wax discs with the projection of the film. In ...

Article

Robert Stevenson

(b Abalá, Yucatán, July 21, 1906; d Veracruz, June 20, 1975). Mexican conductor and composer. He studied at the Conservatorio Nacional de Música, Mexico City (1927–32), where he was a violin pupil of Revueltas and a composition pupil of Chávez. There he allied himself with Contreras, Galindo Dimas and Moncayo in the ‘Group of Four’. From 1931 to 1937 he played second violin in the Mexico SO, and he then directed a chorus in Morelia for two years. Returning to Yucatán in 1940, he quickly took a leading part in all aspects of musical life. He was director of the newly reorganized Mérida SO (inaugural concert 15 November 1944), of the Típica Yukalpetén, of the official state band, of the Yucatán Conservatory (from 1944) and of the Veracruz School of Music (from 1955); later he also worked for the Veracruz Institute of Fine Arts. He composed relatively little after ...

Article

Elijah Wald

[Ramón Covarrubias]

(b Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico, Dec 8, 1945). Mexican accordionist, singer, and bandleader. Born in Monterrey and raised in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, Ramón Ayala has been the foremost figure in norteño music along the Gulf Coast and Texas border region since the 1970s. He first became famous in the 1960s as the accordionist and coleader of Los Relámpagos del Norte, with the singer-songwriter Cornelio Reyna; then formed his own band, Los Bravos del Norte, in 1971. In Mexico, Ayala is regarded as part of a great generation of border bandleaders, along with Carlos y José and Los Cadetes de Linares. North of the border, though, he has far outstripped his peers, and only California’s Los Tigres del Norte rival his ongoing popularity. Unlike the Tigres, who have consistently pushed norteño in new directions, Ayala is a traditionalist, and his success is due as much to his image as a hard-working, old-fashioned bearer of the classic tradition as to his intricate accordion passages and his keen eye for good material, from gunfighter corridos to romantically mournful ...

Article

Barry Kernfeld

(b Cleveland, July 13, 1936; d ?New York, between 5 and Nov 25, 1970). American jazz tenor saxophonist and bandleader. He began on the alto saxophone and was playing professionally in black rhythm-and-blues bands by his mid-teens. While serving in army concert bands, he changed over to the tenor saxophone. He occasionally played in Paris clubs while stationed in France in 1960–61. After his discharge, he remained in Europe, leading a bop trio for eight months in Sweden and playing with Cecil Taylor in winter 1962–3 in Copenhagen. In 1963 he moved to New York, where he performed infrequently with Taylor. In summer 1964 he formed a quartet with Don Cherry, Gary Peacock and Sunny Murray which toured Europe later that year.

Ayler was never to find a steady audience for his radical music – his group appeared perhaps only three times in 1965 – and, although his albums were well received by the critics, he remained poor. He made no effort to clarify his music for listeners, actively discouraging musical interpretations of his recordings and instead stressing their social and spiritual issues; the inconsistent and confusing titles to his pieces further obscured his work (see Litweiler). Nevertheless, in studios and New York clubs (...

Article

Lise Waxer

(b Santa Clara, Feb 11, 1893; d Havana, Jan 20, 1943). Cuban pianist and bandleader. As the leader of the Havana Casino Orchestra he is best known for having launched the El manicero (‘Peanut Vendor’) craze in the United States after his band performed this number at New York’s Palace Theater on 26 April 1930. Written by Moises Simon, the song became an instant hit, and within a year popular jazz artists such as Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington had recorded versions of the tune. Expanding upon the traditional Cuban conjunto (sextet or septet), Azpiazú’s band was a 14-piece dance orchestra with trumpets, saxophones, trombone, tuba, piano, bass and Cuban percussion. Although Latin bands already existed in New York, his was the first group to be successful with the non-Latino public, helping to catalyze the rhumba dance craze that lasted throughout the decade. The Havana Casino Orchestra recorded popular versions of other tunes such as ...

Article

Thomas Kaufman

(b Ravenna, 1863; d Atlantic City, NJ, July 1907). Italian conductor, composer and impresario. His career was largely spent in touring Latin America and the Caribbean, mostly as the conductor for other impresarios, sometimes as both conductor and impresario of his own company.

His four-act opera Ermengarda, to a libretto by P. Martini, had its première at the Teatro Andreani in Mantua on 27 November 1886. Azzali embarked for Colombia in 1891. A six-month season in Bogotá as conductor and musical director for the Zenardo-Lambardi company was followed by an extended tour of the country and another season in the capital in 1893. During that season his Lhidiak (2, V. Fontana), based on an Indian legend, the first opera to be written for Colombia, had its première at the Teatro Colón (12 August). In April 1895 he started another tour that included Guatemala City, Quezaltenango, Bogotá and Medellin. In ...

Article

William Berz

(b Atlanta, IL, Sept 2, 1892; d April 10, 1972). American conductor and author. Bachman’s career included leadership positions of college, military, and professional bands. He received his academic training at the North Dakota Agricultural College (1914–16) where he led the student cadet band. At this time, he toured with several professional bands as cornetist, including Bohumir Kryl’s Concert Band. During World War I, Bachman served as bandleader of the 116th Engineer Band. After the war he organized and conducted a professional concert band, Bachman’s Million Dollar Band. Between 1928 and 1942, the band had headquarters in Chicago and toured extensively each year. He was director of bands at the University of Chicago from 1935 to 1942. In 1942, Bachman was recalled to military duty as the head of band music in the Pacific Theater, retiring as lieutenant colonel after the war. He was appointed director of bands at the University of Florida, serving from ...

Article

Irina Boga

(b Bucharest, Romania, Dec 10, 1947) Romanian-born conductor. After studying the violin at the Bucharest Conservatory, he continued his studies at the Conservatoire Royal de Musique in Liége with Lola Bobescu. He channelled his interest towards orchestra conducting, completing his education in Brussels and then at the Mozarteum (Salzburg) under the supervision of Herbert von Karajan, then later on at the Juilliard School (New York), where he was mentored by Leonard Bernstein. He was appreciated as both an opera and symphonic conductor on three continents; in Europe (at the Royal Philharmonic and BBC Symphony in London, the Residentie Orchestra, Amsterdam Philharmonic, and the Radio and l’Ile de France orchestras in Paris, the Orchestra Nationale in Lyons, the RAI in Turin, Santa Cecilia in Rome, Maggio Musicale orchestras in Florence, etc.), North America (in Pittsburgh, Washington D.C., Atlanta, Detroit, Baltimore, Rochester and Montreal), and Asia (the Hong Kong Philharmonic and the Tokyo Philharmonic). Admired for his dramatic vitality and the accuracy of the his phrasing, he is considered a specialist in the Italian and French repertory of lyrical theatre; in only the last decade he had over 170 performances at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, along with having conducted shows at Covent Garden and Royal Opera House in London, the Vienna Opera, the lyrical theatres in Munich, Hamburg, Geneva, Brussels, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Turin, Bologna, Lyon, Houston, Dallas, Toronto, Montreal, Baltimore, and Detroit. His recording of the opera ...

Article

Sophie Fuller

(b Camborne, July 18, 1941). English composer and conductor. She studied the clarinet, piano, conducting and composition at the RAM from 1959 to 1963. In 1971 she became a freelance composer, conductor and lecturer. Many of her large-scale works, such as the orchestral tone poem Trencrom (1978...

Article

(b London, Oct 6, 1912; d Farnham, Surrey, Feb 2, 1997). English musicologist, conductor and instrumentalist, brother of the double-bass player and composer Francis Baines. During his education at Westminster School (King’s Scholar, 1925–30), his musical talents became evident, encouraged by the school director of music, C. Thornton Lofthouse. In 1930 he went to Christ Church, Oxford, where he studied natural sciences and graduated with honours in chemistry in 1933. The award of an open scholarship to the RCM changed the direction of his career, and after two years’ study devoted mainly to the bassoon he joined the LPO as third bassoon and double bassoon in 1935. This appointment (interrupted by six years’ army service) continued until 1948 and led to his election as assistant conductor in 1949. The following year he became associate conductor to the International Ballet Company, but remained a regular conductor of the LPO Schools Concerts. Between ...

Article

William Berz

(Rusty)

(b Olney, IL, Jan 6, 1888; d Evanston, IL, Oct 4, 1974). American conductor and arranger. Bainum began his study of music at age ten playing trombone and alto horn. He attended the University of Illinois, studying English and engineering, and played bass drum in the band under A.A. Harding. After teaching high school for a year, he became director of music at Southern Illinois Normal University (1914–22). Bainum worked toward completing a B.A. in music while serving as Harding’s first assistant director (1922–4), then became director of music for the Grand Rapids (MI) public schools (1924–6). In 1926 he was appointed director of bands at Northwestern University, a position he held until his retirement in 1953. From 1942–5, Bainum was Chief of the United States Army Overseas Music Branch of Special Services, responsible for music in the European theater.

Many of his band arrangements are widely performed, ...

Article

Francis Jackson

(b Huddersfield, Aug 22, 1874; d York, May 1, 1946). English organist, composer and conductor. He studied with John Farmer of Balliol College, Oxford, and was articled to Frederick Bridge at Westminster Abbey, where he received organ tuition from the assistant organist Walter Alcock. In 1893 Bairstow became organist of All Saints, Norfolk Square, and in 1899 of Wigan parish church. In Wigan he built up a teaching practice, concentrating particularly on singing, and successfully directed the town’s Philharmonic and other choral societies. On being appointed to Leeds parish church in 1907, he became organist to the Leeds Festival of that year and of 1910 and, later, conductor of the Leeds Philharmonic Society (from 1917 until his death). In 1913 he was appointed organist at York Minster, and from then until 1939 he directed the York Musical Society. His conducting engagements took him further afield; his appearances in London included a notable concert with the Royal Choral Society, in ...

Article

Fatima Hadžić

[Ljubo]

(b Mostar, Bosnia, July 31, 1890; d Kasindo (near Sarajevo), 1951). Bosnian composer, choir conductor, and music educator. He attended the private school of music Glasbena škola F. Matějovský in Sarajevo. His music studies at the Imperial Academy of Music and the Performing Arts in Vienna (1910–11) and his studies in composition at the Royal National Hungarian Academy of Music in Budapest (1911–13) were interrupted due to his financial problems. In Sarajevo, he conducted the choirs of the Serbian Singing Society, ‘Sloga’ (1914–32), the Jewish singing society, ‘Lira’ (1927–31), and the Singing Society of Railwaymen, ‘Jedinstvo’. In 1920, he founded and conducted the Serbian Singing Society, ‘Petar Veliki Oslobodioc’, in Novo Sarajevo. From its foundation in 1920 until 1941 he worked as a teacher of piano and music theory in the District School of Music. He also worked as a music teacher in the First Gymnasium (...

Article

Alena Němcová

(b Fryšták, nr Holešov, Feb 12, 1897; d Brno, April 1, 1958). Czech conductor. At Brno he studied composition with Janáček (1912–15), conducting with Neumann (1919–20) and the piano with Vilém Kurz. He was engaged as a répétiteur and conductor in the Brno Opera in 1920, making his début with Gluck’s Orfeo, and in 1925 gave the première of Martinů’s ballet Who is the Most Powerful in the World?, which drew him towards new music. During the 1925–6 season he was an organist and accompanist in Philadelphia. He then worked in Czechoslovak Radio, where he conducted the (abridged) première of Janáček’s Fate in 1934, and in 1937 became chief conductor of the Brno RSO, that year touring the USSR and Latvia. From 1929 to 1931 he was conductor of Brno Opera, where in 1930 he gave the première of Janáček’s posthumous From the House of the Dead...

Article

Noël Goodwin

( b Amsterdam, Jan 14, 1945). Dutch conductor . He studied at the Amsterdam Conservatory and began his career as a violinist, later working with Franco Ferrara and Bruno Rigacci at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena, and also with Kiril Kondrashin. His first conducting appointments were with the Amsterdam PO as associate conductor and the Netherlands CO as principal guest conductor. He has toured extensively in Europe and the USA, and in Britain with the BBC PO and BBC Welsh SO. His ENO début was in 1986 with Aida, and he returned for Fidelio in 1988; he has also conducted several productions for the WNO. He has a regular association as principal guest conductor with the Bournemouth SO and became principal conductor of the Netherlands RSO in 1993. He has also appeared frequently with the Netherlands Opera, and has conducted operatic performances in San Diego and Vancouver. His conducting is direct and unfussy, although singers have sometimes been disconcerted by his erratic tempos. Among his recordings are Mascagni's ...

Article

Jonas Westover

(b England, c1820s, d Brooklyn, NY, Dec 10, 1888). Composer, conductor, arranger, and violinist, active in the United States. The date and specific location of his birth remain unknown, but Baker’s youth was spent in England. By age seven he showed enough promise on the violin to merit the attention of Princess Augusta, who secured him a place at the Royal Academy of Music in London. There he studied violin under the tutelage of Francois Cramer and Paolo Spagnoletti. Baker also learned piano, composition, and harmony with Thomas Attwood, with whom Baker claimed to have studied many of Mozart’s manuscripts. As a violinist, Baker made his début at the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden on 4 June 1832, while his conducting career began in 1840 with a concert at the Queen’s Concert Rooms, London. Shortly afterwards, he performed as concertmaster and violin soloist with the orchestra of Philippe Musard. Baker would reprise these two roles under the direction of Louis Jullien, for whom he also arranged several pieces of music. During this period, Baker had begun to compose, and Jullien himself published some of his earliest works. Though the start date of Baker’s contract with Jullien is not clear, he was still working with the conductor on his tour to the United States in the spring of ...

Article

Stuart Campbell

( b Nizhniy Novgorod, Dec 21, 1836/Jan 2, 1837; d St Petersburg, 16/May 29, 1910). Russian composer, conductor, teacher and pianist .

Balakirev was the son of a minor government official. His musical education began with his mother’s piano tuition and proceeded to a course of summer lessons in Moscow with Aleksandr Dubuque. At that time the leading musical figure and patron in Nizhniy Novgorod (and author of books on Mozart and Beethoven) was Aleksandr Ulïbïshev, and it was through his household pianist and musical organizer Karl Eisrich that Balakirev’s induction to music, embracing the crucial discoveries of Chopin and Glinka, continued. Eisrich and Ulïbïshev provided Balakirev with further opportunities to play, read and listen to music, and to rehearse other musicians in orchestral and choral works, including, when he was 14, Mozart’s Requiem. His first surviving compositions date from the age of 15. Balakirev’s formal education began at the Gymnasium in Nizhniy Novgorod and continued after his mother’s death in ...

Article

Thomas H. Schleis

(b Hoffnungsthal, nr Olmütz [now Olomouc, Czech Republic], Feb 26, 1825; d Chicago, April 17, 1899). Moravian conductor and composer, active in the USA. He studied music at Hoffnungsthal and later at the gymnasium and university in Olomouc, where he was a choirboy at the cathedral. From 1845 he studied music (under Sechter and Proch) and law at the University of Vienna, where he worked as a music copyist and a tutor. During the 1848 revolution he sided with the Academic Legion, and following its defeat he fled Europe. He arrived in New York in 1849 and went via Chicago to Milwaukee, where he organized a male chorus (1849) and a string quartet (1850). From 1850 to 1860 he was musical director of the Milwaukee Musical Society (Musikverein) and conducted its first concert (May 1850) and its first oratorio, Haydn's The Creation...

Article

Richard R. Bunbury

(b Easthampton, MA, March 27, 1872; d Canaan, NH, Sept 30, 1943). American composer, organist, conductor, and music educator. He graduated from Williston Seminary in Northampton, Massachusetts (1890), and studied music in Boston with George W. Chadwick and others (1890–93). He then returned to Northampton and became a church musician, recitalist, school music supervisor (beginning in 1899), and director of the Vocal Club of Northampton (1894–1904). In 1900 he took over the Institute of Music Pedagogy, a summer program for training school music supervisors. In 1904 he became a church music director, organist, and school music supervisor in Hartford, Connecticut, eventually moving to the Immanuel Congregational Church of Hartford (1917). He also founded and directed the all-male Choral Club of Hartford (1907–37), and directed the Mendelssohn Glee Club of New York City (1923–34). He received honorary degrees from Trinity College in Hartford (BA ...

Article

Barry Kernfeld

(b Stevensville, MT, March 20, 1916; d San Francisco, Oct 26, 1989). American pianist and bandleader. As a teenager he went with his family to Santa Clara, California, and in 1938 he moved to San Francisco, where he immediately began working professionally. He played traditional jazz with Turk Murphy (1942) and, after a brief period of army service, Lu Watters (1943) and performed and recorded with Bunk Johnson (1943–4). He led his own bands (1944–9), performed and recorded with Bob Scobey and Murphy again (December 1947, 1949–50), rejoined Watters (1949), and later worked with Marty Marsala (1954). Bales recorded as a leader in 1949, 1950, and 1957, and in 1958 and 1959 led bands at the first two Monterey jazz festivals, accompanying Lizzie Miles in the latter year. As an unaccompanied soloist he made recordings in ...