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Article

Miriam Miller

(d 1634). English music printer. He printed a few musical works between 1610 and 1615, only his initials ‘E.A.’ appearing on certain imprints. He printed Thomas Ravenscroft’s A Briefe Discourse (1614) and John Amner’s Sacred Hymnes of 3, 4, 5 and 6 parts for Voyces and Vyols (1615). His address was ‘neere Christ-Church’ in London. His name appears among a list of printers granted printing monopolies by James I and his successors as ‘Edw. Alday, to print sett songs et al’, but he apparently made little use of any such privilege.

Humphries-SmithMP E. Arber, ed.: A Transcript of the Registers of the Company of Stationers of London, 1554–1640, 1–4 (London, 1875–7/R); v (Birmingham, 1894/R) R.B. McKerrow: ‘Edward Allde as a Typical Trade Printer’, The Library, 4th ser., 10 (1929–30), 121–62 J. Morehen: ‘A Neglected East Anglian Madrigalian Collection of the Elizabethan Period’, ...

Article

[Roggerio]

(b Castelnuovo di Garfagnana; fl 1612). Italian music editor and composer. He edited Responsoria Hebdomadae Sanctae, psalmi, Benedictus, et Miserere, una cum missa ac vesperis Sabbati Sancti, for eight voices and continuo (Venice, 1612²). It includes pieces by 20 composers, among them Croce and Viadana, and two are anonymous; Argilliano himself, with 11 pieces, is the best-represented composer....

Article

Jerome Roche

(b ?Pavia; fl 1609–29). Italian music editor and singer. Since he was known as ‘magister et reverendo’ he must have taken orders. He was a bass singer in the choir of Pavia Cathedral from 1609 to 1626. He is of greatest interest as the collector of four noteworthy anthologies of north Italian church music published in Venice (RISM 16214, 1624², 1626³ and 16295); all contain motets except the third, which consists of litanies. The volumes include eight works by Monteverdi, seven of which are found in no other printed sources, and ten unica by Alessandro Grandi (i) and four by Rovetta (his earliest published works). Other prominent north Italians represented are Stefano Bernardi, Banchieri – who dedicated his Gemelli armonici (1622) to Calvi – Ignazio Donati, Ghizzolo, Merula, Orazio Tarditi and Turini. Calvi himself contributed motets to the first two and included pieces by his ...

Article

(b Naples; fl 1645–53). Italian music editor and composer. He was a Franciscan monk and on a title-page of 1653 is called ‘maestro di musica’. He edited a small volume of five-part sacred music (RISM 1645¹), which had gone into a fourth impression by 1650 (1650...

Article

Tim Carter

(fl 1618–25). Italian printer active in Florence. Although he was printing books by December 1618, his first printed music dates from 1623 when he issued two volumes by Filippo Vitali (including Vitali’s Il secondo libro de madrigali a cinque voci). In 1625 he printed Francesca Caccini’s La liberazione di Ruggiero dall’isola d’Alcina...

Article

(b Wawrzeńczyce, 1606; d Vienna, May 21, 1674). Viennese printer of Polish birth. He studied in Kraków, where he also learnt printing and managed a small press. In 1640 he married the widow of the printer Matthäus Formica (fl 1615–39) and assumed management of his shop on the Kölnerhof; later he became a printer for the university and court book printer. In 1649 he bought the remainder of the Formica shop, including the music type of Leonard Formica (fl 1590–1615), and in 1655 he moved to a larger building on Unteren Bächerstrasse; known as the Cosmeroviushaus, it had five presses, more than 150 sets of type and a foundry. At his death his printing properties were transferred to his son Johann Christoph (1656–85) and thence, as the ‘Cosmerovische Erben’, to Johann’s widow Theresia (until 1686), Matthäus’s widow Susanna Christina (until 1698...

Article

Anne Schnoebelen

(fl Bologna, 2nd half of the 17th century). Italian printer. He was active in Rome before transferring his business to Bologna in 1638. He apparently published no music himself, but the ‘Eredi di Evangelista Dozza’, namely Carlo Manolesi and Pietro Dozza, probably Dozza’s son, issued music during 1663...

Article

David Johnson

revised by Kenneth Elliott

(d Aberdeen, Nov 1675). Scottish music publisher. He was a stationer at Aberdeen, where he began publishing in 1656. In 1662 he and his son John (b Aberdeen; d Aberdeen, late 1704 or Jan 1705) were appointed official printers to the town and university by Aberdeen town council. They immediately ventured into music printing, presumably with town council backing; their first musical publication was Songs and Fancies: to Thre, Foure, or Five Partes, both Apt for Voices and Viols (1662, 2/1666, 3/1682), which was Scotland’s first secular printed music book. Its presentation and contents now appear old-fashioned, resembling London madrigal partbooks around 1600; it is prefaced by a short ‘Exposition of the Gamme’, lifted almost word for word from Morley’s A Plaine and Easie Introduction of 1597. The three editions vary slightly in content; altogether they contain 77 different songs, of which there are 23 by Dowland and his English contemporaries, six other English anonymous partsongs, ten ballad tunes, six Italian songs by Gastoldi with English texts, seven ‘new English-Ayres’ from recent Playford publications and, most importantly, 25 Scottish items, 16 from the 16th century. Curiously, only the cantus partbook was ever issued; it seems likely that Forbes was printing with sales to burgh music schools in mind (the Aberdeen music school is mentioned on the title-page). As music-school pupils mostly had unbroken voices, a preponderance of cantus copies would be required; other voice parts were perhaps supplied by Forbes in manuscript to individual order. The ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(fl early 17th century). Italian music printer. In partnership with Lucrezio Nucci, he was active in Naples when it was a centre for music printing: the firms of Carlino & Pace and Sottile were also flourishing at the time. The bookseller P.P. Riccio financed a number of Gargano and Nucci's early publications including Teatro de madrigali (RISM 160916) edited by Scipione Riccio. Between then and 1618 the firm published nearly 20 musical editions, mostly of secular music by local composers such as Camillo and Francesco Lambardi, Maiello, Montella and Montesardo. The most important publication was Cerone's treatise El melopeo y maestro (1613).

Lucrezio Nucci published a few musical works on his own during 1616 and 1617. His 1616 edition of Alessandro Di Costanzo's first book of madrigals is remarkable for its colophon, which refers to an earlier edition in the following terms: ‘Naples, Giovanni Battista Sottile, ...

Article

Susan Bain

(fl Rotterdam, mid-17th century). Dutch musician and publisher. He may be related to Géry Ghersem, maître de chapelle to Philip II in Spain at the beginning of the 17th century. Archives at Rotterdam show that Geertsom rented a house there from 1665 to 1669; his publications of 1656–7 give his address as ‘Rotterdam, in de Meulesteegh’. Four music collections, published between 1656 and 1661, are known. The composers represented are all Italian, including many active in Rome: Abbatini, Carissimi, Stefano Fabri (ii), Gratiani, Marcorelli (= Marco Aurelli) and Tarditi. The volume Scelta di motetti, for example, contains (with one exception) motets by composers who held positions at various churches in Rome. Geertsom appears to have had business connections with the firm of Phalèse family in Antwerp. Not only does his music type bear a distinct resemblance to that of Phalèse, but also ‘Mr Jan Gersem’ is listed in a ...

Article

Miriam Miller

(d 1679). English music printer. He succeeded Thomas Harper in 1656 and took over the printing of all of John Playford the elder’s musical publications until his death in 1679. Godbid was a reliable and conscientious printer, if not an inspired one. In spite of the fact that the printing materials he inherited from Thomas Harper dated back over a generation, and were out of date by the middle of the 17th century, for 23 years Godbid’s press produced the music volumes on which the elder Playford’s remarkable business was built. He also printed Tomkins’s ...

Article

Paul-André Gaillard

revised by Laurent Guillo

(b Senlis, Oct 20, 1543; d Geneva, Feb 3, 1628). French music publisher. He studied law in Paris but then devoted himself to the Reformation movement. He left Paris for Geneva in 1566 and was ordained there on 20 October. He carried out his ministry first at Chancy and Cartigny, and then, after serving in several French parishes, was appointed in 1571 to St Gervais, Geneva. He succeeded Bèze as head of the Church in Geneva on the latter’s death in 1605. Between about 1576 and 1597 he published works by Lassus, Arcadelt, Crecquillon, Gérard de Turnhout, Jean de Castro, Noé Faignient, Goudimel, Séverin Cornet, Guillaume Boni, Antoine de Bertrand and others, with modified, and in some cases new, texts. The only composer whose works he published in their original form was Jean Servin. All the known Genevan music printers of this time printed his works (Jean Le Royer, Pierre de Saint-André, Jean II de Tournes) and some of them were commissioned by foreign booksellers (Charles Pesnot in Lyons or Jérôme Commelin in Heidelberg). The prefaces he wrote to his publications (in ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(fl Rome, 1624–50). Italian printer and publisher. He was active in Rome from 1624 to 1650. He seems to have had some contact with Vincenzo Bianchi, bookseller and later (from 1628) publisher of music, and who himself printed a few books in the years around 1640. Grignani published a few treatises (mostly by Romano Micheli) before 1638 when he began to print music. In a dozen years he printed nearly 50 books of music or treatises, among them a number of Micheli’s canons. He seems to have published only two books of secular music and two reprints of instrumental works. The rest was characteristically Roman: a collection of sacred works by local composers (Cifra, Francesco Foggia, Massenzio and both Mazzocchis), and a collection edited by Florido de Silvestris. He also reprinted works by Palestrina and Anerio in 1646 and 1649, and published several volumes of music by Diruta and treatises by Kircher and Sabbatini....

Article

Stanley Boorman

(d after 1610). German printer, son of Georg Hantzsch. He took over his father’s press in 1583 and printed in Mühlhausen until 1599, when he was invited to become city printer at Hildesheim. He started there in 1600 with an ambitious list, but production fell away and he was back in Mühlhausen in 1609. His last recorded edition is dated 1611; all the music that survives from his press appeared before 1600, with the exception of a treatise by Martin Scheffer, printed in 1603. The rest comprises, almost exclusively, volumes dedicated to works by Burck, several of which are editions of music first printed by his father.

J.H. Gebauer: ‘Das Buchgewerbe in der Stadt Hildesheim’, Niedersächsisches Jb, 18 (1941), 223–58 W. Hartmann: ‘Hildesheimer Drucke der Zeit vor 1650’, Alt-Hildesheim, 31 (1960), 1–36 [catalogue with illustrations] J. Benzing: Die Buchdrucker des 16. und 17. Jahrhunderts im deutschen Sprachgebiet (Wiesbaden, 1963, 2/1982)...

Article

Miriam Miller

(d ?London, March 1656). English music printer. He worked in London from 1614 and acquired part of the business of Thomas Snodham. From 1650 until his death he printed all the elder John Playford’s music publications, including the first edition of The English Dancing Master (dated 1651 but issued in ...

Article

David Johnson

revised by Kenneth Elliott

(d Edinburgh, Dec 1621). Scottish bookseller and printer. By 1589 he was an importer of foreign books; in 1601 his name appeared in a psalm book printed in Dordrecht, the Netherlands, to be sold in Scotland. In 1610 he became a publisher in Edinburgh, issuing a famous folio Bible in that year and many psalters (with the melodies), as well as books of Scottish court poetry, mathematics and theology. One of the most interesting of the psalters is that of 1615 in which, for the first time, the 12 Common Tunes were printed as a group and given distinctive titles.

After Hart’s death, his widow (d Edinburgh, 3 May 1642) published more psalm books with the imprint ‘the Heires of Andro Hart’. Among these is the most important 17th-century Scottish church music publication, the 1635 psalter, which contains 143 psalm settings, nearly all by Scottish composers: 104 of Proper Tunes, 31 of Common Tunes and 8 imitative settings ‘in reports’....

Article

Stanley Boorman

(d Coburg, 1618). German printer. He was in charge of the ducal printing house in Coburg from 1596 until his death, and from 1599 he was also a city official. He printed almost nothing but the works of Benedikt Faber, Melchior Franck and Heinrich Hartmann. Particularly interesting among his extant publications is a series of volumes, including anthologies (RISM ...

Article

Marie Louise Göllner

(b Oberursell, c1575; d Munich, 1654). German printer. The son of a printer, he served his apprenticeship under Adam Berg in Munich. In 1597 he married his employer's daughter, Susanna, apparently against the wishes of both families, and became a citizen of Munich. He became a Catholic and was granted permission to found his own printing house by Duke Maximilian I on 3 November 1597. Thanks to the patronage of the powerful Jesuit congregation, Henricus was soon appointed court printer and had by the turn of the century usurped the lead in publishing from Adam Berg. After his death his daughter, Jakobe, continued the business for a short time, selling it to Jakob Jäcklin in 1656.

All publishing in Bavaria was subjected to strict censorship and the dukes reserved to themselves the privilege normally exercised by city governments of granting permission to prospective publishers. Thus Henricus was the only printer, besides Berg and his descendants, who was allowed to practise his trade in Munich, until well into the 17th century. His publications were devoted almost exclusively to collections of sacred Latin music by Orlande de Lassus and by composers such as Jacob Reiner, Aichinger, Klingenstein and Holzner, who worked in Munich or Augsburg in the early 17th century. He also printed most of the works by Sebastian Ertl, including those vocal works with an added organ part or continuo. His chief contribution was the publication of the important posthumous collections of Lassus's works edited by his sons Rudolph and Ferdinand. These include otherwise unpublished masses and ...

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Article

Miriam Miller

(fl London, 1612–18). English engraver. He engraved the plates for Parthenia, or The Maydenhead of the First Musicke that ever was Printed for the Virginalls (c1612), and Angelo Notari’s Prime musiche (c1613), the earliest engraved music to be published in England. A Robert Hole has been thought to have been the engraver of ...