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Article

Edith Gerson-Kiwi

revised by Bret Werb

[Yuly Dmitrevich]

(b Berdyansk, Crimea, 4/April 16, 1868; d Tel-Aviv, Feb 11, 1927). Russian composer, critic, lexicographer and folklorist. He studied law at Kharkov University but soon turned to music, studying theory and composition with Taneyev and Ippolitov-Ivanov at the Moscow Conservatory (1893–7). From 1897 to 1919 he worked as a music critic for the newspaper Russkiye vedomosti. In 1901 his translation of Riemann’s Lexikon into Russian with newly written sections on Russian music was published in Moscow. Although an early opera, Esther, was performed in 1894, his work as a critic overshadowed that as a composer. Under the influence of the Russian nationalist music critic Vladimir Stasov, however, he turned his attention to Jewish folklore, collecting, arranging, performing and publishing the songs of eastern European Jews. In 1909 his first album of ten Jewish folksongs appeared in Moscow; a second volume followed later in the same year. Engel continued to promote his new interest with public lectures and a series of articles in ...

Article

Travis D. Stimeling

[Chester W., Jr. ]

(b Fort Worth, TX, Oct 21, 1943; d Nashville, TN, June 19, 2013). American music critic, biographer, and editor. With contemporaries Ed Ward, Martha Hume, Dave Hickey, and Alanna Nash, Flippo helped bring country music criticism to the mainstream press in the 1970s. He earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Sam Houston State University and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Texas at Austin. As a freelance journalist and Rolling Stone Contributing Editor, he covered the progressive country music scene in Austin before being named Rolling Stone’s New York Bureau Chief (1974). From 1977 until 1980, he served as Senior Editor for Rolling Stone, using his position to significantly increase the magazine’s coverage of country music. During the 1980s Flippo wrote several book-length studies of country and rock artists, including Hank Williams (1981), the Rolling Stones (1985), and Paul McCartney (...

Article

H.C. Colles

revised by Frank Howes

(b Norwich, Sept 14, 1859; d Dinton, nr Salisbury, May 2, 1948). English musicologist, critic and editor. He was educated at Wellington College and Balliol College, Oxford (MA, 1882), and studied music for two years at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik. He became a schoolmaster at Dulwich College (1884–6) and a form master at Wellington (1887–1910), where he succeeded Alan Gray as the music master in 1893, a post he held until 1901, when he was made house master in college. During these years he wrote a Wellington College German Grammar and visited India, which aroused his interest in Indian music. When he left Wellington in 1910 he returned to India for eight months, collecting material for a book which is still a classic on its subject, The Music of Hindostan (1914); he also acted as Rabindranath Tagore's unpaid literary agent, ...

Article

(b London, April 7, 1856; d Carnforth, Lancs., March 30, 1936). English critic, editor and musical scholar. Poor health disrupted his early nonconformist education and apart from three terms at Westminster School he was, by necessity, taught privately. His musical education began in 1872 when he took piano lessons with Ernst Pauer. In 1875 he entered Trinity College, Cambridge, where he became friends with Stanford and W.B. Squire, whose elder sister he married in 1885, and with whom he participated fully in the flourishing activities of the Cambridge University Musical Society. After graduation in 1882 he studied the piano with Dannreuther and Rockstro; both took a keen interest in early music, but it was Rockstro who introduced him to harpsichord playing. Although he cultivated a reputation as an exponent of the piano and harpsichord, it was in the field of antiquarian studies and musical journalism that he found his true vocation. He was invited by Grove to write articles for his ...

Article

Paula Morgan

(b New York, March 4, 1857; d Babylon, NY, July 27, 1918). American writer on music. After studies in Wiesbaden and New York he attended Columbia University, graduating from the School of Arts in 1877 and the School of Law in 1879. From 1879 to 1880 he was editor of the Musical Review. Beginning in 1880 he was music critic for a series of New York papers, The Sun, The World, the Mail and Express, and The Herald; he was music and art critic for The Herald at the time of his death. In 1883 Kobbé was sent to Bayreuth by The World to report on the first performance of Parsifal.

A prolific writer, he is chiefly known for his Complete Opera Book (1919), a collection of opera plots and analyses, which has become a standard work of reference; he also published books on Wagner and other composers, opera singers, and works on the pianola and the Aeolian pipe organ....

Article

George J. Buelow

(b Hamburg, Sept 28, 1681; d Hamburg, April 17, 1764). German composer, critic, music journalist, lexicographer and theorist.

Mattheson was the third and only surviving son of Johann Mattheson, a Hamburg tax collector, and Margaretha Höling of Rendsburg (Holstein). Details of Mattheson’s life come largely from his autobiography published in the Grundlage einer Ehren-Pforte. His education was exceptionally broad, perhaps because his parents hoped he would gain a position in Hamburg society. At the Johanneum he received a substantial background in the liberal arts, including musical instruction from Kantor Joachim Gerstenbüttel. He also had private instruction in dancing, drawing, arithmetic, riding, fencing, and English, French and Italian. At six he began private music lessons, studying the keyboard and composition for four years with J.N. Hanff (later organist at Schleswig Cathedral), taking singing lessons from a local musician named Woldag and instruction on the gamba, violin, flute, oboe and lute. At nine Mattheson was a child prodigy, performing on the organ and singing in Hamburg churches. His voice was of such quality that Gerhard Schott, manager of the Hamburg opera, invited him to join the company, and he sang in J.W. Franck’s opera ...

Article

Rosemary Williamson

(b Florence, June 8, 1927; d Cambridge, Jan 16, 2001). British writer of partly Italian descent. He studied at Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania, and was a research student in history with Herbert Butterfield at Cambridge (1948–51). He then worked for the (Manchester) Guardian, as leader writer, features editor and deputy London editor, before moving to Sussex University, 1964–89, to teach history, finally as reader. Rosselli worked as a critic but was chiefly noted for his writings on the social and economic background of opera, particularly in Italy. His authoritative The Opera Industry in Italy (1984) explored aspects of operatic history and culture unfamiliar to the music historian, as too did his Music and Musicians in Nineteenth-Century Italy (1991) and his studies of the role, in the broadest sense, of the singer. These include important articles on castratos, the singer’s relation to his patrons, a study of contractual documents between pupils and teachers, and a book on the profession itself, ...

Article

Julie Anne Sadie

(John)

(b London, 30 Oct 1930; d Cossington, Somerset, 21 March 2005). English musicologist, critic, and editor. He was educated at St Paul’s School, London, and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, reading music under Thurston Dart, Charles Cudworth, and Patrick Hadley (BA, MusB 1953, MA 1957, PhD 1958). After teaching at Trinity College of Music, London (1957–65), he worked as a music critic for The Times (1964–81), a reviewer for Gramophone (1965–2005), editor of the Musical Times (1967–87), and general editor of the Master Musicians series (from 1976). In 1970 he was appointed editor of the New Grove dictionaries, serving as emeritus editor from 1999; he also initiated and edited a number of related or kindred publications including a Handbook series and the Man and Music/Music and Society series. He was for many years a regular broadcaster on Radio 3 and the World Service, chiefly on 18th-century topics, and prepared several critical editions, notably of the Mozart piano sonatas (...

Article

Anthony C. Baines

revised by Darryl Martin

(b London, 1664; d Spofforth, 1708). English writer on music . He was educated at Westminster School and Trinity College, Cambridge where he matriculated in 1683, becoming a minor Fellow in 1689 and major Fellow in 1690. He played a leading role in the early promotion of Cambridge University Press. He was Regius Professor of Hebrew at Cambridge from 1699 to 1704 when he moved to Spofforth, where he had a rectorship since 1700. He received his doctorate from Cambridge in 1705. His importance to music history derives from his manuscript GB-Och Music MS 1187 (formerly owned by Henry Aldrich) which provides copious information on instruments. The manuscript, which was probably written between 1690 and 1700, consists mainly of 250 numbered sheets on which are recorded details of instruments; much of the information was obtained first-hand from leading players and makers (including Gottfried Finger, John Banister (ii), James Paisible, John Shore and William Bull) and from Talbot’s examination and measurement of instruments provided by these men. Other pages record tunings and tablatures, or quotations from Praetorius, Mersenne and Kircher. The remainder of the manuscript, including sections on ancient Greek music, is in another hand....