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Anthem I. England 5. History c1770–c1890.: Ex.5 Battishill: O Lord look down from Heaven

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Anthem I. England 5. History c1770–c1890.: Ex.6 S.S. Wesley: Blessed be the God and Father

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Anthem I. England 6. History c1890 to the present.: Ex.7 Stanford: Beati quorum via

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Kostas Kardamis

(b Corfu, 1952). Greek trumpet player, soloist, and educator. He began his training in the ‘Mantzaros’ Philharmonic Society of Corfu and commenced his trumpet studies in the Hellenic Conservatory of Athens (Dimitris Kafyris’s class). He was principal performer in the Greek National Opera (1975–90), the Athens State Orchestra (1980–91), and the Greek Radio National Symphonic Orchestra (1976–2003). He is a member of the Orchestra of Colours, an ensemble founded in 1989 by Manos Chatzidakis, with whom Anthis had been a close collaborator for more than 20 years.

Anthis is a founding member of the Nikolaos Mantzaros Chamber Music Ensemble (1979) and the Melos Brass Quintet (1989), and in this capacity he has performed in such venues as Carnegie Hall, Queen Elizabeth Hall, Salle Pleyel, Palais des Beaux-Arts, and Yostuya Kumin Hall. As soloist Anthis has collaborated with, among others, the Leipzig Radio Orchestra, ALEA III (Boston), and the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra. He has taught trumpet and brass ensembles in the Ionian University’s Music Department, the National Conservatory, the Athens Conservatory, the Corfu Conservatory, and the ‘Philippos Nakas’ Conservatory, of which he is still head of brass. In ...

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Sydney Robinson Charles

A printed or manuscript collection of musical works selected from a particular repertory. Most anthologies contain works by more than one composer. Certain types of collection, which may be anthologies in the broadest sense – folksong collections, tune books, songsters, hymnals, psalters, pasticcios, ballad operas, organ and lute intabulations, and theory or performance manuals with music examples – are not considered in this article, which is confined to printed anthologies of music roughly contemporary with date of publication and containing works by different composers. For manuscript anthologies, see Sources, MS ; for printed anthologies, see Editions, historical .

The value of printed anthologies for the musical scholar and performer goes beyond the individual musical items contained, for the entire make-up of each one reflects the judgment of a knowledgeable contemporary, its compiler, of the interests, tastes and needs of the musical public of that time and place. Thus anthologies can suggest many aspects of social usage. Sometimes the very wording of an anthology title can offer a surprisingly vivid picture of the circumstances of its intended use, as in ...

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Keith Polk

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Randall H. Tollefsen

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(fl c1440–70). ?Italian composer. Previously thought to have been English, he is now presumed to have been a native of the Trentino, perhaps identifiable with the nobleman and lawyer Christophorus Anthonii de Molveno, traceable in Trent in 1449–68. His works, comprising a Sanctus, Magnificat primi toni, and a hymn (all for three voices), are all copied in I-TRmp 90, the Magnificat is also in I-TRcap 93 (all of his works are ed. M. Gozzi, Collana per la storia della musica nel Trentino, xvi, 1991). Two of his cantus firmi suggest Germanic connections: the chant that appears in decorated form in the Sanctus (superius) resembles Sanctus IV in the Passau gradual, and the chant used in Ut queant laxis (also in the superius) is from the Klosterneuburg hymnal. A contrafactum of the latter work honours St Vigilius, patron of Trent. Anthonii's music seems to lack sophistication, often using progressions of consecutive 6-3 chords and employing strict fauxbourdon in the ...

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Gregory F. Barz

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Olive Baldwin

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(b New York, March 28, 1930). American double bass player. He worked with Georgie Auld (1951), Jimmy Dorsey (1953), Gerry Mulligan (1954), and Claude Thornhill (1956) and performed and recorded with Buddy DeFranco (1950–51), Charlie Spivak (1952...

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Elizabeth Forbes

[Caruso, Calogero Antonio]

(b New Orleans, July 15, 1929; d Tampa, FL, Feb 15, 2012). American tenor. He studied at New Orleans and in Rome, making his début in 1954 as the Holy Fool (Boris Godunov) at the Metropolitan, where he sang for 30 years in a wide variety of lyric and character roles. They included Almaviva, Ernesto, Nemorino, Beppe (...

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Robert E. Eliason

(b 1736; d Philadelphia, Dec 29, 1804). American woodwind instrument maker of German birth. He was one of the earliest woodwind makers to take his skills to the New World. He arrived in Philadelphia about 1764 and continued in business as a turner and musical instrument maker until his death in ...

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Paula Morgan, Jon Stroop and Paula Matthews

(b Providence, RI, Feb 18, 1922; d Tucson, AZ, April 6, 2001). American musicologist. He attended Columbia University (BS 1946, MA 1948), the University of Paris (diploma 1951) and the University of Southern California, where he took his doctorate in 1964 with a dissertation on André Campra’s opéra-ballets. After serving on the faculty of the University of Montana (1948–50) he became a professor at the University of Arizona (1952); he retired in 1992. Anthony’s particular area of study was French music of the 17th and 18th centuries, and he concentrated on opéra-ballet of the French Baroque in many of his writings. His book on French Baroque music is valuable as an introduction to a vast body of instrumental and vocal music which has not been thoroughly explored; the volume has been cited as the classic study of its subject. Anthony was also known as a harpsichordist. He was named Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Government in ...

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Frances R. Aparicio

[Muñiz, Marco Antonio]

(b New York City, Sept 16, 1968). American singer, songwriter, and actor of Puerto Rican ancestry. Named after the famous Mexican singer Marco Antonio Muñiz (b 1933), Marc Anthony has become one of the most famous and important Latino singer-songwriters in the United States. Because of the excellence of his voice and his commitment to his Latino and Caribbean roots, he has become the biggest selling salsa artist of all time, with over 10 million albums sold worldwide. After singing house and freestyle music in English in his early career, Marc Anthony revitalized salsa music with a series of early 1990s musical hits that paved the way for the 1999 Latin pop explosion. He has successfully crossed linguistic borders, singing both in English and Spanish within the same album and thus contesting the label of “crossover.” His stage performances and the hybrid musical arrangements that have cast traditional Puerto Rican songs like “Preciosa” and “Lamento borincano” as salsa songs embody his Nuyorican identity in the public space, thus exemplifying the transnational nature of salsa music. Some of his best-known songs in English include “I Need to Know” and “You Sang to Me.”...

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Wayne Schneider

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(b Bentleyville, PA, Jan 20, 1922). Trumpeter and bandleader. He first played professionally in the late 1930s, then worked with bands led by Glenn Miller (1940–41) and Jimmy Dorsey (1942). During World War II he led a navy band for two years. After being discharged he formed a band in 1946 which had a hit single, Bunny Hop, in 1952. This started a national dance craze that contributed considerably to Anthony’s success. As well as continuing to record he performed with his band on television (1953–5) and in several films. He also appeared without the band in other films, including The Five Pennies (1959), a biography of Red Nichols in which he portrayed Jimmy Dorsey, and later in Story of the Big Band Era (1963), in which the jazz element of his studio big band’s performance is enhanced by the participation of such soloists as Frank Rosolino, Dave Pell, and Joe Maini, with Nick Ceroli on drums. After ...

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(b Montona [now Motovun], Istria [Croatia], c1480; d after 1538). Italian woodblock cutter, editor, publisher and composer of Croatian birth. His birthplace is frequently appended to his name, as in his papal privilege of 1516: ‘to our beloved son Andreas Antiquus de Montona, cleric of the diocese of Parenzo now living in Rome’. (Despite the reference to clerical status, there is no evidence that he was ordained as a priest or served the church.) Active as a woodblock cutter, editor and music publisher in Rome from 1510 to 1518, in Venice 1520–21 and again from 1533 to 1539, he was the earliest competitor of Ottaviano Petrucci, who had initiated the printing of volumes of polyphonic music at Venice in 1501. Antico was the first to publish such books in Rome.

Antico’s method differed fundamentally from Petrucci’s: Antico was a cutter of woodblocks from which music and text were printed in one impression, whereas Petrucci employed multiple impression from moveable type. Antico both cut the blocks for and published, in collaboration with printers and others, his Roman editions and those of his first two years in Venice. After ...

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