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Adriano Mazzoletti

(b Spilimbergo, Italy, 1911; d Asti, Italy, c1977). Italian guitarist and leader. He played guitar from the age of six. In 1934 he recorded as an unaccompanied soloist and in 1938 formed a group that later became the Quintetto Ritmico di Milano; this was modeled after the Quintette du Hot Club de France and included three guitars (of which Zuccheri played the lead), a violin (from ...

Article

Wolfgang Suppan

(b Vienna, July 2, 1896; d Locarno, Switzerland, April 24, 1965). Austrian musicologist and conductor, active in the USA. Possibly a member of the Schenker's circle of students in Vienna as early as 1912, Zuckerkandl studied the piano with Richard Robert and after army service during World War I, was a free-lance conductor in Vienna, 1920–29. In 1927 he took the doctorate in musicology, with a dissertation on the methods of instrumentation in Mozart's works. (He also took art history and philosophy as secondary subjects.) He was a music critic for the Ullstein-Blätter, an editor for the publisher Bermann-Fischer (1927–33) and taught music theory at the Vienna Music Academy until 1938. After fleeing Austria, he taught at Wellesley College (1942) and then worked as a machinist in an arms factory in Boston. In 1946 he became a music theory teacher at the New School of Social Research, New York and in ...

Article

Sergio Durante

( fl 1678–85). Italian soprano . She sang in Venice in 1678 in Carlo Pallavicino’s Vespasiano for the opening of the Teatro S Giovanni Grisostomo. Thereafter her name appears only in librettos of Neapolitan productions, including the first performances of Alessandro Scarlatti’s Aldimiro, o vero Favor per favore and Psiche, o vero Amore innamorato...

Article

James Chute

revised by Jonas Westover

(b Cambridge, MA, Sept 25, 1944). American Flutist. She studied English at Barnard College (1962–4) before attending the Juilliard School, where she studied flute with Julius Baker (1964–6). In 1968 she married the violinist Pinchas Zukerman (they divorced in 1985). Under the sponsorship of the Young Concert Artists Auditions, which she won in 1970, she made her Town Hall debut in 1971. Her most regular musical partner has been Zukerman, whom she has joined in concerts with the English Chamber Orchestra (among others), occasional recitals, and a number of recordings. In 1976 she collaborated with the flutist Jean-Pierre Rampal in a concert at Carnegie Hall. She has also performed with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, the Spoleto Festival (Italy), the Mostly Mozart Festival (New York), the Edinburgh Festival, and a wide range of orchestras. She has served as the artistic director of the Vail Valley Music Festival since ...

Article

Noël Goodwin

(b Tel-Aviv, July 16, 1948). Israeli violinist of Polish descent. His father, also a violinist, encouraged a childhood instinct for music, and at eight he entered the Tel-Aviv Academy of Music, where he studied with Ilona Feher, a pupil of Hubay. In 1961 he was heard by Isaac Stern and Pablo Casals, on whose recommendations he received scholarships enabling him to enter the Juilliard School of Music, New York, with Stern as his legal guardian. There Zukerman studied with Ivan Galamian and extended his interest to the viola, the better to participate in chamber ensembles. He appeared at the 1966 Spoleto Festival in Italy, and the next year was joint winner of the Leventritt Memorial Competition. The resulting solo engagements throughout North America were supplemented by deputizing for an indisposed Stern, and since Zukerman’s New York début at Lincoln Center in 1969 he has toured frequently in Europe. His British concert début was at the ...

Article

Michael Steinberg

(b Brooklyn, NY, 22 Oct 1943; d Hong Kong, 6 June 2017). American violinist and conductor. He started music lessons when he was three and studying the violin at the age of four. Two years later he first played in public, and at seven became a student of Galamian. He made his first orchestral appearance in 1953 with the New Haven SO, and a formal début recital at Carnegie Hall in 1956. He specialized in 20th-century music and had complete command of new and traditional virtuoso techniques. He gave the premières of concertos by Sessions (for violin, cello, and orchestra), Wuorinen (for amplified violin and orchestra), and the Scottish composer Iain Hamilton, and of works by Babbitt, Carter, Crumb, Wuorinen, and others. From 1963 to 1976 he performed frequently with the pianist Gilbert Kalish, with whom he was associated in a repertory of over 300 works. One of the original Creative Associates at the Center for Creative and Performing Arts, SUNY, Buffalo, in ...

Article

Jacques Aboucaya

[Z, Bojan ]

(b Belgrade, Feb 2, 1968). Serbian pianist and composer. He discovered jazz in 1984 and quickly became one of the busiest pianists in Belgrade. After gaining a scholarship to the University of Michigan (1986) he spent time with Clare Fischer, under whose influence he renewed his approach to the piano. In the course of his service in the Serbian army (1987) he directed an ethnic music orchestra, and this supplied further inspiration for his music making. In 1988 he settled in Paris, where in the early 1990s he played in Noël Akchoté’s groups Trash Corporation and Unit and in 1992 founded Quartet Z. He joined Henri Texier’s Azur Quartet (1992) and Sonjal Septet (1996), played in Sylvain Beuf’s quartet, formed an international group including, most notably, Julien Lourau, and appeared at the festival Banlieues Bleues (1997), where he presented ...

Article

Hans-Hubert Schönzeler

(b Oppach, April 9, 1850; d Munich, Sept 4, 1903). German conductor and composer. Trained at the teachers’ seminary at Bautzen (where he also received a thorough musical education), Zumpe taught in the local school at Weigsdorf in 1870–71, then went as a teacher to Leipzig, where he furthered his musical studies with Tottmann. He turned to music completely when Wagner called him to Bayreuth in 1872 (an association which became the main influence in his development) to assist in the completion of the Ring score. As a conductor he travelled widely throughout Germany and held important positions in Stuttgart (1891), Schwerin (1897) and Munich (1895 and 1900). He also visited London (conducting Wagner at Covent Garden in 1898), Odessa, Madrid and St Petersburg. An energetic and intelligent conductor, he was regarded in his day, especially in Wagner’s music, as comparable to Richter, Mottl and Levi. As a composer he was strongly influenced by Wagner; his operas and operettas enjoyed a certain measure of success during his lifetime. At his death he left an unfinished opera, ...

Article

Marcia J. Citron

(b Stuttgart, Dec 9, 1796; d Stuttgart, Aug 1, 1857). German composer, pianist, singer and teacher . The youngest of seven children born to the composer Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg, she studied the piano with Schlick and theory with Wilhelm Sutor. Gifted with a fine alto voice, she was soon singing and performing on the piano (e.g. at the Stuttgart Museumskonzerte). As an adult Zumsteeg mixed with leading musicians and poets. The literary ties reflected her interest in the lied, which formed the basis of her creative reputation. She also wrote several piano works, such as the early Trois polonaises, published in 1821 and favourably reviewed in the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung, and sacred choral music. She occupied a central position in the musical life of Stuttgart as a teacher of voice and piano and as a leading member of the Verein für Klassische Kirchenmusik.

Zumsteeg’s lieder were still known in the late 19th century (Michaelis) but have not remained in the repertory. She composed about 60 songs. The six lieder of her op.6 received a brief but laudatory notice in the ...

Article

(b Sachsenflur, nr Mergentheim, Jan 10, 1760; d Stuttgart, Jan 27, 1802). German composer and conductor. His father was in military service before becoming a personal servant of Duke Carl Eugen of Württemberg. After the early death of his mother, Zumsteeg received a good general education at the Carlsschule in Stuttgart, the military academy founded by the duke, where he became friendly with Schiller and the sculptor Johann Heinrich Dannecker (who made a bust of him). Zumsteeg was originally intended for a career as a sculptor, but his musical talent showed itself early. He studied the cello with the chamber virtuoso Eberhard Malterre and from 1775 with the cello soloist and court Kapellmeister, Agostino Poli, who also taught him composition. Zumsteeg’s first works, among them most of the ten surviving cello concertos, were composed during his student days. The most significant works of this period are the melodramatic setting of Klopstock’s ode ...

Article

Ken Rattenbury

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[Robert Albert; Zukowski, Bogusław Albert]

(b Detroit, Jan 17, 1912; d Los Angeles, Feb 16, 1944). American pianist and composer. At an early age he displayed a precocious talent for playing piano in an assertive, confident style influenced by the blues. He worked in Philadelphia as a member of an orchestra led by the pianist Oliver Naylor, recording in 1925 and appearing at the Palace d’Or and the Orient restaurant in the late 1920s and early 1930s; he also spent a period with the Playboys, led by the double bass player Thelma Terry (recording in 1928). After performing with the singer Seymour Simons and at Smokey’s Club in Detroit he came to prominence as a member of Bob Crosby’s band (late 1936 – mid-1939), in which he was Joe Sullivan’s replacement; while with Crosby he gained recognition as a leading exponent of the boogie-woogie style, and in 1939 he was named “best pianist” by ...

Article

Gert Oost

(b Rotterdam, Aug 20, 1877; d Zaandam, July 13, 1937). Dutch organist, composer and organologist . He studied with, among others, Hendrik de Vries, a composer and organist at the Laurenskerk in Rotterdam. From 1893 he worked as an organist in Rotterdam, and from 1898 until his death was organist of the Hersteld Evangelical Lutheran church in Amsterdam, where he gave many recitals on the famous Strumphler organ (now in St Eusebius in Arnhem). There he opposed the practice of playing organ transcriptions and promoted original organ music. He had an extensive repertory, including many then unknown French and German works. From 1929 he gave weekly organ recitals on the radio. He also made a study of historical Dutch organs and organ music, especially the works of Sweelinck, Hendrick Spuy and Anthoni van Noordt. Zwart composed many organ works based on Reformed church songs and in a romantic style, which he published himself along with various articles. The series Nederlandsche Orgelmuziek, published in Koog aan den Zaan from ...

Article

Hellmut Federhofer

(b Judenburg, Styria, c1545–50; d ?Graz, Styria, May 1582). Austrian singer and composer. He was chorister in the Stephansdom, Vienna, and in 1559 was admitted to the university there. In 1572 his name appears last in a list of five basses employed at the Graz court household of Archduke Karl II of Inner Austria. At the express wish of the archduke he took holy orders and in 1579, when he accompanied his master to Munich, he was nominated first court chaplain. He himself used the title ‘Elimosinarius’ (almoner) in 1581. All that has survived of his work is a Magnificat à 6, A la fontaine du pris (in A-Gu , D-Kl and SI-Lu, ed. in DTÖ, cxxxiii, 1981), based on the chanson with the same title by Willaert. This work shows Zweiller to have been among the earliest composers to write parody Magnificat settings, a style with which he had presumably become familiar through contact with Lassus at Munich....

Article

Andrew Lamb

[Mariel]

(b Pistyán, Hungary, July 13, 1876; d Vienna, 14/June 15, 1947). Austro-Hungarian soprano. She sang soubrette roles at the Carltheater in Vienna from 1901 to 1920, also appearing at the summer theatre in the Prater, the Raimundtheater and the Theater an der Wien. She was the original Franzi in Straus’s ...

Article

William Kirk Bares

(b New York, NY, May 18, 1930; d Paris, France, April 2, 2010). American Jazz trombonist, bass trumpeter, and author. He is most widely known in musical circles for his work in Miles Davis’s Birth of the Cool band in 1948. Zwerin is better known to readers as a jazz contributor to Esquire, Playboy, Rolling Stone, Vogue, and Elle, and also as America’s preeminent European jazz correspondent. After a stint as a jazz critic for New York’s Village Voice (1964–9), he became the publication’s European editor (1969–71). In 1979 Zwerin became the Paris-based jazz critic for the International Herald Tribune, and in 2005 for Bloomberg News. His expatriate experiences are detailed with wit and candor in the autobiographical The Parisian Jazz Chronicles: an Improvisational Memoir (New Haven, 2005). His books La Tristesse de Saint Louis: Jazz under the Nazis (1987, reprinted as ...

Article

K. Robert Schwarz

(b Miami, April 30, 1939). American composer and violinist. She studied with John Boda at Florida State University (BM 1960, MM 1962), then moved to New York to study the violin with Galamian. As a member of the American SO under Stokowski, she acquired invaluable training in performance and orchestration. Eventually, she enrolled at the Juilliard School, where she studied with Carter and Sessions and, in 1975, became the first woman to take the DMA in composition. Meanwhile, performances of her music began occurring with increasing frequency: Symposium for orchestra (1973) was conducted by Boulez, the String Quartet 1974 was played at the ISCM World Music Days in Boston and the Sonata in Three Movements (1973–4) was performed by her husband, the violinist Joseph Zwilich. Symphony no.1, first performed in 1982 by the American Composers Orchestra under Schuller, brought her international renown in ...

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

(b Hamburg, Germany, May 7, 1955). German pianist, brother of Torsten Zwingenberger. He studied classical piano from the age of six and adopted the boogie-woogie style in 1973. From 1974 he performed at numerous boogie-woogie, blues, and jazz festivals and broadcast frequently on television and radio throughout Europe, and between 1983 and 1991 he made regular appearances on the television program “ZDF-Teleillustrierte.” In addition he toured with Monty Sunshine and Max Collie (both 1978) and Alexis Korner (March 1979), recorded in Los Angeles with Joe Turner (ii) (May 1978, 1981), and toured and recorded with Lionel Hampton (April–May 1980, 1982, 1983) and the blues singer Champion Jack Dupree (October 1980, 1988, 1990). From the early 1980s Zwingenberger toured in the shows Stars of Boogie Woogie and Hot Jazz Meeting, and he made tours of East Asia (1981), Indonesia and Malaysia (...

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

(b Hamburg, Germany, Jan 12, 1959). German drummer, brother of Axel Zwingenberger. From the mid-1970s he led his own groups and performed and recorded regularly with his brother; in 1978 the two recorded in Los Angeles as accompanists to Joe Turner (ii). In 1983 Zwingenberger made the album Buddy Tate Meets Torsten Zwingenberger (Moustache Music 120159) and formed the Swingburger Quintet, and in the 1990s he led a quartet. He recorded again as a leader in 1989 (with Plas Johnson as his guest soloist) and in 1993 (the album Open Sunroof, Blackbird 41012) and as an unaccompanied soloist in 1991. In November 1992 he played in New York in a hard-bop trio with Peter Bernstein and the double bass player Ari Roland.

ReclamsJ “Jazz News,” JP, 32/7 (1983), 37 A. Geyer: “Buddy Tate und Torsten Zwingenberger Band,” JP, 37/1 (1988), 35 C. Hasenmaile: “Moderner geworden: Torsten Zwingenberger,” JP...

Article

Robin A. Leaver

[Huldreich ]

(b Wildhaus, Jan 1, 1484; d Cappel, Oct 11, 1531). Swiss humanist and church reformer . Of all the reformers of the 16th century he was the most musically gifted and yet the most antagonistic towards the use of music in public worship. He was educated first in Basle, then in Berne where he came under the influence of the poet, composer and humanist scholar Wölflin. While in Berne, at the age of 12 Zwingli entered the chapel choir of the local monastery simply to further his musical ambitions. Many of his contemporaries (e.g. Bullinger and Myconius) commented on his extraordinary musical gifts. Wyss (see Finsler, 1901) wrote:

I have never heard about anyone who, in the musical arts – that is, in singing and all the instruments of music, such as lute, harp, large viol, small viol, pipes, German flute … the trumpet, dulcimer, cornett, and waldhorn, and whatever else of such like had been invented … could take it to hand as quickly as he....

Article

Lothar Knessl

(b Vienna, April 29, 1935). Austrian composer and pianist. He studied at the Vienna Music Academy, where his teachers included Karl Schiske (composition), Bruno Seidlhofer and Josef Dichler (piano). He also attended the Darmstadt summer courses (1958, 1964–6), winning the Kranichstein Music Prize of the international piano competition on his first visit. In 1965, with Kurt Schwertsik and H.K. Gruber, he founded the neo-tonal and ironically intended Salonkonzerte, through which he hoped to counter a view of ‘music as a substitute religion’. After 1967 the group developed into the MOBart & toneART ensemble, whose productions, linking performance, music and language, related to the ‘instrumental theatre’ movement. Zykan's most characteristic works are his ‘total art productions’, in which processes of permutation extend to movement, sounds and linguistic elements alike, sometimes producing compromise and sometimes distortion, and often reducing critical comment to the absurd. As his creative work has been conceived entirely in relation to the present, a number of his works exist only in a sketch-like draft form. He has mostly dispensed with publication, since the majority of his works depend on his personal interpretation. As a result, a number of compositions have been lost. He has also created TV advertisements for well-known firms....